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JEROME J. TIEMANN

1932–2006

Elected in 1984

“For his creativity and leadership in developing advanced electronics for communications, medical diagnostics, radar, and video information processing.”


WRITTEN BY JAMES B. COMLY SUBMITTED BY THE NAE HOME SECRETARY


JEROME J. TIEMANN, retired physicist at General Electric (GE) Global Research for more than 44 years, died of a heart attack at his home in Schenectady, New York, on April 25, 2006. He was 74 years old.

Born on February 21, 1932, in Yonkers, New York, Jerry grew up in Hastings on Hudson, New York. He graduated from the Fieldston School in Riverdale, New York (1949), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (B.Sc., 1953), and earned his Ph.D. in theoretical nuclear physics from Stanford University. While at Stanford, he was invited to work at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of California Lawrence Radiation Laboratory.

Jerry came to the GE Corporate Research Laboratory (now GE Global Research) in 1957, the year the integrated circuit was patented. That was also the year he married Adrian Rooke, his wife of 49 years. Jerry was an inspired scientist and engineer who lived and worked during a golden age of scientific advancement, brought about in part by competition after the launch of Sputnik by the Soviet Union.

His early fundamental studies on interband electron tunneling (1959–1964) led to the first practical method of manufacturing commercial tunneling diode devices. This work was cited by Leo Esaki in his 1973 Nobel Lecture for physics. Jerry then helped design circuits incorporating these devices, including the



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