Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

JOHN HALTIWANGER (Cochair) is professor of economics at the University of Maryland. Previously, he served as chief economist at the Bureau of the Census. He currently serves as a research associate at the Center for Economic Studies and at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His recent research has exploited the newly created longitudinal establishment and employer-employee matched databases that have been developed at the Census Bureau. This research centers on the process of job and worker reallocation, retooling and restructuring in the U.S. economy, and the connection of these factors to the business cycle and productivity growth. He is the author of the books Job Creation and Destruction and Labor Statistics Measurement Issues. He is a member of the American Economic Association, the Econometric Society, and the American Statistical Association. He serves on the editorial board of Small Business Economics, the Journal of Evolutionary Economics, and the Journal of Macroeconomics. At the National Research Council, he is a member of the Committee on National Statistics. He has an Sc.B. in applied mathematics-economics from Brown University and a Ph.D. in economics from the Johns Hopkins University.


LISA M. LYNCH (Cochair) is the William L. Clayton professor of international economic affairs and former academic dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University. She has published over 50 articles and books in her principal fields of research—labor economics, international human resource management, and applied econometrics. She is currently the deputy chair of



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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff JOHN HALTIWANGER (Cochair) is professor of economics at the University of Maryland. Previously, he served as chief economist at the Bureau of the Census. He currently serves as a research associate at the Center for Economic Studies and at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His recent research has exploited the newly created longitudinal establishment and employer-employee matched databases that have been developed at the Census Bureau. This research centers on the process of job and worker reallocation, retooling and restructuring in the U.S. economy, and the connection of these factors to the business cycle and productivity growth. He is the author of the books Job Creation and Destruction and Labor Statistics Measurement Issues. He is a member of the American Economic Association, the Econometric Society, and the American Statistical Association. He serves on the editorial board of Small Business Economics, the Journal of Evolutionary Economics, and the Journal of Macroeconomics. At the National Research Council, he is a member of the Committee on National Statistics. He has an Sc.B. in applied mathematics-economics from Brown University and a Ph.D. in economics from the Johns Hopkins University. LISA M. LYNCH (Cochair) is the William L. Clayton professor of international economic affairs and former academic dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University. She has published over 50 articles and books in her principal fields of research—labor economics, international human resource management, and applied econometrics. She is currently the deputy chair of

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future the Board of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, chair of the American Economics Association Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession, and executive board member of the Labor and Employment Relations Association. She is the former chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor, chair of the Federal Economics Statistical Advisory Committee, and coeditor of the Journal of Labor Economics. At the National Research Council, she served on the Committee Toward Improved International Labor Standards: Data, Monitoring, and Compliance. She has a B.A. in economics and political science from Wellesley College and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees, both in economics, from the London School of Economics. JOHN M. ABOWD is the Edmund Ezra Day professor of industrial and labor relations at Cornell University, director of the Cornell Institute for Social and Economic Research, distinguished senior research fellow at the Census Bureau, research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and research affiliate at the Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique in Paris. His current research focuses on the creation and use of linked, longitudinal data on employees and employers. In his work at the Census Bureau he provides the scientific leadership for the Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Program, which is creating research data integrating demographic surveys, economic surveys, and administrative data. He has an M.A. and Ph.D., both in economics, from the University of Chicago. PATRICIA M. ANDERSON is professor of economics at Dartmouth College and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Her research includes the use of business microdata, the effects of unemployment insurance payroll taxes on wages and unemployment, the effects on trends in labor force participation and retirement on pensions and social security, and the extent and consequences of job turnover. She is coeditor of the Journal of Human Resources and serves on the editorial board of The B.E. Journals in Economic Analysis and Policy. She also served as a member of the Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee. She has an M.A. and a Ph.D., both in economics, from Princeton University. MATTHEW BARNES is senior economist in the Better Regulation Executive in the Cabinet Office of the United Kingdom. His current work focuses on the measurement and reduction of regulatory burdens on business and the public sector. This includes work to improve the use of analysis used in policy making and research into new policy options to improve outcomes while managing burdens. He was previously at the UK Office for National

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future Statistics, where his work focused on productivity, issues concerning the consistency of data from national accounts and labor market statistics sources, and international comparisons of productivity. He has a B.Sc. in economics and finance from the University of York and an M.Sc. in economics from the University of Essex. STEVEN DAVIS is the William H. Abbott professor of international business and economics at the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, a research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. He previously taught at Brown University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and served as a consultant and researcher at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. His research focuses on job creation and destruction, tax effects on work activity, the distribution of consumption and earnings, the demand for risky assets, and software pricing and design. He is a member of the American Economic Association, the Econometric Society, and the Society of Labor Economists. He is the coauthor of Job Creation and Destruction. He has a B.A. in economics from Portland State University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, both in economics, from Brown University. TIMOTHY DUNNE is senior economic advisor in the Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. He was previously the Chong K. Liew professor of economics at the University of Oklahoma. He also earlier served as the director of research in the Office of the Chief Economist at the Census Bureau. His fields of interest focus on applied microeconomics, industrial organization, labor economics, and the economics of technological change. He has a B.A. in economics and history from the College of William and Mary and a Ph.D. in economics from the Pennsylvania State University. ROBERT M. GROVES is professor of sociology and the director of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. He has published widely on such topics as the impact of mode of data collection, interviewer behavior, and the use of computer assistance on the quality of survey data. He is the author of Survey Errors and Survey Costs and the coauthor of Nonresponse in Household Surveys. At the National Research Council, he has served on seven committees and is a former member of the Committee on National Statistics. He has an M.A. in statistics and an M.A. in sociology from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan. SUSAN HANSON is a professor in the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University. Her current research focuses on understanding how

