Index

A

ACES. See Annual Capital Expenditures Survey

ACS. See American Community Survey program

Administrative Conference, 88

Administrative data, building registers primarily from, 5, 7071

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 141n

Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS), 148149

Alternative models, building registers primarily from administrative data, 7071

American Community Survey (ACS) program, 41, 98, 101, 147148

American Time Use Survey (ATUS), 78, 101, 147, 150, 161

Annual Capital Expenditures Survey (ACES), 35, 58, 97, 153154

Annual Refiling Survey (ARS), 129

Annual Report on Family Farms, 149

Annual Survey of Manufacturers, 99, 126

Assets, ownership structure of, 37

ATUS. See American Time Use Survey

Australian Bureau of Statistics, 104

Australian Tax Office, 51

B

BEA. See Bureau of Economic Analysis

BED. See Business Employment Dynamics program

Births and deaths, firm

administrative definitions, 3335

identifying, 2935, 126, 131, 139

legal and production-oriented concepts, 3133

BITS. See Business Information Tracking Series

BLS. See Bureau of Labor Statistics

BMF. See Business Master File

Burden budget system, 52

Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), 79, 24, 6567, 8081, 90, 111113, 149, 153

Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 78, 14, 24, 33, 4142, 51, 5354, 56, 6566, 7075, 8081, 90, 111, 160162

American Time Use Survey, 78, 101, 147, 150, 161

Business Employment Dynamics program, 14, 36, 70, 75, 77, 83, 131, 133, 135, 160

Business List, 127129

Current Employment Statistics, 161



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OCR for page 179
Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future Index A ACES. See Annual Capital Expenditures Survey ACS. See American Community Survey program Administrative Conference, 88 Administrative data, building registers primarily from, 5, 70–71 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 141n Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS), 148–149 Alternative models, building registers primarily from administrative data, 70–71 American Community Survey (ACS) program, 41, 98, 101, 147–148 American Time Use Survey (ATUS), 78, 101, 147, 150, 161 Annual Capital Expenditures Survey (ACES), 35, 58, 97, 153–154 Annual Refiling Survey (ARS), 129 Annual Report on Family Farms, 149 Annual Survey of Manufacturers, 99, 126 Assets, ownership structure of, 37 ATUS. See American Time Use Survey Australian Bureau of Statistics, 104 Australian Tax Office, 51 B BEA. See Bureau of Economic Analysis BED. See Business Employment Dynamics program Births and deaths, firm administrative definitions, 33–35 identifying, 29–35, 126, 131, 139 legal and production-oriented concepts, 31–33 BITS. See Business Information Tracking Series BLS. See Bureau of Labor Statistics BMF. See Business Master File Burden budget system, 52 Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), 7–9, 24, 65–67, 80–81, 90, 111–113, 149, 153 Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 7–8, 14, 24, 33, 41–42, 51, 53–54, 56, 65–66, 70–75, 80–81, 90, 111, 160–162 American Time Use Survey, 78, 101, 147, 150, 161 Business Employment Dynamics program, 14, 36, 70, 75, 77, 83, 131, 133, 135, 160 Business List, 127–129 Current Employment Statistics, 161

