Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Kenneth E. Eickmann, Chair, retired from the Air Force after a 31-year career in which his last assignment was commander of the Aeronautical Systems Center within the Air Force Materiel Command at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. In that capacity he led the Air Force’s center of excellence for research, development, and acquisition of aircraft aeronautical equipment and munitions. His leadership accomplishments also include having led the federal rescue and recovery efforts following the 1995 bombing of Oklahoma City’s Alfred P. Murrah Building. More recently, he served as the director of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin. CII, a nonprofit research institute, is the principal national forum for the multitrillion-dollar-a-year construction industry. Gen. Eickmann earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from UT Austin in 1967 and an M.S. in systems engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology in 1968. He is also a graduate of the University of Michigan Executive Business Program and the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Gen. Eickmann is currently a member of NRC’s Air Force Studies Board and was chair of the NRC’s Committee on Analysis of Air Force Engine Efficiency Improvement Options for Large Non-fighter Aircraft.


Natalie W. Crawford (NAE), Vice Chair, is senior fellow and former vice president and director of Project Air Force (PAF) at the RAND Corporation. Since joining RAND in 1964 as a member of the Engineering Sciences



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Assessment of Wingtip Modifications to Increase the Fuel Efficiency of Air Force Aircraft Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Kenneth E. Eickmann, Chair, retired from the Air Force after a 31-year career in which his last assignment was commander of the Aeronautical Systems Center within the Air Force Materiel Command at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. In that capacity he led the Air Force’s center of excellence for research, development, and acquisition of aircraft aeronautical equipment and munitions. His leadership accomplishments also include having led the federal rescue and recovery efforts following the 1995 bombing of Oklahoma City’s Alfred P. Murrah Building. More recently, he served as the director of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin. CII, a nonprofit research institute, is the principal national forum for the multitrillion-dollar-a-year construction industry. Gen. Eickmann earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from UT Austin in 1967 and an M.S. in systems engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology in 1968. He is also a graduate of the University of Michigan Executive Business Program and the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Gen. Eickmann is currently a member of NRC’s Air Force Studies Board and was chair of the NRC’s Committee on Analysis of Air Force Engine Efficiency Improvement Options for Large Non-fighter Aircraft. Natalie W. Crawford (NAE), Vice Chair, is senior fellow and former vice president and director of Project Air Force (PAF) at the RAND Corporation. Since joining RAND in 1964 as a member of the Engineering Sciences

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Assessment of Wingtip Modifications to Increase the Fuel Efficiency of Air Force Aircraft and Aeronautical and Astronautics departments, she has held a wide variety of research and administrative posts. She has led PAF research on aircraft survivability, conventional standoff weapons, tactical aircraft, electronic combat, and integrated avionics for the advanced tactical fighter. As director of PAF’s Theater Force Employment Program, Mrs. Crawford formed a team of analysts to compile and edit Desert Storm air campaign data, leading to the first usable databases for analysis of that campaign. While associate director of PAF (1995-1997), she was in charge of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary analysis of the roles and capabilities of the Air Force in the 21st century. Then, as director of PAF, Mrs. Crawford oversaw all research conducted at RAND for the U.S. Air Force. In FY00, at the request of the Air Force chief of staff, she led a major review of requirements, acquisition, operations, and sustainment of Air Force electronic warfare programs and systems, culminating in a four-star summit chaired by the chief of staff. She has been a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board since 1988, serving as its vice chairman in 1990 and 1991 and co-chairman from 1996 to 1999. To develop insight and understanding in her research, she has flown missions in several Air Force aircraft. In 2003, she was awarded the Vance R. Wanner Memorial Award from the Military Operations Research Society. She received a B.A. in mathematics from the University of California at Los Angeles, where she also pursued graduate studies in engineering. Mrs. Crawford was also vice chair of the NRC’s Committee on Analysis of Air Force Engine Efficiency Improvement Options for Large Non-fighter Aircraft. Mark I. Goldhammer is the chief engineer for the Product Development Airplane Performance organization at Boeing Commercial Airplanes. In this position, he has functional oversight of the airplane performance disciplines assigned to the 787 and product development, including responsibilities for the 747-8, derivative and new airplane product development, advanced concepts, and competitive analysis. Mr. Goldhammer joined Boeing Commercial Airplanes in early 1977 and has worked on a variety of product development studies in high-lift aerodynamic design methods, transonic wing design, wind tunnel testing, and other aerodynamic design issues. He held positions as engineer, lead engineer, and manager of aerodynamics engineering on the 777 and was responsible for the aerodynamic configuration design from preliminary design through flight testing and certification. Mr. Goldhammer has also held managerial responsibilities for the aerodynamic configuration development of a rewinged/stretched

