Appendix D
Biographies

ORGANIZERS

Paul Anastas is the director of the Green Chemistry Institute in Washington, DC. Until June of 2004 he served as assistant director for environment at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy where his responsibilities included a wide range of environmental science issues, including furthering international public-private cooperation in areas of Science for Sustainability (such as Green Chemistry). Prior to coming to OSTP in October 1999, Dr. Anastas served as the chief of the Industrial Chemistry Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency since 1989. During that period he was responsible for regulatory review of industrial chemicals under the Toxic Substances Control Act and the development of rules, policy, and guidance. In 1991 he established the industry-government-university partnership Green Chemistry Program, which was expanded to include basic research, and the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards. Prior to joining the EPA, he worked as an industrial consultant to the chemical industry in the development of analytical and synthetic chemical methodologies. Dr. Anastas received his M.A. and Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Brandeis University and his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Massachusetts at Boston.


Frankie Wood-Black is the director, Business Services for Downstream Technology, Conoco-Phillips with responsibility for finance, business analysis, training, and assets for Downstream Technology. Prior to this, Frankie was the technology services marketing manager for Phillips and was responsible for in-sourcing research and development activities into the Bartlesville Technical Center and also served as quality assurance team leader at the Borger Refinery and Natural Gas Liquids Center. Wood-Black began her career with Conoco-Phillips in 1989 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, as a research scientist for research and development. In 1994 she was transferred to the Woods Cross Refinery as an environmental scientist whose job responsibilities included regulatory compliance for air, community-right-to-know, and the Toxic Substance Control Act. She was transferred in 1998 to Corporate Health, Environment, and Safety in the Property Risk Management Group to become site manager for nonoperating sites before her relocation to Borger, Texas, in 1999. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in physics with a minor in chemistry from Central State University (now the University of Central Oklahoma) in Edmond, OK, in 1984. She attended Oklahoma State University and received a doctorate in physics in 1989 and completed her M.B.A. in December 2002. Wood-Black has been active in numerous professional activities and serves as the Conoco-Phillips representative on Corporation Associates of the American Chemical Society. She is a contributing editor of the Journal for Chemical Health and Safety with her coauthored column “CHAS Netways.” She has one patent, ten technical publications, and has coauthored a book entitled Emergency Preparedness PlanningA primer for Chemists. Wood-Black regularly makes presentations at the American Chemical Society National meetings. She is a registered environmental manager.

SPEAKERS

David Allen is the Melvin H. Gertz Regents Chair in Chemical Engineering and the director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Resources at the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests lie in air quality and pollution prevention. He is the author of four books and over 150 papers in these areas. The quality of his research has been recognized by the National Science Foundation (through the Presidential Young Investigator Award), the AT&T Foun-



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Appendix D Biographies ORGANIZERS a research scientist for research and development. In 1994 she was transferred to the Woods Cross Refinery as an envi- Paul Anastas is the director of the Green Chemistry Insti- ronmental scientist whose job responsibilities included regu- tute in Washington, DC. Until June of 2004 he served as latory compliance for air, community-right-to-know, and the assistant director for environment at the White House Office Toxic Substance Control Act. She was transferred in 1998 to of Science and Technology Policy where his responsibilities Corporate Health, Environment, and Safety in the Property included a wide range of environmental science issues, in- Risk Management Group to become site manager for nonop- cluding furthering international public-private cooperation erating sites before her relocation to Borger, Texas, in 1999. in areas of Science for Sustainability (such as Green Chem- She received a Bachelor of Science degree in physics with a istry). Prior to coming to OSTP in October 1999, Dr. Anastas minor in chemistry from Central State University (now the served as the chief of the Industrial Chemistry Branch of the University of Central Oklahoma) in Edmond, OK, in 1984. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency since 1989. During She attended Oklahoma State University and received a doc- that period he was responsible for regulatory review of in- torate in physics in 1989 and completed her M.B.A. in De- dustrial chemicals under the Toxic Substances Control Act cember 2002. Wood-Black has been active in numerous pro- and the development of rules, policy, and guidance. In 1991 fessional activities and serves as the Conoco-Phillips he established the industry-government-university partner- representative on Corporation Associates of the American ship Green Chemistry Program, which was expanded to in- Chemical Society. She is a contributing editor of the Journal clude basic research, and the Presidential Green Chemistry for Chemical Health and Safety with her coauthored column Challenge Awards. Prior to joining the EPA, he worked as “CHAS Netways.” She has one patent, ten technical publi- an industrial consultant to the chemical industry in the de- cations, and has coauthored a book entitled Emergency Pre- velopment of analytical and synthetic chemical methodolo- paredness Planning—A primer for Chemists. Wood-Black gies. Dr. Anastas received his M.A. and Ph.D. in organic regularly makes presentations at the American Chemical chemistry from Brandeis University and his B.S. in chemis- Society National meetings. She is a registered environmen- try from the University of Massachusetts at Boston. tal manager. Frankie Wood-Black is the director, Business Services for SPEAKERS Downstream Technology, Conoco-Phillips with responsibil- ity for finance, business analysis, training, and assets for David Allen is the Melvin H. Gertz Regents Chair in Chemi- Downstream Technology. Prior to this, Frankie was the tech- cal Engineering and the director of the Center for Energy nology services marketing manager for Phillips and was re- and Environmental Resources at the University of Texas at sponsible for in-sourcing research and development activi- Austin. His research interests lie in air quality and pollution ties into the Bartlesville Technical Center and also served as prevention. He is the author of four books and over 150 pa- quality assurance team leader at the Borger Refinery and pers in these areas. The quality of his research has been rec- Natural Gas Liquids Center. Wood-Black began her career ognized by the National Science Foundation (through the with Conoco-Phillips in 1989 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, as Presidential Young Investigator Award), the AT&T Foun- 36

