Appendix A
Summary of Pre-Workshop Participant Survey

Forty-three workshop participants answered a 10-question survey to gather information on the details of Green Chemistry (GC) and Green Engineering (GE) education issues of interest to the attendees. The mix of multiple-choice, yes-no, and open-ended questions cover who is interested, how should it be taught, who benefits, and funding. The questions together with the tabulated answers are listed below.

QUESTION #1

Academe

Industry

Government

Nonprofit

Other

Integrated

Participants sector

74%

3%

11%

6%

3%

3%

QUESTION #2

Integrated

Separate

Both

 

 

 

GC/GE Integrated or separate course

76%

9%

15%

 

 

 

QUESTION #3

Books

Lecture Materials

Colleague Resistance/Lack of Awareness

Crowded Curriculum

Institutional Resistance

Other

Impediments to incorporation

16%

20%

23%

22%

9%

10%

QUESTION #4

Freshmen

Integrated

Upper-Level Undergraduate

Graduate Level

Other

 

At what grade level

17%

67%

8%

0%

8%

QUESTION #5

Enthusiasm

Recruitment & Retention

Increased Job Opportunities

Other

 

Largest benefit of GC/GE education to student

35%

23%

18%

24%

 

 

QUESTION #6

Yes

No

Some

Unsure

 

 

Sufficient funding/support for GC/GE education

3%

91%

3%

3%

 

 



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Appendix A Summary of Pre-Workshop Participant Survey Forty-three workshop participants answered a 10-question survey to gather information on the details of Green Chemistry (GC) and Green Engineering (GE) education issues of interest to the attendees. The mix of multiple-choice, yes-no, and open- ended questions cover who is interested, how should it be taught, who benefits, and funding. The questions together with the tabulated answers are listed below. QUESTION #1 Academe Industry Government Nonprofit Other Integrated Participants sector 74% 3% 11% 6% 3% 3% QUESTION #2 Integrated Separate Both GC/GE Integrated or separate course 76% 9% 15% QUESTION #3 Colleague Lecture Resistance/Lack Crowded Institutional Books Materials of Awareness Curriculum Resistance Other Impediments to incorporation 16% 20% 23% 22% 9% 10% QUESTION #4 Upper-Level Graduate Freshmen Integrated Undergraduate Level Other At what grade level 17% 67% 8% 0% 8% QUESTION #5 Enthusiasm Recruitment & Increased Job Retention Opportunities Other Largest benefit of GC/GE education to student 35% 23% 18% 24% QUESTION #6 Yes No Some Unsure Sufficient funding/support for GC/GE education 3% 91% 3% 3% 29

OCR for page 29
30 APPENDIX A QUESTION #7 Yes No GC/GE education assist in teaching 100% 0% traditional technical concepts QUESTION #8 Yes No GC/GE helpful teaching 94% 6% multidisciplinary QUESTION #9 TOP 5 OPEN-ENDED RESPONSES What is the single most important action that Funding for more research, curriculum development, teaching materials, U.S. chemical policy reviews, would help advance the implementation of and other GC/GE causes green chemistry and green engineering education? Educational materials and textbooks Awareness at all levels of education. professional societies, and industry Employer demand Required curriculum in classroom QUESTION #10 TOP 5 RESPONSES Who is responsible for taking action? Federal, state, and local government Educational institutions Industry, especially those involved with GC/GE Professional societies (e.g., American Chemical Society) All of the above