Appendix B
Biographies of the Committee Members

James F. O’Bryon, Chair, served as deputy assistant secretary of defense until his retirement in 2001. During his 15 years in the Pentagon, he served under seven secretaries of defense, as director, Live Fire Testing, and deputy director, Operational Test and Evaluation. Mr. O’Bryon also worked in various positions within the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering in the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology, overseeing and directing test and evaluation activities for the secretary of defense. These activities included the examination of the test plan adequacy; test execution; and vulnerability, lethality, and survivability of the



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Fusion of Security System Data to Improve Airport Security Appendix B Biographies of the Committee Members James F. O’Bryon, Chair, served as deputy assistant secretary of defense until his retirement in 2001. During his 15 years in the Pentagon, he served under seven secretaries of defense, as director, Live Fire Testing, and deputy director, Operational Test and Evaluation. Mr. O’Bryon also worked in various positions within the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering in the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology, overseeing and directing test and evaluation activities for the secretary of defense. These activities included the examination of the test plan adequacy; test execution; and vulnerability, lethality, and survivability of the

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Fusion of Security System Data to Improve Airport Security nation’s major defense systems and the application of tactics and doctrine to these issues. He has testified before various committees of the U.S. Congress on defense and homeland security issues as well as drafted reports from the secretary of defense on system survivability, vulnerability, and lethality. He has served on more than a dozen committees addressing such issues as directed energy, ozone-depleting compounds, and modeling and simulation. His degrees are from the King’s College, George Washington University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has also served for nearly 20 years as a mathematician, ballistician, and weapon systems analyst at the Ballistics Research Laboratory and the Army’s Materiel Systems Analysis activity. He currently works as an independent defense consultant for several government entities, not-for-profit organizations, and defense industries and serves as president of The O’Bryon Group. Sandra L. Hyland, Vice Chair, is the Etching System group manager, Tokyo Electron (TEL) Technology Center, America, responsible for TEL’s etch process development at the Albany Nanotechnology Center at the State University of New York at Albany. She supports oxide and low-k film etch for integrated development projects for TEL and IBM, as well as for other members of the Nanotechnology Center. Dr. Hyland was formerly East Coast manager for TEL Etch Systems, analyzing technology trends and customer data to determine hardware and process needs for manufacturing current and next-generation computer chips, including both capability and cost-reduction considerations. She had previously been an integration engineer for IBM’s radiation-hardened computer chip manufacturing facility and managed a processing facility for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to assess various materials for their potential as solar-cell substrates. Dr. Hyland was also a staff officer for the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) National Materials Advisory Board, where she managed committees on aviation security and the design of U.S. paper money. She has a Ph.D. in materials science from Cornell University and an M.S. and a B.S. in electrical engineering from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, respectively. Cheryl A. Bitner is vice president of programs for Pioneer Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Inc., a joint venture of AAI Corporation. She has served as program director for electronic warfare trainers, maintenance trainers, gunnery system trainers, and on-board (embedded) trainers at AAI Corporation and as director of AAI quality systems. She has more than 21 years of industry experience in providing training and simulation products for both government and commercial customers, and has a strong background in cost-and schedule-control techniques. Her responsibilities include ensuring positive program performance, strategic planning, and personnel management and development. Ms. Bitner is a certified project management professional, a certified quality manager, a certified software quality engineer, and a member of the National Training and Simulation Association. She has published a cost-and-benefit analysis of piloting and navigational team trainers and contributed to the AAI Training Systems Newsletter. Ms. Bitner completed the advanced program management course at the Defense Systems Management College in 1989 and holds an M.S. in engineering science and a B.S. in computer science from Loyola College. Donald E. Brown is chair of the Department of Systems Engineering of the University of Virginia. His research focuses on data fusion and simulation optimization with applications to intelligence, security, logistics, and transportation. He has developed

