APPENDIX D
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Graham Kalton (Chair) is chairman of the board, senior statistician, and senior vice president of Westat. He is also a research professor in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. Previously he was a research scientist in the Survey Research Center and a professor of biostatistics and statistics at the University of Michigan, professor of social statistics at the University of Southampton, and a reader in social statistics at the London School of Economics. His research interests are in survey sampling and general survey methodology. He is a past member of the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT); chaired its Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, and the Panel to Study the NSF Scientific and Technical Personnel Data System; and has served as a member of two other panels. A past president of the International Association of Survey Statisticians, he has been chair of the American Statistical Association’s section on survey research methods and chair of the Royal Statistical Society’s social statistics section and served on the Council of the Royal Statistical Society. He has a B.Sc. in economics and an M.Sc. in statistics from the University of London and a Ph.D. in survey methodology from the University of Southampton.


Barbara A. Bailar is an independent consultant on survey methodology who retired from the position of senior vice president for survey research at the National Opinion Research Center (NORC). Prior to joining NORC in 1995, Dr. Bailar was the executive director of the American Statistical



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Using the American Community Survey: Benefits and Challenges APPENDIX D Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff Graham Kalton (Chair) is chairman of the board, senior statistician, and senior vice president of Westat. He is also a research professor in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. Previously he was a research scientist in the Survey Research Center and a professor of biostatistics and statistics at the University of Michigan, professor of social statistics at the University of Southampton, and a reader in social statistics at the London School of Economics. His research interests are in survey sampling and general survey methodology. He is a past member of the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT); chaired its Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, and the Panel to Study the NSF Scientific and Technical Personnel Data System; and has served as a member of two other panels. A past president of the International Association of Survey Statisticians, he has been chair of the American Statistical Association’s section on survey research methods and chair of the Royal Statistical Society’s social statistics section and served on the Council of the Royal Statistical Society. He has a B.Sc. in economics and an M.Sc. in statistics from the University of London and a Ph.D. in survey methodology from the University of Southampton. Barbara A. Bailar is an independent consultant on survey methodology who retired from the position of senior vice president for survey research at the National Opinion Research Center (NORC). Prior to joining NORC in 1995, Dr. Bailar was the executive director of the American Statistical

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Using the American Community Survey: Benefits and Challenges Association in Alexandria, Virginia. Most of her career was spent at the U.S. Census Bureau, where she was the Associate Director for Statistical Standards and Methodology. She has published numerous articles in such journals as the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Demography, and Survey Research Methods. She is a past president of the American Statistical Association and the International Association of Survey Statisticians, as well as a past vice president of the International Statistical Institute. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She received a Ph.D. in statistics from American University in Washington, D.C. Paul P. Biemer is distinguished fellow, statistics, at RTI International and associate director for survey research and development for the Odum Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has taught at the University of Maryland (Joint Program in Survey Methodology), the University of Michigan (Summer Institute), and George Washington University (Statistics Department). He was formerly head of the Department of Experimental Statistics and director of the Statistics Center at New Mexico State University; at the Census Bureau, he was assistant director for statistical research. His research has examined the relationships between survey design and survey error, statistical methods for assessing survey errors, particularly measurement errors and methods for the analysis of survey data. He co-developed computer audio recorded interviewing (CARI) and pioneered the field of latent class analysis for survey evaluation. At UNC, he established the Certificate Program in Survey Methodology, which he directs. He is the author of Introduction to Survey Quality and several edited volumes, including Measurement Errors in Surveys. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from Texas A&M University. Constance F. Citro is the director of the Committee on National Statistics, a position she has held since May 2004. She began her career with CNSTAT in 1984 as study director for the panel that produced The Bicentennial Census: New Directions for Methodology in 1990. Previously she held positions as vice president of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and Data Use and Access Laboratories, Inc. She was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation/Census research fellow and is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the International Statistical Institute. For CNSTAT, she directed evaluations of the 2000 census, the Survey of Income and Program Participation, microsimulation models for social welfare programs, and the NSF science and engineering personnel data system, in addition to studies on institutional review boards and social science research, estimates of poverty for small geographic areas, data and methods for retirement income modeling, and alternative poverty measures.

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Using the American Community Survey: Benefits and Challenges She has a B.A. in political science from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University. Michael L. Cohen is a senior program officer for CNSTAT, currently serving as director of the Panel on Census Coverage Measurement and the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments. He also served as co-study director for the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods and staff to the Panel to Review the 2000 Census. He previously assisted the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas and directed the Panel on Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems. Formerly, he was a mathematical statistician at the Energy Information Administration, an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, and a visiting lecturer in statistics at Princeton University. His general area of research is the use of statistics in public policy, with a particular interest in the census undercount, model validation, and robust estimation. A fellow of the American Statistical Association and member of the International Statistical Institute, he has a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Michigan and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Stanford University. Daniel L. Cork is a senior program officer for CNSTAT, currently serving as study director of the Panel to Review the Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics and senior program officer for the Panel on the Feasibility, Accuracy, and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database. He previously served as study director of the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, co-study director of the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods, and program officer for the Panel to Review the 2000 Census. His research interests include quantitative criminology, particularly space-time dynamics in homicide; Bayesian statistics; and statistics in sports. He holds a B.S. in statistics from George Washington University and an M.S. in statistics and a joint Ph.D. in statistics and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. Nancy Dunton is associate research professor at the University of Kansas School of Nursing and associate research professor of health policy and management at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. She joined the University of Kansas faculty in 2001, having previously researched a wide variety of topics as principal social scientist at Midwest Research Institutes. Her research in health and social services has included evaluations of the “KIDS COUNT” program in New York and examination of barriers to self-sufficiency among welfare recipients. She is a member of the Kansas City Metro Outlook Technical Advisory Panel and the Mid American Regional Council, and is actively involved in various professional organi-