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future Current Population Survey, 28n, 40–41, 59, 78, 98, 101, 139–140, 142–143, 150, 162 industry codes, 82 Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, 139, 141–142, 162 Longitudinal Database on Businesses, 110 Multiple Worksite Reports system, 33, 42, 72, 81, 128–129 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 78–79, 143 Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, 7, 35, 71–72, 124, 127–129, 133–134, 160 Quarterly Unemployment Insurance, 124 recommendations for, 5–9, 95–97, 103–107, 110 Business creation data coverage of, 142–148 processes of, 69 Business Data Linking Project (UK), 57 Business data sets, 158–159 Dun and Bradstreet, 167 Federal Reserve Board, 167 flexibility of, 46, 49 Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Consortium, 168 Internal Revenue Service, 168 Kauffman Foundation, 169–170 Small Business Administration, 170–171 Standard & Poor’s, 171 U.S. Census Bureau, 163–166, 170–171 uses and challenges of, 17–19 Business definitions, 28–46 concept versus existing data collection, 42–45, 152 conclusions, 45–46 defining business units and identifying births and deaths, 29–35 defining business units for the purpose of measuring dynamics, 35–42 Business dynamics, 6–7, 116 defining business units for the purpose of measuring, 35–42 literature on, 36 processes of, 69 value of studying, 19–21 Business Employment Dynamics (BED) program, 14, 36, 70, 75, 77, 83, 131, 133, 135, 160 Business Establishment List (BEL). See Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) Business identifiers, unique, 54–55 Business Information Tracking Series (BITS), 138, 171 Business list-based sources of longitudinal microdata, 130–136 BLS’s Business Employment Dynamics Program, 14, 36, 70, 75, 77, 83, 131, 133, 135, 160 ILBD and precursors, 131–132 Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics Program, 44, 54, 83, 87, 102, 131, 134–136, 166 National Establishment Time Series, 136 Business lists, 60 Census Business Register, 44, 124–127, 163 Dun’s Market Identifiers, 129–130 Business Master File (BMF), 33, 124, 149 Business owners, surveying, 99–100 Business registers, 53–57 building primarily from administrative data, 70–71 consistency and coverage, 69–74 data gaps in, 66 effective data sharing, 55–57 ideal business register characteristics, 53–54 linkages with existing surveys and administrative data, 47 unique business identifiers, 54–55 Business start-ups. See also Nascent businesses overestimating, 39 processes of, 69 tools for studying, 135 Business units administrative definitions, 33–35 defining, 29–35 legal and production-oriented concepts, 31–33 Businesses. See also Nascent businesses; Small businesses; Young businesses defining and tracking over time, 53–57 nonemployee, 30 C Capital expenditures, measuring, 65 CBP. See County Business Patterns Census Business Register, 44, 88, 124–127, 163 Census of Manufacturers, 77n

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future Censuses of Retail, 77 Center for Economic Studies, 83, 114, 127, 131 Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy, 16n Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Employer Health Insurance Survey, 141n CES. See Current Employment Statistics CIPSEA. See Confidentiality Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT), 10, 82, 87n, 88, 108 Community Innovation Survey, 59 Company Organization Survey (COS), 42, 72–74, 81, 125–126, 163 Company Statistics Series, 144 Compustat, 153, 171 Confidentiality laws on, 89 of microdata, 71 policies on, 90, 135 preserving, 84, 114 principle of, 3, 23–24, 49 Confidentiality Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act (CIPSEA), 8–9, 23–24, 80, 87, 105–107, 111– 112 Congress, 89–90 Congressional Budget Office, 9 Coordination, of the business lists, 105–107 Corporations, 30, 33, 144 COS. See Company Organization Survey Cost efficiency principle of, 4, 26–27 recommendations concerning, 11 Council of Economic Advisors, 90, 113 County Business Patterns (CBP), 67, 72, 127 CPS. See Current Population Survey Credit reports, 67 Cross-sectional perspective, 36 Current data collections business data sets, 158–159 business list-based sources of longitudinal microdata, 130–136 counting firms and cataloging essential characteristics, 124–130 data coverage of special sectors, 148– 152 data on the self-employed, entrepreneurs and business gestation, 142–148 data sources designed to improve coverage of small and young businesses, 136–139 employment statistics, 139–142 financial data, 153–154 overview of, 123–171 Current data coverage, stylized depiction of, 68 Current Employment Statistics (CES), 61, 140–141, 161 Employment & Earnings, 141 Current Population Survey (CPS), 28n, 40–41, 59, 78, 98, 101, 139–140, 142–143, 150, 162 Current business data system, 13–15 D D&B. See Dun and Bradstreet Data access issues, 115, 129, 140 access issues abroad, 85 administrative, 5, 70–71 expanding the use of, 108–110 gaps in, 151 linking survey and administrative sources, 100–105 longitudinal, 63, 135, 143 survey, 135 Data and statistics on business dynamics, 92–116 changing the data sharing environment to realize systemic efficiency, 110–113 expanding data sources for measuring business dynamics, 94–100 more effective use of existing information, 100–110 recommendation priorities and costs, 113–116 Data coverage of special sectors, 148–152 Agricultural Resource Management Survey, 148–149 electronic commerce, 151–152 nonprofit organizations, 149–151 Data coverage of the self-employed, 142–148 American Community Survey, 41, 98, 101, 147–148 American Time Use Survey, 78, 101, 147, 150, 161 Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, 146 household surveys, 142–144

