Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

David M. Ozonoff, Chair, is a professor in and chair emeritus of the Department of Environmental Health at Boston University’s School of Public Health. He is also a professor in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences and Community Medicine at Boston University’s School of Medicine. His research centers on health effects on communities exposed to various kinds of toxic chemicals, new approaches to understanding the results of small case-control studies, and the effects of exposure misclassification in environmental epidemiology. He has studied public health effects resulting from exposure to a number of contaminated sites. He is the editor-in-chief of the online journal Environmental Health. He is also a member of the Massachusetts Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Program, and he served on the NRC Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants and the Panel on Water System Security Research. Dr. Ozonoff received his M.D. from Cornell University and his M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.


Francis A. DiGiano is a professor of environmental sciences and engineering at the University of North Carolina. Previously, he was also a member of the faculty at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His areas of research include water treatment, wastewater treatment, water distribution systems, wastewater reuse, activated carbon adsorption, membrane separations, biodegradation, water quality, natural environmental systems, and engineered environmental systems. Dr. DiGiano has also developed technology for treatment of water and wastewater with an emphasis on physical and chemical separation processes for organic contaminants. His most recent research includes experimental measurements and mathematical modeling of bacterial regrowth in distribution systems and fundamental studies of submerged membrane technology. He received a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of



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Improving the Nation’s Water Security: Opportunities for Research Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff David M. Ozonoff, Chair, is a professor in and chair emeritus of the Department of Environmental Health at Boston University’s School of Public Health. He is also a professor in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences and Community Medicine at Boston University’s School of Medicine. His research centers on health effects on communities exposed to various kinds of toxic chemicals, new approaches to understanding the results of small case-control studies, and the effects of exposure misclassification in environmental epidemiology. He has studied public health effects resulting from exposure to a number of contaminated sites. He is the editor-in-chief of the online journal Environmental Health. He is also a member of the Massachusetts Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Program, and he served on the NRC Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants and the Panel on Water System Security Research. Dr. Ozonoff received his M.D. from Cornell University and his M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Francis A. DiGiano is a professor of environmental sciences and engineering at the University of North Carolina. Previously, he was also a member of the faculty at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His areas of research include water treatment, wastewater treatment, water distribution systems, wastewater reuse, activated carbon adsorption, membrane separations, biodegradation, water quality, natural environmental systems, and engineered environmental systems. Dr. DiGiano has also developed technology for treatment of water and wastewater with an emphasis on physical and chemical separation processes for organic contaminants. His most recent research includes experimental measurements and mathematical modeling of bacterial regrowth in distribution systems and fundamental studies of submerged membrane technology. He received a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of

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Improving the Nation’s Water Security: Opportunities for Research Massachusetts, Amherst, an M.S. from Tufts University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Charles N. Haas is the L.D. Betz Professor of Environmental Engineering, and Head of the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering at Drexel University. His areas of research involve microbial and chemical risk assessment, chemical fate and transport, hazardous waste processing and disposal practices, industrial wastewater treatment, and water and wastewater disinfection processes. Dr. Haas is currently conducting research on disinfection processes, water microbiology, and microbial risk assessment (including of special agents). He has coauthored 14 books or major works on water and wastewater treatment and/or microbial risk assessment. Dr. Haas is currently a member of the Water Science and Technology Board and a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, the Society for Risk Analysis, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Public Water Supply Distribution Systems, the Panel on Water System Security Research, and the Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants. Dr. Haas received a B.S. in biology and an M.S. in environmental engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Illinois. Anna K. Harding is an associate professor in the Department of Public Health at Oregon State University. Her expertise lies in the area of environmental health and includes water quality, public health interventions associated with chemical contamination, community involvement, and communication. Additionally, her research interests include international environmental health and the health of special populations. Dr. Harding’s current projects include developing regional exposure scenarios for tribal communities engaged in subsistence lifestyles and the Technical Outreach Services for Communities program. Recent work has also covered topics such as drinking water quality and solar disinfection, evaluating microbial indicators of environmental conditions in rivers, and water quality monitoring for public health and environmental protection. During the past five years, Dr. Harding also worked as a visiting scientist of the Environmental Policy and Risk Management Group at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. She received her B.S. in community health and health education from the University of Oregon, Eugene, and her Ph.D. in public health from Oregon State University.

