Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Richard W. Pew (Chair) has been a principal scientist at BBN Technologies in Cambridge, Massachusetts, since 1974 and is currently working part-time there. He has 35 years of experience in human factors, human performance, and experimental psychology as they relate to systems design and development. Throughout his career, he has been involved in the development and use of human performance models and in the conduct of experimental and field studies of human performance in applied settings. Before BBN, he spent 11 years on the faculty of the Psychology Department at the University of Michigan, where he was involved in human performance teaching, research, and consulting. The university has recently created a collegiate chair in his name. He was the first chair of the National Research Council’s Committee on Human Factors. He has been president of the Human Factors Society and of Division 21 of the American Psychological Association. He has a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Cornell University (1956), a master of arts degree in psychology from Harvard University (1960), and a Ph.D. in psychology with a specialization in engineering psychology from the University of Michigan (1963).


Nigel Bevan is an independent usability consultant with wide industrial and research experience. He provides consultancy and training in usability and user-centered design. He was technical coordinator of the EU MUSiC (measurement of usability in context), a project that produced methods for usability measurement, which have since been widely applied commercially. He was manager of the INUSE and RESPECT projects, which set up a network of usability support centers around Europe; the TRUMP project,



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Human-System Integration in the System Development Process: A New Look Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Richard W. Pew (Chair) has been a principal scientist at BBN Technologies in Cambridge, Massachusetts, since 1974 and is currently working part-time there. He has 35 years of experience in human factors, human performance, and experimental psychology as they relate to systems design and development. Throughout his career, he has been involved in the development and use of human performance models and in the conduct of experimental and field studies of human performance in applied settings. Before BBN, he spent 11 years on the faculty of the Psychology Department at the University of Michigan, where he was involved in human performance teaching, research, and consulting. The university has recently created a collegiate chair in his name. He was the first chair of the National Research Council’s Committee on Human Factors. He has been president of the Human Factors Society and of Division 21 of the American Psychological Association. He has a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Cornell University (1956), a master of arts degree in psychology from Harvard University (1960), and a Ph.D. in psychology with a specialization in engineering psychology from the University of Michigan (1963). Nigel Bevan is an independent usability consultant with wide industrial and research experience. He provides consultancy and training in usability and user-centered design. He was technical coordinator of the EU MUSiC (measurement of usability in context), a project that produced methods for usability measurement, which have since been widely applied commercially. He was manager of the INUSE and RESPECT projects, which set up a network of usability support centers around Europe; the TRUMP project,

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Human-System Integration in the System Development Process: A New Look which incorporated user-centered design into the development processes of two large organizations; the PRUE project, which trialed use of the common industry format for usability test reports; and the UsabilityNet project, which established a web site of usability resources. He participates in several international standards groups in which he has introduced the concept of quality in use. He contributed to ISO 13407 and the common industry format and edited ISO 9241-11 (guidance on usability), ISO/IEC 14598-1 (evaluation of software quality—general guide), ISO/IEC 9126-1 (software product quality model), and ISO/IEC 9126-4 (quality in use metrics). He currently edits ISO/IEC 25030 (quality requirements), ISO 20282-2 (usability of everyday products), and the new common industry format for usability requirements. He has a B.Sc. in physics and in psychology from London University, and a Ph.D. in man-machine interaction from the Council for National Academic Awards (CNAA). Barry W. Boehm is TRW professor of software engineering and director of the Center for Software Engineering at the University of Southern California. Between 1989 and 1992, he served in the U.S. Department of Defense as director of the DARPA Information Science and Technology Office and as director of the DDR&E Software and Computer Technology Office. His current research interests focus on value-based software engineering, including a method for integrating a software system’s process models, product models, property models, and success models, called model-based (system) architecting and software engineering (MBASE). His contributions to the field include the constructive cost model (COCOMO), the spiral model of the software process, the theory W (win-win) approach to software management and requirements determination, the foundations for the areas of software risk management and software quality factor analysis, and two advanced software engineering environments: the TRW software productivity system and quantum leap environment. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has a B.A. from Harvard University (1957) and an M.S. (1961) and a Ph.D. (1964) from the University of California, Los Angeles, all in mathematics. He also received an honorary Sc.D. in computer science from the University of Massachusetts in 2000. Kristen A. Butler (research assistant) joined the National Academies in 2005. She is currently the research assistant for the Committee on Human-System Design Support for Changing Technology, the Committee on Human Factors, and the Committee on Organizational Modeling from Individuals to Societies. Prior to working at the National Research Council, she worked as a student co-op in the human factors division of the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center of the U.S. Department of Transportation. She has a B.S. in engineering psychology and biomedical engineering from the Tufts University School of Engineering.