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future Panel Study on Entrepreneurial Dynamics, 145 Survey of Business Owners, 79, 144, 166 Data coverage of young and small businesses, 67–76 business register consistency and coverage, 69–74 register-based business dynamics programs, 75–76 Data gaps in business dynamics, 77–79 in business registers, 66 Data masking, 85 Data sharing among agencies changing the environment to realize systemic efficiency, 110–113 effectiveness of, 55–57 history of, 87–91 Data sources designed to improve coverage of small and young businesses, 136– 139 Kauffman Firm Survey, 138–139 Small Business Administration-funded data sources, 137–138 Survey of Small Business Finances, 79– 80, 129, 136–137, 167 Data sources for measuring business dynamics, 94–100 nascent business activity, 97–99 sampling young and small firms, 94–97 surveying business owners, 99–100 Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS), 129–130 Deactivation, of firms, 32 Deaths. See Births and deaths Deficiencies, principle of targeting, 4, 26 Defining business units, 28–46 identifying births and deaths, 29–35 identifying nascent businesses, 40–42 producer dynamics, 37–40 for the purpose of measuring dynamics, 35–42 Demographic surveys, 60–61 Denmark, 53, 70, 85 Design principles, 47–53 managing respondent burden, 50–53 recognizing and responding to multiple user needs, 48–49 Dow Jones, Venture One, 153 Dun & Bradstreet (D&B), 7, 41, 70, 80, 124, 129–130, 136, 139, 154, 167 Duns Market Identifiers (DMI), 129–130, 167 E eBay, 28 Economic Census, 72–73, 164 Economic Planning and Coordination Division (EPCD), 48 Economic Report of the President, 90 Economic Research Service (ERS), 148 Economic Statistics Initiative, 89 Effectiveness of data sharing, 55–57 Effectiveness of use of existing information, 100–110 coordinating the business lists, 105–107 expanding the use of data, 108–110 linking survey and administrative data sources, 100–105 EIN. See Employer Identification Number Electronic commerce (e-commerce), 62, 151–152 gaps in data on, 151 Employee businesses, 30 Employee Characteristic File, 134 Employee leasing firms, 81 Employer Human Capital File, 134 Employer Identification Number (EIN), 33–34, 70, 73–74, 96–97, 109, 129, 131–133, 151 application information, 125 data based on, 34, 43 Employer Quarterly Workforce Indicators, 134 Employment & Earnings, 141 Employment History File, 134 Employment statistics, 139–142 Current Employment Statistics, 140–141 Current Population Survey, 28n, 40–41, 59, 78, 98, 101, 140, 142–143, 150, 162 Job Openings and Labor Turnover Program, 139, 141–142, 162 Enterprise Statistics Program, 67 Entrepreneurial activity, 38, 61, 92 identifying, 78 “screener” questions about, 60 Entrepreneurs data coverage of, 142–148 defining, 143