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Improving the Nation’s Water Security: Opportunities for Research Dennis D. Juranek recently retired as a senior scientist and epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he worked since 1970. He worked on various aspects of waterborne diseases including investigation of numerous outbreaks of Giardia and Cryptosporidium, analysis of national data on waterborne disease outbreaks reported to CDC, and participation in epidemiologic studies to establish a national estimate of the occurrence of waterborne disease. Dr. Juranek worked for several years on issues related to waterborne bioterrorism, and in 2000 he organized and chaired the first multiagency, multiorganizational working group on infectious agents and biotoxins that might be used to intentionally contaminate drinking water. The focus of the working group was to identify the biological agents of greatest concern to drinking water and to identify and resolve data gaps about these agents that could impede a rapid and effective public health response to a contamination event or a terrorist threat against drinking water. Dr. Juranek served on the NRC’s Committee on Small Water Supply Systems. He also serves as a faculty member in the Division of Public Health at Emory University. Dr. Juranek received an M.Sc. in medical parasitology from the London School of Tropical Medicine and a D.V.M. in Veterinary Medicine from Colorado State University. Nancy K. Kim is director of the New York State Department of Health’s Division of Environmental Health Assessment, which is responsible for assessing the potential risk for adverse health effects from exposure to toxic substances in homes and communities. Dr. Kim is also an associate professor in the School of Public Health at the State University of New York, Albany. Her research interests include chemical risk assessment, exposure assessment, toxicological evaluations, structure-activity relationships, and quantitative relationships among toxicological parameters. Prior to her current position, Dr. Kim served as the director of the Bureau of Toxic Substance Assessment for the New York State Department of Health and as a research scientist in the Department’s Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research where she evaluated the toxicity of chemicals and developed human health guidelines for chemicals in air, food, and water. She previously served on the NRC Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants. Dr. Kim received her B.A. in chemistry from the University of Delaware and her M.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from Northwestern University.

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Improving the Nation’s Water Security: Opportunities for Research Bruce M. Larson is a career security and risk management professional with 17 years of leadership experience protecting critical infrastructure in the telecommunications, power, water, and government sectors. He currently serves as the Director of Security Programs for American Water and is responsible for integrating and coordinating physical security, information security, crisis management, business continuity, and personnel surety programs across the global operations of RWE Thames Water. RWE Thames is a wholly owned subsidiary of the RWE Group and is the third largest water services provider in the world. Mr. Larson is a council member of the Water Sector Coordination Council. Daniel V. Lim is Distinguished University Professor of Microbiology in the Department of Biology and the Center for Biological Defense at the University of South Florida. The primary focus of his research is the characterization of virulence mechanisms in pathogenic bacteria and development of innovative technologies to rapidly detect and identify infectious diseases and bacterial pathogens in food, water, air, and on surfaces. His current research involves the development of fiber optic and array biosensor assays for the rapid detection of pathogenic microorganisms. These innovative assays have been used to successfully detect Bacillus spores, E. coli, and other microorganisms directly from ground beef, apple juice, powder, and potable water. Dr. Lim is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and recently received the Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation’s 2004 Homeland Security Award in the biological, radiological, and nuclear field. He received a B.A. in biology from Rice University and a Ph.D. in microbiology from Texas A&M University. Rudolph V. Matalucci, P.E., is president of Rudolph Matalucci Consultants, Inc., a firm that specializes in infrastructure and architectural surety. Prior to starting his own firm, Dr. Matalucci spent 22 years at Sandia National Laboratories where he served as project engineer and manager on engineering design projects, risk assessment methodology developments, and numerous security technology application projects. He is a nationally recognized expert in the development and implementation of risk assessment methodologies for facilities and infrastructure systems, and of Architectural Surety® approaches and methodologies. Before joining Sandia National Laboratories, Dr. Matalucci served in the U.S. Air Force for 20 years where he directed research and development programs for civil engineering design, construction, testing, and evaluation of U.S. Air Force facilities; directed the development of high explo-