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future gender, geographic opportunity structures, and geographic rootedness affect entrepreneurship in cities, as well as on understanding the emergence of sustainable versus unsustainable practices in urban areas. She is a past president of the Association of American Geographers and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. She has a B.A. in geography from Middlebury College and a Ph.D. in geography from Northwestern University. CHRISTOPHER MACKIE is a study director with the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT) specializing in economic measurement and statistics. In addition to this study, he led a number of other projects, including those that produced the reports, At What Price? Conceptualizing and Measuring Cost-of-Living and Price Indexes, and Beyond the Market: Designing Nonmarket Accounts for the United States. He has also led a number of CNSTAT initiatives related to national health accounting and to data access, sharing, and confidentiality issues. He is the author of Canonizing Economic Theory. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of North Carolina, and has held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina, North Carolina State University, and Tulane University. ROBERT H. MCGUCKIN, III, was director of Economic Research at The Conference Board. Previously, he served as Chief of the Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Bureau of the Census. His most recent work focused on international comparisons of productivity and research and development, diffusion of information and communication technology, mergers and acquisitions, and economic and business cycle indicators. He received his B.A. in Mathematics from Ithaca College in 1965, his M.A. in Economics from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1968, and his Ph.D. in Economics from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1970. He was a member of the American Economic Association, the National Association of Business Economists, and the American Statistical Association. PAUL D. REYNOLDS is a distinguished visiting professor of management in the College of Business Administration of Florida International University. He also serves as director of the Entrepreneurial Research Institute of the Eugenio Pino and Family Global Entrepreneurship Center. He has been the coordinating principal investigator on a number of research programs, including the Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics and the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor program; both programs have involved consortia of three dozen units and over 100 scholars. Since 1995 he has served as professor of entrepreneurship at the London Business School and as professor of entrepreneurial studies at Babson College; in prior years he taught at a number of universities, including 20 years at the University of Minnesota.

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future He is the author of The Entrepreneurial Process (with Sammis White), Ethics and Social Science Research, Ethical Dilemmas and Social Science Research, and A Primer in Theory Construction. He has an M.B.A. in business, an M.A. in psychology, and a Ph.D. in sociology, all from Stanford University. MARK J. ROBERTS is professor of economics at the Pennsylvania State University. His research focuses on applied microeconomics and industrial organization. He serves on the American Economic Association Census Advisory Committee, the Executive Committee of the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth, and is a research associate for the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is the coeditor of Industrial Evolution in Developing Countries: Micro Patterns of Turnover, Productivity, and Market Structure. He has an A.B. in economics and journalism from Syracuse University and an M.A. and a Ph.D., both in economics, from the University of Wisconsin. NIELS WESTERGAARD-NIELSEN is director of the Center for Corporate and professor of economics at the Aarhus School of Business in Aarhus, Denmark. He also serves as a research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor in Bonn, Germany, and as a member of the Personnel Economics Group of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is country coordinator in a project conducted by Russell Sage Foundation on low-wage work. His research focuses on wage formation at the individual and firm level, matched worker and firm data, personnel economics, and health economics. He is the author of a number of journal articles utilizing the Danish registers for analyses of individual behavior in the traditional areas of economics as well as psychiatry. He is coauthor of The Danish Economy: An International Perspective. He serves as a member of the Scientific Committee of the Work Environment Program, Ministry of Employment, and is a member of the Danish Government Committee on Work Life Balance. He has an M.Sc. in economics from the University of Aarhus and a Ph.D. from the University of Copenhagen. KIRK WOLTER is senior fellow and director of the Center for Excellence in Survey Research at the National Opinion Research Council, where he previously served as senior vice president for statistics and methodology. He is also professor of statistics at the University of Chicago. During his career, he has led or participated in the design of many of America’s largest information systems, including the Current Business Surveys, the Current Employment Statistics program, the Current Population Survey, the 1980 and 1990 decennial censuses, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, and the National Resources Inventory. He is a fellow of the Ameri-

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future can Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and past president of the International Association of Survey Statisticians and of the Survey Research Methods Section of the American Statistical Association. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in statistics, both from Iowa State University.

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