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future EPCD. See Economic Planning and Coordination Division Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines, 31 ERS. See Economic Research Service Establishments, 34 European Union, 59 Eurostat, 59, 63n Expanding Access to Research Data: Reconciling Risks and Opportunities, 82, 88 Extensible business reporting language (XBRL), 51, 104 F Federal Economics Statistics Advisory Committee, 101, 114 Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council, 51 Federal Reserve Board (FRB), 8–9, 13, 21, 25, 81, 167 Survey of Consumer Finances, 86 Survey of Small Business Finances, 79–80, 129, 136–137, 167 Federal Reserve Open Market Committee (FOMC), 21–22 Federal Reserve System, 18, 113 recommendations for, 109 Federal Trade Commission, 35, 91 Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB), 153 Financial data, 55, 153–154 Firm-level data, 66 Firms age of, 40 corporations, 30 deactivation of, 32 defining, 36 employee businesses, 30 employee leasing, 81 new, 38 nonemployee businesses, 30 parent, 37 partnerships, 30 sole proprietorships, 30 venture capital-sponsored, 41 Fixed panel surveys, 63 Flexibility, of business data sets, 46, 49 FOMC. See Federal Reserve Open Market Committee Food and Agriculture Act, 149 FRB. See Federal Reserve Board French National Institute for Statistics and Economic Studies, 83 G GAO. See U.S. General Accountability Office Germany, 85 Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) Consortium, 41, 146, 168 Globalization, 1, 18, 109 Gross domestic income (GDI), 74 Gross domestic product (GDP), 74, 90, 124 H HM Revenue and Customs (UK), 51 House Subcommittees of the Census Committee on Government Reform, 91 on Government Management Information and Technology, 91 Household surveys, 5, 142–144, 147 Current Population Survey, 28n, 40–41, 59, 78, 98, 101, 139–140, 142–143, 150, 162 disadvantages of, 79 Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurial Activity, 143–144 “virtual,” 86 Hurricane Katrina, 15n, 17, 22, 49, 94 I Ideal business data system, 47–64 contents of, 57–60 defining and tracking businesses over time—the business register, 53–57 guiding design principles, 47–53 Ideal business register characteristics, 53–54 Ideal data collection characteristics, 57–64 contents of the ideal business data system, 57–60 how long a sample business should be measured, 62–64 how to allocate the sample of business entities, 61–62 whom to survey, 60–61

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future ILBD. See Integrated Longitudinal Business Database Improving measurement of business dynamics through efficient use of existing information sources, recommendations concerning, 6–7 Imputation methods, 87 Individual proprietorships, 30, 33, 79, 112, 144, 148 Industry codes, 82 Informal funding, 42 Information, effective use of existing, 100–110 Insurance reimbursement codes, 54 Integrated Longitudinal Business Database (ILBD), 75–76, 96, 102, 110, 130– 132, 135, 165 and precursors, 75–76, 131–132 Interagency data, insufficient coordination of, 79–82 Internal Revenue Code, 9, 90, 112 Internal Revenue Service (IRS), 7, 41, 43, 51, 70, 89, 104, 124, 126, 168 Business Master File, 33, 124, 149 forms filed with, 144, 150 Statistics and Income Division, 86 Statistics of Income, 153, 168 Internal Revenue Service Restructuring and Reform Act, 90 International Data Corporation, 152 J Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) program, 139, 141–142, 162 Job vacancies, 142 Johns Hopkins Center for Civic Society Studies, 150 Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT), 90–91 K Kauffman Financial and Business Database (KFBD), 153, 170 Kauffman Firm Survey (KFS), 138–139, 169 Kauffman Foundation, 78, 124n, 138, 145, 154, 169–170 Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics, 169 Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurial Activity, 143–144 L Labor Market Information Cooperative Agreement, 80n LBD. See Longitudinal Business Database LEEM. See Longitudinal Establishment and Enterprise Microdata LEHD. See Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics program Life-cycle processes, 5, 64, 69, 135 Limitations of the current data system for measuring business dynamics, 65–91 data coverage of young and small businesses, 67–76 data-sharing history, 87–91 gaps in data on business dynamics and on small, young, and nascent firms, 77–79 systemic deficiencies, 79–87 Lines of business, 30, 35 Local Employment Dynamics program, 135 Longitudinal Business Database (LBD), 14–15, 70, 75–77, 110, 114, 165 Longitudinal data, 63, 135, 143 Longitudinal Database on Businesses, 110 Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) program, 44, 54, 75–76, 83, 87, 102, 131, 134–136, 166 Longitudinal Establishment and Enterprise Microdata (LEEM), 138, 152. See also Business Information Tracking Series Longitudinal microdata, 75 business list-based sources of, 130–136 Longitudinal Research Database (LRD), 131, 164 M Market transactions, 32 Markets, product, 37 Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., 139, 169 Measurement of business dynamics, 64 defining business units for the purpose of, 35–42