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37 APPENDIX D dation (through an Industrial Ecology Fellowship), the and Ph.D. in organic chemistry from State University of New American Institute of Chemical Engineers (through the Cecil York, Stony Brook, in 1972 and 1973. He was a postdoctoral Award for contributions to environmental engineering), and fellow at the University of Utah (1973-1974), and a lecturer the State of Texas (through the Governor’s Environmental at the University of Colorado-Denver (1974-1975). Since Excellence Award). In addition, Dr. Allen is actively in- 1975 he has been a faculty member at the University of volved in developing green engineering educational materi- Scranton. He is also the codirector of the environmental sci- als for the chemical engineering curriculum. His most recent ence program. His areas of interest encompass nitrenium effort is a textbook on design of chemical processes and ions, nitrogen heterocycles, and green chemistry. His inter- products, jointly developed with the EPA. Dr. Allen received ests in green chemistry consist of microwave-assisted or- his B.S. degree in chemical engineering, with distinction, ganic reactions, solvent-free organic reactions, and green from Cornell University in 1979. His M.S. and Ph.D. de- chemistry education. grees in chemical engineering were awarded by the Califor- nia Institute of Technology in 1981 and 1983. He has held Amy Cannon recently graduated as the first Ph.D. in green regular faculty appointments at UCLA and the University of chemistry at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, work- Texas and visiting appointments at the California Institute of ing in Professor John Warner’s research group. Her research Technology and the University of California, Santa Barbara; at UMass Boston involved the environmentally benign syn- he joined the University of Texas in 1995. thesis of photoactive materials, including titanium dioxide semiconductors, photoresist polymers, and novel spiropyran John Andraos earned a Ph.D. in 1992 from the University photoactive materials. Amy received her B.S. in chemistry of Toronto, studying the ketene hydration reaction by flash from Saint Anselm College in Manchester, NH, and worked photolysis. He set up conventional (microsecond) and nano- for the Gillette Company as an analytical chemist for five second laser flash photolysis apparatuses for the Reaction years before returning to graduate school. She was awarded Intermediates Group at Toronto. He then did postdoctoral the Kenneth G. Hancock Memorial Award in Green Chem- work at the University of Ottawa, where he discovered istry in 2004 for her work on titanium dioxide semiconduc- ketene zwitterion intermediates, and at the University of tors and their application in dye-sensitized solar cells. Amy Queensland, Australia, where he discovered the first example currently works as a chemist for Rohm & Haas Electronic of a 1,3-sigmatropic rearrangement in acylketenes by Materials in Marlborough, MA, where she is developing sili- Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. He also devel- con polymeric materials for optical electronic devices. She oped computational protocols for the evaluation of kinetic is also an adjunct professor of green chemistry at the Univer- data obtained in heterogeneous media, such as zeolites and sity of Massachusetts, Lowell. low-temperature argon matrices. Since his appointment as lecturer and course director at York University in 1999, he Terry Collins is the Thomas Lord Professor of Chemistry at has taught and developed courses in organic chemistry. In Carnegie Mellon University, where he directs the Institute 2002 he launched the first industrial and green chemistry for Green Oxidation Chemistry. He is also an honorary pro- course in the history of the Department of Chemistry at York. fessor at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Profes- He has published 35 research articles in refereed journals, 11 sor Collins earned his B.Sc. (1974), M.Sc. (1975), and Ph.D. of these as an independent researcher. He has given invited (1978) degrees from the University of Auckland, where his addresses to Concordia University, the University of West- graduate advisor was Warren R. Roper. After postdoctoral ern Ontario, and the University of Toronto. In 2000 he work at Stanford University with Jim Collman, he joined the launched the CareerChem Web site, which is an in-depth faculty of Caltech in 1980 and the faculty of Carnegie Mellon resource for tracking and cataloguing all named things in University in 1987. He has a number of research awards, chemistry and physics, chronicling the development of including the 1998 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge chemistry through scientific genealogies, and supplying ca- Award. Professor Collins writes and lectures widely on the reer information to young researchers and students for place- possibilities before chemists to develop vibrant new econo- ment in academic and industrial positions worldwide. Since mies to promote sustainability. His research program is fo- 2000 he has given career workshops at the annual Canadian cused on greening oxidation technologies by designing non- Society of Chemistry conference for students and post- toxic catalysts for activating the natural oxidants, hydrogen doctoral fellows. His awards of recognition include the Jun- peroxide and oxygen, for nonpolluting oxidations. Professor ior Research Award from the Australian Research Council Collins serves on the editorial advisory boards of C&E News in 1996, and he is currently the president of the University of and Environmental Chemistry. He is involved in steering or Toronto Sigma Xi Chapter. contributing to numerous international conferences and edu- cational programs aimed at promoting green chemistry. Michael Cann was born and raised in the Saratoga region of upstate New York and attended Marist College, where he F. Fleming Crim is the John E. Willard and Hilldale Profes- earned his B.A. in chemistry in 1969. Mike received his M.A. sor