Organizational Impediments to Estimating Populations, and Acquiring, Accessing, and Using Population Data

John A. Kelmelis, U.S Geological Survey and Department of State, Washington, D.C.


Political Geography and Emergency Relief

Wm. Glen Lauber, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, Washington, D.C.


Identify Ways in Which Subnational Demographic and Geographic Data and Tools Could Be Used to Help Decision Makers Provide Useful Information to Populations at Risk

Shannon Doocy, Johns Hopkins University Center for Refugee and Disaster Response, Baltimore, Maryland


Cognitive and Institutional Limits on Collecting and Processing Data on Populations at Risk: Preliminary Reflections on Southern African Responses to Displacement

Loren B. Landau, Wits University’s Forced Migration Studies Programme, Johannesburg, South Africa


Strengths and Limitations of Information and Data Analysis in Responding to Crisis in Mali

Mamadou Kani Konaté, CAREF, Bamako, Mali

ASSESSING THE STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF EXISTING DATA FOR ESTIMATING SUBNATIONAL POPULATIONS AT RISK FROM DISASTERS ASSOCIATED WITH NATURAL HAZARDS

Mark Pelling, King’s College, London

INTRODUCTION

This paper offers a review of international disaster databases. It draws on Pelling (2005a,b, 2006). Four publicly accessible, international databases are described, and challenges facing the use of these data for subnational analysis are assessed.

THE INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTIONAL ARCHITECTURE FOR COLLECTING DATA ON DISASTER LOSS

Table E-1 presents a summary of the characteristics of four disaster loss databases: EM-DAT, NatCat, Sigma, and DesInventar. These are discussed in turn below.



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