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future Measurement units in business statistics, 30 corporations, 30 establishments, 30 firms, 30 industries, 30 lines of business, 30 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 141n Mergers, horizontal, 39 Metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), 125 Micro-macro links, 66 Microdata, 58, 73, 76, 95, 103–104, 150– 151 availability of, 140 confidential, 71, 144 longitudinal, 75, 130–136 synthetic public-use, 86 Microsoft Corp., 152 Military base closings, 22, 94 Morgan Stanley, Inc., 91 Multi-location employees, 128 Multiple user needs, recognizing and responding to, 48–49 Multiple Worksite Reports (MWR) system, 33, 42, 72, 81, 128–129 N NAICS. See North American Industry Classification System Nascent businesses, 60 essential role of household-based data, 97–99 identifying, 5, 40–42, 98 prevalence rates for, 145 recommendations concerning expanding data on, 4–6 Nathan Associates, 152 National Academy of Sciences, 90 National Agricultural Statistical Service, 148 National Association for Business Economics (NABE), 91 National drug codes, 54 National Employer Health Insurance Survey, 141n National Establishment Time Series (NETS), 136 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), 78–79, 143 National Opinion Research Center, 86 National Performance Review (NPR), 89 National Research Council, 81, 87 National Science Foundation, 103, 134 Research and Development Survey, 97 National Taxonomy of Exempt Entities (NTEE), 150 The Netherlands, 53 New firms, 38 New technologies, 104 NLSY. See National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Non-Employer Statistics (NES), 127 “Nonbusiness” data, 100 Nonemployer businesses, 30, 48, 78, 95, 112, 114, 126, 132, 141 Nonprofit organizations, 149–151 Nontax-exempt organizations, 29n North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), 73, 75, 96, 107, 126–127, 133, 140, 150, 152, 154 Norway, 85 NPR. See National Performance Review NTEE. See National Taxonomy of Exempt Entities O Office of Business Economics, 67 Office of Management and Budget, 113, 124 recommendations for, 104 Office of National Statistics (ONS), 57 Office of Tax Policy, 91 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) report, 63n, 146 Organizations nonprofit, 149–151 nontax-exempt, 29n Ownership structure of assets, 37 of businesses, 55n P Panel on Measuring Business Formation, Dynamics, and Performance, 2, 16 scope of study, 15–17 work of, 23–27 Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics (PSED), 41n, 60n, 145, 169 Panel Study of Income Dynamics, 79