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Fusion of Security System Data to Improve Airport Security decision-support systems for several U.S. intelligence agencies and was previously an intelligence operations officer for the U.S. Army. Dr. Brown is coeditor of Operations Research and Artificial Intelligence: The Integration of Problem Solving Strategies and Intelligent Scheduling Systems and is an associate editor for the journal International Abstracts in Operations Research. He has been president, vice president, and secretary of the Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is past chair of the Technical Section on Artificial Intelligence of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science and was awarded that society’s Outstanding Service Award. Colin G. Drury is a professor of industrial engineering at the State University of New York, Buffalo, and executive director of the Center for Industrial Effectiveness, where he has worked extensively in the integration of ergonomics/human factors into company operations. His efforts have resulted in increased competitiveness and job growth for regional industry and two National Association of Management and Technical Assistance Centers’ Project of the Year awards. Since 1990, Dr. Drury has headed a team applying human factors to the inspection and maintenance of civil aircraft, with the goal being error reduction. He performed a study for the Air Transport Association evaluating the Federal Aviation Administration’s modular bomb set and the use of this bomb set in training and testing security screeners. Dr. Drury is a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the Institute of Industrial Engineers, and the Ergonomics Society. In 1981, he was awarded the Bartlett Medal by the Ergonomics Society, and in 1992 the Paul Fitts Award by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. He has a Ph.D. in production engineering from Birmingham University, specializing in work design and ergonomics. Dr. Drury served on the NRC Panel on Assessment of Technologies Deployed to Improve Aviation Security. Patrick Griffin is a senior member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories and was chair of the NRC Panel on Assessment of the Practicality of Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis for Aviation Security. At Sandia National Laboratories, Dr. Griffin performs research in the areas of radiation modeling and simulation, neutron effects testing, radiation dosimetry, and radiation damage to materials. He is active in the standardization community and is the current chair of the American Society of Testing and Materials Subcommittee E10.05 on Nuclear Radiation Metrology. Harry E. Martz, Jr., is the director for the Center for Nondestructive Characterization (CNDC) and leader of the measurement technologies focus area at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Dr. Martz has an extensive background in the use of computed tomography and x-ray radiography (technologies commonly used in explosives detection) to perform nondestructive evaluation. His current projects include the research of nondestructive characterization systems for detecting improvised explosive devices and radiation/nuclear threats as well as nonintrusive characterization techniques as a three-dimensional imaging tool to better understand material properties and perform inspection of components and assemblies, and generation of finite-element models from characterization data. Dr. Martz has served on several NRC committees and panels dealing with the general topic of aviation security. In addition, he chaired the NRC Panel on Technical Regulation of Explosives Detection Systems. Richard McGee is a retired electronics engineer with 35 years at the Ballistic/Army Research Laboratory (ARL), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. He is

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Fusion of Security System Data to Improve Airport Security currently working part time as a senior scientist contractor at ARL. Mr. McGee is an experienced researcher with extensive expertise in millimeter-wave, infrared, radiometry, radar, smart munitions, and sensor-based systems engineering and integration. He possesses solid understanding of the procedures and tasks required to transfer technology from the research laboratory to the field. Mr. McGee has conducted field experiments to characterize near-Earth propagation of millimeter waves (10 mm to 1 mm wavelength) in turbid and tactically hostile environments. He has designed, fabricated, and field-tested smart munitions sensors as well as instrumentation to measure millimeter radiometric and radar signatures of red and blue combat vehicles and various terrains. Other projects in which he has been involved are microwave and millimeter-wave holography and the development of multispectral fusion target recognition algorithms and synthetic aperture radar and inverse synthetic aperture radar high-resolution instrumentation. Richard L. Rowe is retired chief executive officer of MCMS, Inc., a $550 million electronics contract manufacturing company. His experience includes sensor technologies applied to aviation security, and his expertise includes new technologies in optics and radio frequency, electronic sensors, and switch products. He has more than 20 years of experience in the electronic sensors and switch products industry. Prior to his work in the electronics industry, Mr. Rowe was with the U.S. Army for 6 years. He has a master’s degree in engineering administration from The George Washington University, Washington, D.C., and a bachelor’s degree in engineering and applied sciences from the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York. He has served on the boards of various electronics firms and was awarded the Honeywell Lund Award (a major leadership award) in 1987. H. Bruce Wallace is president of MMW Concepts LLC, a firm that he established to provide consultative expertise. He retired as a Department of the Army civilian employee most recently acting as deputy and director of the Weapons and Materials Research Directorate of the Army Research Laboratory. Previous to that, he spent 7 years as chief of the radio frequency (RF) and Electronics Division, where he was responsible for the Army’s basic and applied research in RF technologies. His primary area of research involved investigation of the application of millimeter-wave techniques to weapons systems. This included studies in electronic components, atmospheric and near-Earth propagation, active and passive system designs, and high-resolution polarimetric imaging. Key outcomes from his work were the development of the Sense and Destroy Armor millimeter-wave system; the Army’s High Resolution Radar Imaging facility, which provides state-of-the-art imaging on ground platforms; and the Multifunction Radio Frequency System, which has become a key electronic component in the Army’s Future Combat Systems. He is author of more than 60 government and open-literature publications. Mr. Wallace has served on multiple Department of Defense and North Atlantic Treaty Organization panels as chair or Army lead and as lead investigator on several trade studies of Department of Defense radar systems and capabilities. He was a member of two NASA review panels providing technical and managerial review of basic research programs and a member of the independent review team examining the performance of the Phoenix Mars landing radar. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Geosciences and Remote Sensing Society.