Concluding Remarks

Jacques S. Gansler

University of Maryland


In calling the conference to a close, Dr. Gansler noted that the broader goal of the SBIR program is for the results of research to be utilized. The idea was not to emphasize Phase III at the expense of Phases I and II, but to do it in addition to Phases I and II. Every science and technology organization faced the same challenge of finding the right balance between the “R” and the “D.”

In fact, he concluded, research needs vigorous emphasis at every level— certainly at the level that produces revolutionary ways of doing things—if we as a nation are going to maintain our leadership in technological innovation and economic development.



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SBIR and the Phase III Challenge of Commercialization: Report of a Symposium Concluding Remarks Jacques S. Gansler University of Maryland In calling the conference to a close, Dr. Gansler noted that the broader goal of the SBIR program is for the results of research to be utilized. The idea was not to emphasize Phase III at the expense of Phases I and II, but to do it in addition to Phases I and II. Every science and technology organization faced the same challenge of finding the right balance between the “R” and the “D.” In fact, he concluded, research needs vigorous emphasis at every level— certainly at the level that produces revolutionary ways of doing things—if we as a nation are going to maintain our leadership in technological innovation and economic development.