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future Panel surveys, rotating and fixed, 63–64 Paperwork Reduction Act, 89 Parent firms, 37 Partnerships, 30, 33, 79, 144, 148, 153 Payroll Establishment Survey. See Current Employment Statistics Payroll processing firms, 50–51, 64 Personal Characteristics File, 134 Principles, 3–4 confidentiality, 3, 23–24, 93 cost efficiency, 4, 26–27, 93 public purpose, 3–4, 24–25, 93 targeting deficiencies, 4, 26, 93 Principles and Practices for a Federal Statistical Agency, 24, 100, 110 Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics, 87 PRN (permanent random number) system, 52 Produce price index (PPI), 124 Producer dynamics, 37–40 assessment of, 37–40 Producers, tracking the history of, 39 Product markets, 37 “Productive organization,” 31–32 Professional employer organizations (PEOs), 81 PSED. See Panel Study of Entrepreneurial Dynamics Public purpose, principle of, 3–4, 24–25, 93 Public-use microdata, synthetic, 86 Q Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW), 7, 35, 71–72, 124, 127–129, 133–134, 160 limitations of, 128 micro files from, 139 Quarterly Unemployment Insurance, 124 Quarterly Workforce Indicators (QWI), 14, 36, 77, 135–136 R Railroad Retirement Act, 148 RAND Corp., 124n RDCs. See Research data centers Recommendations, 4–11, 92–116 for the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 5–9, 95–97, 103–107, 110 for the Census Bureau, 5–7, 95–108, 110 costs and priorities, 11, 113–116 expanding data on young and nascent businesses, 4–6 for the Federal Reserve System, 109–110 improving measurement of business dynamics through efficient use of existing information sources, 6–7 improving the business lists through interagency data sharing, 7–9 increasing the value of data collection by expanding use, 9–11 for the Office of Management and Budget, 104 Reconciliation, 107 Register-based business dynamics programs, 75–76 Report on Administrative Procedures of the Internal Revenue Service … to the Administrative Conference of the United States, 88 “Report to Congress on the Availability of Credit to Small Business,” 137, 152 Research data centers (RDCs), 127, 132, 136 Researcher access, inadequate, 82–87 Respondent burden, managing, 50–53 R.G. Dun and Company, 67 Rotating panel surveys, 63–64 S S-corporations, 30, 33, 79 Sampling errors, 95 SBA. See U.S. Small Business Administration SBO. See Survey of Business Owners Scandanavia, 70 Scanner data, 64 SCF. See Survey of Consumer Finances Schedule C filings, 6, 56, 99, 143, 153 Schedule C-EZ filings, 130 “Screener” questions, about entrepreneurial activities, 5, 60 Self-employed, 32, 138, 148 categories of, 58 data coverage of, 142–148 initiatives of, 40

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future SESAs. See State employment security agencies SIC codes, 152, 154 Small businesses applications that would be advanced by further development of data on, 21–23 data coverage of, 67–76 data sources designed to improve coverage of, 136–139 sampling, 94–97 Social Security Administration (SSA), 54, 70, 87, 124, 128, 132, 143, 148 SOI. See Statistics of Income Sole proprietorships, 30, 33, 79, 112, 144, 148, 153 Special sectors, data coverage of, 148–152 SRS. See Statistical Research Service SSA. See Social Security Administration SSBF. See Survey of Small Business Finances SSEL. See Standard Statistical Establishment List Standard & Poor’s (S&P), 171 Compustat, 153, 171 Standard Statistical Establishment List (SSEL), 88, 124, 131 Start-ups. See Business start-ups State employment security agencies (SESAs), 140 Statistical agencies, 10, 28–29, 43, 59, 65, 93 federal, 13–14, 64, 123 Statistical Agencies: Proposed Consolidation and Data Sharing Legislation, 89 Statistical Efficiency Act, 91 Statistical Research Service (SRS), 16, 88 Statistics and Income Division (IRS), 86 Statistics Canada, 152 Statistics Denmark, 70–71, 84–85 Statistics of Income (SOI), 153, 168 Statistics of U.S. Businesses (SUSB), 5, 70, 75–77, 96, 114, 138, 170 Subchapter S-corporations, 30, 33, 79 Survey of Business Owners (SBO), 79, 97, 99–100, 144, 166 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF), 86 Survey of New Business Dynamics, 62 Survey of Small Business Finances (SSBF), 79–80, 129, 136–137, 167 Survey subjects, 60–61 Surveys. See also Panel surveys demographic and economic, 60 Surveys of Minority and Women Owned Business Enterprises, 144 Company Statistics Series, 144 SUSB. See Statistics of U.S. Businesses “Sweat equity,” 42 Sweden, 52, 85 Synthetic data approach, 85–86, 110 Synthetic public-use microdata, 86 Systemic deficiencies, 79–87 inadequate researcher access, 82–87 insufficient interagency data coordination, 79–82 T Technologies, new, 104 Topical modules, 7 Total Entrepreneurial Activity Index, 146 Tracking businesses over time, business list-based sources of longitudinal microdata, 130–136 Transitions, measurement of, 5–6, 58, 94 U Understanding the Digital Economy conference, 152 Unemployment Insurance (UI) system, 7, 33, 43–44, 54, 72, 81, 127–128 United Kingdom (UK), 52, 55–56 Business Data Linking Project, 57 HM Revenue and Customs, 51 Office of National Statistics, 57 Universal product codes, 54 University of Chicago, National Opinion Research Center, 86 University of Michigan, 169 Institute for Social Research, 145 Panel Study on Entrepreneurial Dynamics, 41n Urban Institute, 83n Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy, 16n National Center for Charitable Statistics, 151 U.S. Census Bureau, 7–8, 24–26, 34–35, 41–44, 51, 53–54, 56, 65–66, 70, 72–76, 80–81, 83, 90, 111, 163–166, 170–171 Annual Capital Expenditures Survey, 35, 58, 97, 153–154