of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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38 APPENDIX D He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1974 and Professor Gron held a position of visiting assistant professor worked on semiconductor manufacturing techniques at the of chemical engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- Engineering Research Center of Western Electric Co. until nology, while working as a visiting scientist with Jefferson 1976. He then spent a year as a director’s postdoctoral staff Tester. Professor Gron is an active member of Project member at Los Alamos National Laboratory and moved to Kaleidoscope’s faculty for the 21st century and has presented Madison as an assistant professor in 1977. He was chair of on aspects of chemistry curriculum at a number of related the department from 1995 to 1998, and is currently chair of workshops. the Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society. His research in chemical reaction dynam- Julie A. Haack is a senior instructor and assistant depart- ics uses lasers to explore and control the course of chemical ment head for chemistry at the University of Oregon, where reactions in both gases and liquids. He is a member of the her work has focused on the incorporation of green chemis- National Academy of Sciences. try principles into the introductory chemistry curriculum for both science and nonscience majors. She is a leader in facili- Berkeley W. Cue, known as Buzz to most of us, consults tating the identification, development, and dissemination of with several technology companies who serve the pharma- green chemistry educational materials throughout the chem- ceutical industry to create innovative solutions for pharma- istry curriculum. ceutical science and manufacturing challenges. Most re- Dr. Haack has developed Greener Education Materials cently, he was responsible for pharmaceutical sciences at (GEMs)s for chemists, a database of green chemistry labora- Pfizer’s Groton, Connecticut, R&D site. He created and led tory exercises and educational materials that is enabling edu- Pfizer’s green chemistry initiative. Dr. Cue retired from cators at all levels to easily identify and incorporate green Pfizer in April 2004 after almost 29 years, but he continues chemistry into their curriculum. GEMs is also becoming in- his mission of advancing green chemistry in the pharmaceu- strumental in supporting the development of a growing com- tical industry. Since he retired in 2004 he has given more munity of green chemistry educators interested in new mate- than a three dozen presentations on various aspects of green rials development. Dr. Haack received her Ph.D. in biology chemistry in the pharmaceutical industry. He received a B.A. from the University of Utah (1991) and her B.S. in chemis- with honors from the University of Massachusetts, Boston try from the University of Oregon (1986). She completed (1969); his Ph.D. (organic chemistry) from the University of postdoctoral work in pharmacology at the University of Alabama (1973); completed postdoctoral research at the North Carolina at Chapel Hill and in biophysics as a Howard Ohio State University (1974); and was a National Cancer Hughes research associate at the University of Oregon. Institute Research fellow at the University of Minnesota (1975). He is a member of the Gamma Sigma Epsilon chem- Steve Howdle holds a chair of chemistry at the School of istry honors fraternity at the University of Alabama. In 2003 Chemistry, University of Nottingham, and prior to this held he received the Pfizer Groton Labs Green Chemistry Award a distinguished Royal Society University Research Fellow- and was presented the Seldon Award by University of Mas- ship (1991-1999). In 2001 he was a recipient of both the sachusetts, Lowell, for his contributions to green chemistry. Jerwood-Salters Environment Award and the Corday-Mor- gan Medal and Award of the Royal Society of Chemistry. In Liz Gron is an associate professor of chemistry at Hendrix 2003 he received a Royal Society–Wolfson Research Merit College. Her research interests focus on green chemistry, Award. Steve’s academic interests focus on the utilization of specifically in the area of organic reactions in near-critical supercritical carbon dioxide for polymer synthesis, polymer water. The research goal is to replace nonrenewable petro- processing and preparation of novel polymeric materials for chemical solvents while exploiting the unique properties of tissue engineering and drug delivery. A more detailed de- extremely hot water to investigate underlying mechanistic scription of his research can be viewed at http://www. interactions between the reactants and the solvent. Addi- nottingham.ac.uk/~pczctg/Index.htm. He has to his credit tionally, Professor Gron has developed educational materi- over 180 academic papers, reviews, and patents, and is also als for the introductory chemistry curriculum. At present, the driving force behind a spin-off company, Critical Phar- this work focuses on designing green experiments that teach maceuticals Ltd., which was founded upon his academic analytical and environmental chemistry to introductory work. Steve obtained a B.Sc. in chemistry from the Victoria chemistry students. She has taught courses in general, ana- University of Manchester in 1986 and a Ph.D. on “Spectros- lytical, and inorganic chemistry while at Hendrix. Liz Gron copy in Liquefied Noble Gases” from the University of earned her B.A. in chemistry at Colgate University and her Nottingham in 1989. Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry with Arthur B. Ellis at the Uni- versity of Wisconsin-Madison, 1987. She was a postdoctoral James (“Jim”) Hutchison is currently professor of chemis- fellow and an industrial research liaison at the Department try and director of the Materials Science Institute at the Uni- of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, before versity of Oregon (UO). Since joining the faculty at UO in starting at Hendrix in 1994. During her latest sabbatical, the fall of 1994, Hutchison and his research group have

