Appendix C
About the Rapporteurs

John Kambhu is a vice president in the Financial Intermediation Function of the Research and Statistics Group of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, where he has worked since 1988. He focuses on issues relating to market liquidity, risk management, financial derivatives, and public disclosure of market and credit risks. Prior to joining the Bank, John was an assistant professor of economics at Columbia University. He received a Ph.D. in economics from New York University in 1981.


Scott Weidman is the director of the National Research Council’s Board on Mathematical Sciences and Their Applications. He joined the NRC in 1989 with the Board on Mathematical Sciences and moved to the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology in 1992. In 1996, Scott established a new board to conduct annual peer reviews of the Army Research Laboratory, which conducts a broad array of science, engineering, and human factors research and analysis, and he later directed a similar board that reviews the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Scott has been with the BMSA full-time since June 2004. During his NRC career, he has staffed studies on a wide variety of topics related to mathematical, chemical, and materials sciences, laboratory assessment, risk analysis, computational science, and science and technology policy. His current focus is on building up the NRC’s capabilities and portfolio related to all areas of mathematical analysis and computational science. Scott holds bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and materials science from Northwest-



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 107
Appendix C About the Rapporteurs John kambhu is a vice president in the Financial Intermediation Func- tion of the Research and Statistics Group of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, where he has worked since 1988. He focuses on issues relating to market liquidity, risk management, financial derivatives, and public disclosure of market and credit risks. Prior to joining the Bank, John was an assistant professor of economics at Columbia University. He received a Ph.D. in economics from New York University in 1981. Scott Weidman is the director of the National Research Council’s Board on Mathematical Sciences and Their Applications. He joined the NRC in 1989 with the Board on Mathematical Sciences and moved to the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology in 1992. In 1996, Scott established a new board to conduct annual peer reviews of the Army Research Labora- tory, which conducts a broad array of science, engineering, and human factors research and analysis, and he later directed a similar board that reviews the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Scott has been with the BMSA full-time since June 2004. During his NRC career, he has staffed studies on a wide variety of topics related to mathematical, chemical, and materials sciences, laboratory assessment, risk analysis, computational science, and science and technology policy. His current focus is on building up the NRC’s capabilities and portfolio related to all areas of mathematical analysis and computational science. Scott holds bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and materials science from Northwest- 0

OCR for page 107
0 NEW DIRECTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING SYSTEMIC RISK ern University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from the University of Virginia. Neel krishnan received a B.A. in economics and anthropology from Columbia University in 2005. He is currently a research associate in the Capital Markets Function of the Research and Statistics Group of the Fed- eral Reserve Bank of New York.