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Assessment of Wingtip Modifications to Increase the Fuel Efficiency of Air Force Aircraft derivative of the 747 and the certification of the 737-700C and the 737-900. He also represented the 737-NG on Boeing safety review boards and was instrumental in implementing lean principles to the delivery certification process for the 737-NG program. Prior to Boeing, Mr. Goldhammer began his career at the Douglas Aircraft Company. He received a B.S. in aeronautical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and an M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the University of Southern California. He is also a licensed private pilot. Stephen Justice is concept exploration and development manager within Lockheed Martin’s advanced development programs, also known as the Skunk Works, with responsibility for generating and developing new project ideas. Mr. Justice joined Lockheed in 1984 and held roles of increasing responsibility on programs that included the F-117 Nighthawk Stealth Fighter, YF-22 Stealth Air Superiority Fighter, and numerous classified programs. His aeronautical engineering experience ranges from conceptual design to preliminary design, detail design, fabrication liaison, flight test, design leadership, and program management. He has a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and has two awarded patents and five classified patent disclosures. Prior to Lockheed, Mr. Justice began his career in defense aerospace as a structural designer in Texas with General Dynamics’ Fort Worth Division. In 2005, he received the LM Aeronautics Company AeroStar award and corporate NOVA award for leadership. Mr. Justice also is an instructor for Lockheed Martin Technical Institute in aircraft configuration development, structural design, systems design, and low observables (stealth) technology integration and is a licensed pilot. Clyde Kizer retired in 2004 from Airbus Industries of North America as president of customer service. In that capacity, he had total customer services responsibilities for all Airbus aircraft operating in North America and spares and training responsibilities for all Airbus operators in the Western Hemisphere. Mr. Kizer’s 12-year tenure with Airbus saw explosive growth for that company in North America, going from 98 Airbus aircraft of all types in North America to 980. Prior to Airbus, Mr. Kizer served as senior vice president of operations for Midway Airlines; vice president of engineering and maintenance at the Air Transport Association; and vice president of engineering at United. Mr. Kizer also served for 23 years as a Navy operational and experimental test pilot and flew 14 years as an engineering test

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Assessment of Wingtip Modifications to Increase the Fuel Efficiency of Air Force Aircraft pilot for United. He earned a degree in biochemistry from Eastern Michigan University in 1960. Mr. Kizer was also a member of NRC’s Committee on Analysis of Air Force Engine Efficiency Improvement Options for Large Non-fighter Aircraft. Ilan Kroo (NAE) is a professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University, where he also received a Ph.D. Prior to joining the faculty at Stanford in 1985, he worked in the Advanced Aerodynamics Concepts Branch at NASA’s Ames Research Center for 4 years. His research in aerodynamics and multidisciplinary design optimization includes the study of innovative airplane concepts. He participated in the design of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) modeled on (extinct) pterosaurs (flying reptiles), America’s Cup sailboats, and high-speed research aircraft. In addition to his research and teaching interest, he is director of a small software company and is an advanced cross-country hang glider pilot. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Dr. Kroo was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for new concepts in aircraft design methodology and for the design and development of the SWIFT sailplane. Eli Reshotko (NAE) is Kent H. Smith Professor Emeritus of Engineering at Case Western Reserve University and currently resides in Denver. Dr. Reshotko joined the faculty at Case Western in 1964 and prior to that worked at NASA-Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory (now NASA-Glenn Research Center). Dr. Reshotko graduated from the California Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. in aeronautics and physics, and his expertise includes viscous effects in external and internal aerodynamics. He is a fellow of the following societies: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Physical Society, and the American Academy of Mechanics, of which he has served as president. He is coauthor of over 100 publications and is affiliated with many task forces, committees, and governing boards, many of which he served as chair. Dr. Reshotko was also a member of the NRC’s Committee on Analysis of Air Force Engine Efficiency Improvement Options for Large Non-fighter Aircraft. Raymond Valeika retired from Delta as senior vice president for technical operations (TechOps), where he directed a worldwide maintenance and engineering staff of more than 10,000 professionals, for a fleet of nearly

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Assessment of Wingtip Modifications to Increase the Fuel Efficiency of Air Force Aircraft 600 aircraft. Currently, he is an independent consultant advising major companies in aviation matters and an internationally recognized senior airline operations executive with over 40 years of experience managing large airline maintenance operations. Through his leadership and focus on continuous improvement of the human processes in aviation maintenance, Delta TechOps consistently rated at the top of the industry for performance benchmarks in the areas of safety, quality, productivity, and reliability. Prior to Delta, he held senior executive positions with Pan Am and Continental Airlines. In 1996, Mr. Valeika was honored with the Air Transport Association’s Nuts & Bolts award, which recognized his leadership in the aviation industry. In October 1999, Mr. Valeika received the Marvin Whitlock Award from the Society of Automotive Engineers for his accomplishments and long-term leadership within the aeronautical engineering and commercial aviation industries. Most recently, the Aviation Week Group honored him with a lifetime achievement award. He is also a member of NRC’s Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. He graduated from St. Louis University with a degree in aeronautical engineering in 1964. Mr. Valeika was also a member of NRC’s Committee on Analysis of Air Force Engine Efficiency Improvement Options for Large Non-fighter Aircraft.