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39 APPENDIX D worked to design and make new functional molecules, materi- issues overseas while combining graduate studies with engi- als, and nanomaterials. His specific research interests are neering service in the U.S. Peace Corps. His teaching and preparation and study of nanoscale materials, surface, and research interests are in the areas of sustainability and green polymers for applications such as nanoelectronics, engineering; biological and chemical processes; and water biocompatibility, and environmental remediation. He has pio- and sanitation issues in the developing world. He has also neered the emerging field of green (environmentally friendly) conducted extensive research in developing methods to esti- nanoscience. He is a leading chemical educator, having played mate environmental properties of chemicals based on chemi- key roles in developing the UO’s nation-leading program in cal structure and integrated these estimation methods with green organic chemistry and designing the Materials Science models of environment risk, the economy, and environmen- Institute Graduate Internship Program in Semiconductor Pro- tal fate and transport to evaluate emerging chemicals and cessing. sustainable economic activities. Before joining the faculty at the University of Oregon, Hutchison was a National Science Foundation postdoctoral Kathryn E. Parent is a staff associate for the Green Chem- fellow with Professor Royce W. Murray at the University of istry Institute at the American Chemical Society. Parent leads North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where studied the surface and educational initiatives at GCI. She received her B.S. in chem- electrochemistry of monolayers on gold films and istry from George Fox University in Newberg, Oregon. Fol- nanoparticles. He received his Ph.D. in 1991 at Stanford Uni- lowing graduation she worked as a research assistant at Or- versity under the direction of Dr. James P. Collman, studying egon Health Sciences University. Parent became involved the binding and redox chemistry of hydrogen, oxygen, and with green chemistry in 2000 when she became a graduate dinitrogen by specifically designed cofacial diporphyrin cata- teaching fellow in the Chemistry Department at the Univer- lysts. His undergraduate degree, a B.S. in chemistry, was com- sity of Oregon. She moved to Washington, DC, to begin pleted in 1986 at the University of Oregon. working for GCI in 2002. Her major interests include green chemistry, education, and community outreach. Her recent D. Tyler McQuade, assistant professor of chemistry and efforts include editor for Going Green: Integrating Green chemical biology at Cornell University, began his faculty Chemistry into the Curriculum (2004); conference adminis- position in 2001. He is currently a Dreyfus, 3M, Rohm and trator for the joint meeting of the Second International Con- Haas, Beckman, and NYSTAR Young Investigator and one ference on Green and Sustainable Chemistry and the Ninth of the 2004 MIT Tech Review 100. McQuade was born in Annual Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference Atlanta, GA, and raised in the Santa Cruz mountains of Cali- (2005); and program director for the ACS Summer School fornia. He received a B.S. in chemistry and a B.S. in biology on Green Chemistry (2005). She is a frequent contributor to from the University of California, Irvine, and a Ph.D. in the ACS magazine for student affiliates, Chemistry Maga- chemistry from University of Wisconsin-Madison under the zine. guidance of Professor Samuel Gellman. His education was completed by a NIH Fellowship at MIT with Professor Timo- David R. Shonnard received a Ph.D. in chemical engineer- thy Swager. The McQuade group is focused on creating syn- ing from the University of California, Davis, in 1991 and thetic systems that use site isolation (via encapsulation) and conducted postdoctoral research at Lawrence Livermore selectivity (via recognition) to carry out multistep syntheses National Laboratory (1990-1992). His research and teaching with greater efficiency. The group’s multidisciplinary envi- interests include green engineering, biotechnology and ronment, using tools from biology, chemistry, and materials bioprocessing, enzyme engineering, and environmental life- science, is yielding both polymers and small molecules that cycle impact assessment. At MTU he is a research and edu- will provide the building blocks for the next generation of cation pioneer in areas of environmental impact assessment reagents for sustainable process chemistry. Many of these for chemical products and processes and coauthor of the text- early innovations nucleated the Sustainable Pharmaceutics book Green Engineering: Environmentally Conscious De- enterprise that won Cornell’s Big Red Ventures 2005 Busi- sign of Chemical Processes, Prentice Hall, 2002. He has con- ness Idea Competition. sulted with several major chemical manufacturers (BASF, UOP) on the use of life-cycle assessment to evaluate and James R. Mihelcic is a professor of civil and environmental improve environmental performance. He is the recipient of engineering at Michigan Technological University the 1998 NSF/Lucent Technologies Foundation Industrial (Houghton, MI) and an adjunct graduate faculty member at Ecology Research Fellowship and the 2003 Ray Fahien Southern University and A&M College (Baton Rouge, LA). Award of the American Society for Engineering Education. He also serves as the codirector of the Sustainable Futures He has received over $2 million in research funding at Michi- Institute (www.sfi.mtu.edu) and director of the Master’s In- gan Technological University and published over 50 peer- ternational Program in Civil and Environmental Engineer- reviewed research papers. ing (www.cee.mtu.edu/peacecorps). This latter program al- lows graduate students to work on sustainable development Linda Vanasupa is currently serving as chair of California