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Improving the Nation’s Water Security: Opportunities for Research sive simulations for test and evaluation of nuclear weapons air blast and ground shock effects on weapons protective systems; and directed the engineering design, prototype testing, and construction management of major Department of Defense projects. Dr. Matalucci received a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of New Hampshire, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in civil engineering from Oklahoma State University. David A. Reckhow is professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He also serves as the director of the University of Massachusetts Environmental Institute and interim director of the Massachusetts Water Resources Research Center. His research interests include water and wastewater treatment, physical-chemical processes, water chemistry, and water quality modeling, with special emphasis on disinfection byproducts, the use of ozone for water purification, and new techniques for water quality monitoring. He is a board member of the American Water Works Association Research Foundation, and he previously served on the NRC Panel on Water System Security Research. Dr. Reckhow received his B.S. in civil engineering from Tufts University, his M.S. in civil engineering from Stanford University, and his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of North Carolina. H. Gerard Schwartz, Jr., is currently a senior professor for the Environmental Engineering Science Program at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and a civil/environmental engineering consultant. He was past president of Sverdrup Civil, Inc. and Sverdrup Environmental, Inc., and chair of Jacobs Civil, Inc. Dr. Schwartz was also past president of the Water Environment Federation and founding chair of the Water Environment Research Foundation. His research interests include water and wastewater treatment, study and design of municipal and industrial wastewater treatment systems with special emphasis on high-strength organic wastewater. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Schwartz received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Washington University and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology; he also attended Columbia University’s business program. John P. Sullivan, P.E., is Chief Engineer of the Boston Water & Sewer Commission, a position he has held for 16 years. He has 33 years experience in the design and operation of water distribution and wastewater collection systems. Mr. Sullivan’s work includes planning, design, construction inspection, and implementing the requirements of various regu-

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Improving the Nation’s Water Security: Opportunities for Research lations, including the establishment of monitoring programs. He is a Diplomate in the American Academy of Environmental Engineers in the area of water supply and wastewater and a past president of the Association of Metropolitan Water Agencies. Currently, Mr. Sullivan is chair of the Board of Managers for the Water Information Sharing and Analysis Center (WaterISAC) and a member of the Water Sector Coordinating Council. He holds a B.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and an MBA from Northeastern University. George Tchobanoglous is professor emeritus in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Davis. His principal research interests include wastewater treatment and reuse, wastewater filtration, ultraviolet light disinfection, aquatic wastewater management systems, wastewater management for small and decentralized wastewater management systems, and solid waste management. Most recently, his research efforts have focused on decentralized wastewater management or the collection, treatment, and reuse of wastewater at or near the point of waste generation. He has authored or co-authored over 300 technical publications including 12 textbooks and 2 reference works. He is a former president of the American Association of Environmental Engineers, and he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. In 2003, he was awarded the Clarke Prize for excellence in water research. Dr. Tchobanoglous received his B.S. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of the Pacific, his M.S. degree in Sanitary Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Stanford University. STAFF Stephanie E. Johnson is a senior program officer with the Water Science and Technology Board. Since joining the NRC in 2002, she has served as study director for five committees, including the Panel on Water System Security Research. She has also worked on NRC studies on contaminant source remediation, the disposal of coal combustion wastes, Everglades restoration, and desalination. Dr. Johnson received her B.A. from Vanderbilt University in chemistry and geology, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia on the subject of pesticide transport and microbial bioavailability in soils.

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Improving the Nation’s Water Security: Opportunities for Research Laura J. Ehlers is a senior program officer for the Water Science and Technology Board. Since joining the NRC in 1997, she has served as study director for eleven committees, including the Committee on Public Water Supply Distribution Systems: Assessing and Reducing Risks, the Committee on Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soils and Sediment, and the Committee on Assessment of Water Resources Research. She received her B.S. from the California Institute of Technology, majoring in biology and engineering and applied science. She earned both an M.S.E. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. Her dissertation, entitled RP4 Plasmid Transfer among Strains of Pseudomonas in a Biofilm, was awarded the 1998 Parsons Engineering/Association of Environmental Engineering Professors award for best doctoral thesis. Dorothy K. Weir is a research associate with the Water Science and Technology Board. She has worked on a number of studies including Water Quality Improvement in Southwestern Pennsylvania, Everglades Restoration Progress, and Colorado River Basin Water Management. Ms. Weir received a B.S. in biology from Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee, and an M.S. degree in environmental science and policy from Johns Hopkins University. She joined the NRC in 2003.

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