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Human-System Integration in the System Development Process: A New Look Nancy J. Cooke is professor in the Applied Psychology Unit at Arizona State University and is science director and on the board of directors of the Cognitive Engineering Research Institute in Mesa, Arizona. Currently, she supervises graduate and undergraduate research in the Laboratory for Cognitive Engineering Research on Team Tasks. Her research interests include the study of knowledge and its application to the development of cognitive and knowledge engineering methodologies, as well as to expertise, intelligent tutors, human-computer interfaces, and team performance. In particular, she specializes in the development, application, and evaluation of methodologies to elicit and assess individual and team cognition. Her most recent work includes the development and validation of methods to measure shared knowledge and team situation awareness and research on the impact of cross training, distributed mission environments, and workload on team knowledge, process, and performance. She is editor-in-chief of Human Factors. She has a B.A. in psychology from George Mason University and M.A. (1983) and Ph.D. (1987) degrees in cognitive psychology from New Mexico State University. Shelley Evenson is currently associate professor in the area of interaction design in the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University. She has worked for more than 25 years in multidisciplinary consulting practices, working closely with users to develop products that are aesthetically pleasing and usable to them. Her clients include Apple Computer, the Bank of Montreal, Diamond Technologies, Kodak, Texas Instruments, the Williamsburg Institute, and Xerox. She uses rapid prototyping to iteratively reshape solutions and present them to users for interactive evaluation. These prototypes incorporate business strategy and new technologies and are used to transform the users’ experiences of the product and increase product adoption and loyalty. Evenson was cofounder of seeSpace and chief experience strategist for Scient. She served as a board member for the American Center for Design. Her current interests include design languages and strategies, organizational interfaces, design, and the study of what lies beyond user-centered design. She has a B.S. in industrial design from the Ohio State University. Dave Graeber is a human factors engineer at Boeing Phantom Works in Seattle. He has a background that has afforded application of human factors skills, techniques, and concepts to a diverse array of projects spanning complex systems design, business development, project management, and bringing technologies to new markets. Working within a mix of systems engineering and business development environments, his focus centers on the trade space of system design to support end-users and the pragmatic realities of program management. He has a Ph.D. in industrial engineering from the University of Central Florida.

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Human-System Integration in the System Development Process: A New Look Edmond W. Israelski is a human factors program manager at Abbott Laboratories in Abbott Park, Illinois. He has worked as a systems engineer, product manager, market researcher, and industrial/organizational psychologist as well as a human factors engineer. He was technical manager of the human factors systems group at Lucent Technologies—Bell Labs, formerly AT&T. Later he was director of human factors for SBC/Ameritech, where his organization supported the design and evaluation of user interfaces for telecommunications products and services. In 2000, he became chief technology officer at Human Factors International, a user interface design and consulting firm. He joined Abbott Laboratories, a medical device and pharmaceutical company, as program manager of human factors in 2001, where he leads a cross-division team to embed best-practice human factors design methods into all of Abbott’s products to ensure safety and usability. He is a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and cochair of the human factors engineering standards development committee for the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation. He has a B.S. in electrical engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology, an M.S. in operations research from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in industrial and engineering psychology from the Stevens Institute of Technology. Brian M. Kleiner is a professor of industrial and systems engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He also directs the Center for Innovation in Construction Safety and Health. His research interests focus on sociotechnical systems, health and safety and on the analysis and design of work systems and work system interfaces (macroergonomics). This includes function allocation in automation and system design, training/communication/information system, support system design, design of collaborative and distributed work environments, safety and health, and human reliability and decision making in quality control. He has an M.S. (1983) in human factors concentration and a Ph.D. (1990) in industrial engineering (human factors concentration) from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Anne S. Mavor (study director) is the staff director for the Committee on Human Factors and the Committee on Human-System Design Support for Changing Technology. Her previous National Research Council work has included studies on occupational analysis and the enhancement of human performance, modeling human behavior and command decision making, human factors in air traffic control automation, human factors considerations in tactical display for soldiers, scientific and technological challenges of virtual reality, emerging needs and opportunities for human factors research, and modeling cost and performance for purposes of military enlistment. For the past 35 years, her work has concentrated on human factors,