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40 APPENDIX D Polytechnic State University’s Materials Engineering De- Corporation for nine years, and then went to UMASS Boston, partment (mate.calpoly.edu) and associate director of Cal where he has started the world’s first green chemistry Ph.D. Poly’s Center for Sustainability in Engineering (csine. program. He is now at the University of Massachusetts, calpoly.edu). As principal investigator of a National Science Lowell, where he directs a large research group working on a Foundation Department-Level Reform grant, she and her diverse set of projects involving green chemistry, using prin- colleagues are exploring the design of engineering learning ciples of crystal engineering, molecular recognition, and self- experiences that promote systems thinking, responsible glo- assembly. His work combines aspects of community out- bal citizenship, and retention of underrepresented individu- reach, government policy, and industrial collaboration. He is als. Her recent research interests have included thin film pro- associate editor of the journal Organic Preparations and Pro- cessing and characterization and materials degradation in cedures International and on the editorial board of Crystal hydrogen fuel cells. Professor Vanasupa has degrees in ma- Engineering and Crystal Growth and Design. He recently re- terial science and engineering (Ph.D. Stanford University, ceived the 2004 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science 1991; M.S. Stanford University, 1987) and metallurgical Mentoring from President Bush and the Outstanding Service engineering (B.S. Michigan Technological University, to Nursing Award from Sigma Theta Tau International Honor 1985). Since joining Cal Poly in 1991, she has received Cal Society of Nursing. He was awarded the American Institute of Poly’s Distinguish Teaching Award (2002-2003), the Chemistry’s Northeast Division’s Distinguished Chemist of Northrop-Gumman Excellence in Teaching and Applied the Year for 2002. His recent patents in the fields of semicon- Research Award (2000-2001), the American Society for ductor design, biodegradable plastics, personal care products, Engineering Education Dow Outstanding New Faculty and polymeric photoresists are examples of how green chem- Award (1997), and the TRW Excellence in Teaching Award istry principles can be immediately incorporated into com- (1992-1993). mercially relevant applications. Professor Warner is coauthor of the book “Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice” and John Warner received his B.S. in chemistry from the Uni- serves on the Board of Directors of the Green Chemistry Insti- versity of Massachusetts, Boston, his M.S. and Ph.D. from tute in Washington, DC. Princeton in organic chemistry. He worked at the Polaroid