7
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CHAPTER 1

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DHHS (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). 2000. Healthy People 2010: Understanding and Improving Health. 2nd ed. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

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Fox MK, Crepinsek MK, Connor P, Battaglia M. 2001. School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study-II (SNDA-II): Summary of Findings. Alexandria, VA: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA.

French SA, Story M, Fulkerson JA, Gerlach AF. 2003. Food environment in secondary schools: À la carte, vending machines, and food policies and practices. Am J Public Health 93(7):1161–1167.

GAO (U.S. Government Accountability Office). 2005. School Meal Programs: Competitive Foods Are Widely Available and Generate Substantial Revenues for Schools. GAO-05-563. Washington, DC: GAO. [Online]. Available: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05563.pdf [accessed October 6, 2005].

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7 References CHAPTER 1 Cullen KW, Zakeri I. 2004. Fruits, vegetables, milk, and sweetened beverages consumption and access to à la carte/snack bar meals at school. Am J Public Health 94(3):463–467. DHHS (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). 2000. Healthy People 00: Un- derstanding and Improing Health. 2nd ed. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. DHHS/USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture). 2004. Report of the Dietary Guidelines Adisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 00. A Report to the Secretary of Health and Human Serices and the Secretary of Agriculture. [Online]. Available: http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/report/ [accessed November 28, 2006]. DHHS/USDA. 2005. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 00. Washington, DC: U.S. Gov- ernment Printing Office. [Online]. Available: http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/ dga2005/document/ [accessed November 17, 2006]. Fox MK, Crepinsek MK, Connor P, Battaglia M. 2001. School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study-II (SNDA-II): Summary of Findings. Alexandria, VA: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA. French SA, Story M, Fulkerson JA, Gerlach AF. 2003. Food environment in secondary schools: À la carte, vending machines, and food policies and practices. Am J Public Health 93(7):1161–1167. GAO (U.S. Government Accountability Office). 2005. School Meal Programs: Competitie Foods Are Widely Aailable and Generate Substantial Reenues for Schools. GAO-05- 563. Washington, DC: GAO. [Online]. Available: http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05563. pdf [accessed October 6, 2005]. Gerald DE, Hussar WJ. 2003. Projections of Educational Statistics to 0. NCES 2004- 013. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Department of Education. 

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