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Using the American Community Survey: Benefits and Challenges zations. For CNSTAT, she served on the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas. She has M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Martin R. Frankel is professor of statistics and computer information systems at Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, City University of New York. Since 1996, he has also served as senior statistical scientist at Abt Associates. From 1974 to 1996, he was senior statistical scientist for NORC. He has published extensively on probability sampling and analysis of sample data. He has been involved in the development of sampling procedures for use in primary and secondary education as well as health care research. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and has chaired the association’s section on survey research methods. He is a member of the International Statistical Institute and has served as president of the Market Research Council. From 1975 to 1981, he served as member and, ultimately, chair of the American Statistical Association’s advisory committee to the Census Bureau regarding the 1980 census. He served on the CNSTAT Panel on Occupational Safety and Health Statistics. He has an M.A. in mathematical statistics and a Ph.D. in mathematical sociology from the University of Michigan. D. Tim Holt is professor emeritus of social statistics at the University of Southampton, United Kingdom. In 1995, he left his academic position at Southampton to serve as director of the Office for National Statistics in London, head of the Government Statistical Service, and registrar general for England and Wales. He held the position of director of national statistics for the United Kingdom until 2000, when he returned to the University of Southampton. His research interests include methodology for official statistics as well as inference from clustered and aggregated data, small-area estimation, and ecological regression. He is the recipient of many honors in statistics and was made a Companion of the Bath on the Queen’s New Years Honors List for 2000. He received a B.Sc. degree in mathematics and a Ph.D. in statistics, both from the University of Exeter. Sharon Lohr is Thompson Industries dean’s distinguished professor of statistics at Arizona State University. An active researcher in survey methodology, she is the author of Sampling: Design and Analysis (1999). She has served as a member of the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations and Statistics Canada’s Advisory Committee on Statistical Methods. A fellow of the American Statistical Association, she has served as chair of its section on survey research methods and was the first recipient of the Washington Statistical Society’s Gertrude M. Cox award for “making

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Using the American Community Survey: Benefits and Challenges significant contributions to statistical practice.” She has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Charles L. Purvis is principal transportation planner and analyst at the Metropolitan Transportation Commission in Oakland, California. An active user of census data for transportation planning, he currently chairs the Transportation Research Board’s (TRB) section on travel analysis methods and a panel on statistical and methodological standards for metropolitan travel surveys; he was also a member of the TRB planning committee for a conference on census data for transportation planning held in May 2005. Previously, he chaired the TRB Committee on Urban Transportation Data and Information Systems. He has an M.A. in city and regional planning from Rutgers University. Joseph J. Salvo is director of the Population Division at the New York City Department of City Planning, where he was previously deputy director and senior demographer. His background includes a year at the U.S. Census Bureau in 1981-1982. He has broad experience in immigration, the application of small-area data for policies and programs, and the use of census data. A past president of the Association of Public Data Users, he has experience with the Census Bureau’s Master Address File and TIGER geographic database, as well as the American Community Survey. A member of the CNSTAT Panel on Research on Future Census Methods, he chaired the Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) working group jointly sponsored by that panel and the Panel to Review the 2000 Census. He is an adjunct associate professor in the Urban Affairs and Planning Department at Hunter College of the City University of New York. He is a recipient of the Sloan Public Service Award from the Fund for the City of New York, as well as a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Fordham University. Hal S. Stern is professor and founding chair of statistics at the University of California, Irvine. Prior to joining the Irvine faculty in 2002, he was Laurence H. Baker chair in biological statistics at Iowa State University and also held academic appointment at Harvard University. An expert in Bayesian modeling and techniques, he is coauthor of Bayesian Data Analysis, a leading text in the field. For CNSTAT, he earlier served on the Panel on Operational Test Design and Evaluation of the Interim Armored Vehicle (Stryker). A fellow of the American Statistical Association, he has served as editor of the association’s magazine Chance and chair of the association’s section on Bayesian statistical science and the section on statistics in sports. He has M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Stanford University.

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Using the American Community Survey: Benefits and Challenges Meyer Zitter is an independent demographic consultant. Formerly, he was chief of the Census Bureau’s Population Division and also served as assistant director for international programs. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the International Statistical Institute and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. He has a B.B.A. degree from City College of New York.