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Understanding Business Dynamics: An Integrated Data System for America’s Future Business Register, 44, 88, 124–127, 163 Center for Economic Studies, 83, 114, 127, 131 Company Organization Survey, 42, 72–74, 81, 125–126, 163 County Business Patterns, 67, 72, 127 Economic Census, 164 Economic Planning and Coordination Division, 48 Enterprise Statistics Program, 67 Integrated Longitudinal Business Database, 75–76, 96, 102, 110, 130–132, 135, 165 Longitudinal Business Database, 5, 14–15, 70, 75–77, 110, 165 Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics, 44, 54, 75–76, 83, 87, 102, 131, 134–136, 166 Longitudinal Research Database, 131, 164 Non-Employer Statistics, 127 Quarterly Workforce Indicators, 14, 36, 77, 135–136 recommendations for, 5–7, 95–108, 110 research data centers, 127, 132, 136 Standard Statistical Establishment List, 88, 124, 131 Statistics of U.S. Businesses, 5, 70, 75–77, 96, 114, 138, 170 Survey of Business Owners, 79, 97, 99–100, 144, 166 Surveys of Minority and Women Owned Business Enterprises, 144 U.S. Code, Title 13, 125, 132, 144 U.S. Commerce Department, 89 E-Stats web site, 152 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistical Service, 148 Statistical Research Service, 16n, 88 U.S. General Accountability Office (GAO), 88–89 U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), 48, 75, 170–171 Business Information Tracking Series, 171 data sources funded by, 137–138 Statistics of U.S. Businesses, 138, 170 U.S. Treasury Department, 89–90, 112 Office of Tax Policy, 91 User needs, multiple, recognizing and responding to, 48–49 V Value-added tax (VAT), 70 Venture capital-sponsored firms, 41 Venture Economics, 153 Venture One, 153 “Virtual households/businesses,” 86 W Walls and Associates, 136 Web-based reporting, 104 “Work,” defining, 147 X XBRL. See Extensible business reporting language (XBRL) Y Yankee Group, 152 Young businesses applications that would be advanced by further development of data on, 21–23 data coverage of, 5, 67–76 data sources designed to improve coverage of, 136–139 recommendations concerning expanding data on, 4–6 sampling, 94–97 Z ZIP Code Business Patterns statistical series, 127