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Human-System Integration in the System Development Process: A New Look cognitive psychology, and information system design. She has an M.S. in experimental psychology from Purdue University. Michael Muller is a research scientist in the Collaborative User Experience group at IBM Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His expertise is in participatory design, having codeveloped participatory practices, such as PICTIVE, CARD, and Participatory Heuristic Evaluation. His current work analyzes knowledge sharing and knowledge management through social software applications in organizations. He has worked in research and practice in usability, user-centered design, and work analysis at Microsoft, U.S. West Advanced Technologies, and Bellcore, and serves on IBM’s Collaboration Invention Development Team. He has a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Rutgers University. Frank E. Ritter is associate professor of information sciences and technology, of psychology, and of computer science and engineering at the Pennsylvania State University. He has received study fellowships from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the European Science Foundation’s Program on Learning in Humans and Machines, and the Fulbright Commission. He has developed software, tutorials, and methodology for cognitive modeling, particularly with Soar and ACT-R, creating models that have tested human-robot interfaces, sample and real telephones, and complex interfaces. He has published widely in the area of cognitive modeling, artificial intelligence, and psychology. He is on the editorial board of Human Factors, AISB Journal, and AISB Quarterly, and is the editor for Oxford University Press’ series on Cognitive Models and Architectures. He has a B.S.E.E. (with honors) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as well as an M.S. in psychology and a Ph.D. in artificial intelligence and psychology from Carnegie Mellon University. Emilie Roth is president of Roth Cognitive Engineering. Her work has involved analysis of human problem solving and decision making in real-world environments (e.g., military command and control, intelligence analysis, monitoring and control of internet networks, nuclear power plant operations, railroad operations, surgery), and the impact of support systems (e.g., computerized procedures, alarm systems, advanced graphical displays, new forms of automation) on performance. She has conducted empirical studies of naturalistic decision making, developed and applied cognitive task analysis and cognitive work analysis techniques for understanding the cognitive demands imposed by work environments, and developed principles for effective decision support for individuals and teams. She has served as part of multidisciplinary design teams developing first-of-a-kind systems, including design and manning of the command center for a next-generation

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Human-System Integration in the System Development Process: A New Look Navy ship, design of a next-generation nuclear power plant control room, and design of work-centered support systems for flight planning and monitoring for an Air Force organization. She is currently serving as editor of the Design of Complex and Joint Cognitive Systems track of the Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making. She has a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Thomas F. Sanquist is a research scientist with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Seattle. His research focuses on the use of analytic and field research methods for designing and evaluating user interfaces for complex systems. Application areas include intelligence analysis, security systems, transportation, imaging devices, satellite control systems, nuclear power plants, and military command and control. He has experience in both the research and practice of human factors engineering, having designed and implemented significant large-scale systems such as the Air Force satellite control network user interface and seaport radiation portal monitoring for Customs and Border Protection. He has a B.A. from the University of Michigan (1974) and a Ph.D. in cognitive and physiological psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles (1980).

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