BOX 3-2

Selected Uses of Long-Form-Sample Estimates in Federal Fund Allocation Formulas

  1. Special Education Grants to States ($10.6 billion obligated in fiscal 2005): Allocates funds to states for the education of handicapped children in part by a formula that includes long-form-sample estimates of the number of children in the age ranges mandated by the state’s program and the number of children in poverty in those age ranges.

  2. Head Start ($6.7 billion obligated in fiscal 2005): Allocates funds to states according to long-form-sample estimates of the number of children ages 0–4 living in poor families. Organizations that operate Head Start programs use long-form-sample data as part of their applications to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for funding (within the limit of the funds allocated to their state).

  3. Community Development Block Grants, Entitlement Grants and State’s Program ($4.1 billion authorized in fiscal 2005): Allocates 70 percent of funds to large jurisdictions (metropolitan counties with 200,000 or more people and cities with 50,000 or more people) and 30 percent of funds to the remaining areas of states on the basis of the larger amount computed under two formulas. One formula uses long-form-sample estimates of total population, poverty population, and overcrowded housing units; the other formula uses long-form-sample estimates of total population, poverty population, and housing units built before 1940.

  4. Home Investment Partnerships Program ($1.9 billion authorized in fiscal 2005): Allocates funds to states, cities, urban counties, and consortia of local governments by a formula that uses various long-form-sample estimates, such as the estimated number of rental units built before 1950 occupied by poor families.

  5. Workforce Investment Act Adult and Youth Activities Programs ($1.9 billion obligated in fiscal 2005): Allocate funds to states, which reallocate most funds to local areas, by formulas that include long-form-sample estimates of unemployment and economic disadvantage for youths and adults.

  6. Title V Maternal and Child Health Services Block Grant to the States ($586 million obligated in fiscal 2005): Allocates funds to states as the sum of the state share of funds received for eight antecedent programs as of 1981 plus a share of any funds appropriated above the fiscal year 1983 level according to the state’s number of poor children under age 18 estimated from the long-form sample.

  7. The New Freedom Program, enacted August 2005 in the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU, P.L. 109-59): Allocated $78 million in fiscal 2006 for improved transportation services for people with disabilities. Funds are allocated to urbanized areas with 200,000 or more people (60 percent of the funds), and to states for smaller urbanized areas (20 percent) and for nonurbanized areas (20 percent). Within each group, funds are allocated to urbanized areas and states on the basis of the number of people with disabilities.



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