Appendixes



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Decadal Science Strategy Surveys: Report of a Workshop Appendixes

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Decadal Science Strategy Surveys: Report of a Workshop This page intentionally left blank.

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Decadal Science Strategy Surveys: Report of a Workshop A Workshop Agenda TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2006 Workshop Session 1 (Moderator: Lennard Fisk) 1:15 pm Opening remarks—Lennard Fisk   Welcome, background, and objectives and structure of the workshop 1:30 pm Retrospective summaries of the five recent surveys by representatives of the survey committees—survey approaches, notable successes and difficulties   Survey Committee Panel Astronomy and Astrophysics—Christopher McKee Solar System Exploration—Michael Belton Solar and Space Physics—Louis Lanzerotti Earth Science and Applications from Space—Berrien Moore Connecting Quarks and the Cosmos—Michael Turner Panelists summarize How the survey was organized, Means and extent of community involvement, Sources of input,

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Decadal Science Strategy Surveys: Report of a Workshop   Agencies addressed by the survey, Impacts, Problems, and Approaches recommended for future surveys. 3:50 pm Client perspectives on past surveys—views from agencies and Congress   Panel on Agencies NASA—Mary Cleave NSF—Judith Sunley (via video conferencing) NOAA—Mary Kicza OSTP—Jon Morse Panel on Congress William Adkins Johannes Loschnigg Robert Palmer Panelists discuss views about past surveys with respect to the following attributes: Utility, Impacts, Limitations, and Problems. 5:30 pm Adjourn WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2006 Workshop Session 2 (Moderator: Tom Young) 8:30 am How can surveys deal with costing, technology readiness and risk, and executability? Panelists give perspectives from NASA, industry, and the science community.   Cost and Technology Assessment Panel Steven Battel John Casani

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Decadal Science Strategy Surveys: Report of a Workshop   Noel Hinners Bruce Marcus George Paulikas Panelists comment on issues and potential future approaches in dealing with the following: How does a survey committee determine the level of cost and risk for candidate missions that have not yet been fully defined? How does a committee define an affordable decadal plan? Can a decadal survey be stable for 10 years? What similarities and distinctions are there between planning for NSF ground-based facilities and space missions? General discussion Noon Lunch Workshop Session 3 (Moderator: Jacqueline Hewitt) 1:15 pm Basic assumptions underlying surveys   Panel Daniel Baker Joseph Burns Megan Urry Warren Washington Panelists comment on issues and potential future approaches in dealing with the following: Sacrosanct programs. Should certain programs be taken off the table for discussion in a survey? What kinds and why or why not? Legacy projects. How should surveys deal with priorities from prior surveys? Time horizon(s). Is a decade too short or too long? What are appropriate timescales for consideration? Community buy-in. How much and what kind of community buy-in should be expected? How should it be obtained? How should it be communicated? Stakeholder expectations. Who are the audiences for the surveys, and what do they (or should they) expect of a survey?

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Decadal Science Strategy Surveys: Report of a Workshop   Science vs. applications. Are the considerations for science different from those for applications? Advice to multiple agencies. Are there special considerations for dealing with multiple agencies? The meaning of independence, objectivity, and ownership. How should surveys deal with independence and objectivity in the face of vested interests, advocacy, and horse trading? General discussion THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2006 Workshop Session 4 (Moderator: Ed Stone) 8:30 am Lessons learned and implications for next surveys. Consideration of the following:   Resilience. How can surveys be resilient in the face of likely but unpredictable (scientific, technical, programmatic, or political) developments? Queuing. Should surveys recommend specific mission queues or should queuing be left to agency decision makers? Under what conditions is one approach preferred over another? Balance. How should surveys treat priorities for missions vs. priorities for a mix of mission sizes? Costing. How, and how explicitly, should surveys handle costs? What factors should be considered? Where should cost data come from? Technology readiness and risk. How, and how explicitly, should surveys handle technology readiness and risk? Executability and realism. How can surveys be as realistic as possible about feasibility and executability? How much should recommendations push the programmatic, technological, and budget envelopes? Should there be multiple budget scenarios? Priorities. Should or can surveys produce single integrated priority lists, or are parallel lists more reasonable and useful? Should surveys prioritize only science or both science and missions? Portfolio mix. How, and how explicitly, should surveys handle portfolio balance? Should all elements of a program and their relative sizes be scrutinized by surveys? Timing. How often should surveys be conducted? How long should they take, and can they be accelerated? When do we know the time has come to start a new survey?

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Decadal Science Strategy Surveys: Report of a Workshop   International perspectives. How should international plans, missions, and mission opportunities be treated in surveys? Committees and staffing. What are key considerations for constituting a survey committee and staff? What are provisions for ensuring expertise, independence, community and agency buy-in, and efficiency? Synthesis Panel Spiro Antiochos Charles Bennett Judith Curry Laurie Leshin Government representatives 11:00 am Summary synthesis presentation (Stone) Noon Workshop adjourns