Appendixes



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Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment Appendixes

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Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment This page intentionally left blank.

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Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment A Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBERS LEON J. OSTERWEIL, Chair, is a professor in the Department of Computer Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), has been an ACM lecturer, and has served on the editorial boards of IEEE Software and ACM’s Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology. He was interim dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where he is the codirector and cofounder of both the Electronic Enterprise Institute and the Laboratory for Advanced Software Engineering Research. Dr. Osterweil was chair of the Computer Science Department at the University of Colorado at Boulder and of the Information and Computer Science Department of the University of California, Irvine, where he was also the founding director of the Irvine Research Unit in Software. He has been the program chair of many conferences, including the 16th International Conference on Software Engineering. He was General Chair of both the 28th International Conference on Software Engineering and the Sixth International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering. Dr. Osterweil’s research has centered on the effective application of computing to support software development, electronic commerce, medical safety, and digital government. His research has placed particular emphasis on process programming, tool and environment integration mechanisms, and software testing and analysis tools. He has been a principal investigator on a number of National Science Foundation (NSF) and Advanced Research Projects

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Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment Agency/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA/DARPA) projects over the past 35 years. He has published and presented more than 100 papers on a variety of software engineering topics, mostly in leading venues worldwide. He has consulted for such organizations as IBM, Bell Laboratories, SAIC, MCC, KLA-Tencor, Tata Consultancy Services (India), The Numerical Algorithms Group, Ltd (UK), and TRW. He was a member of the Process Program Advisory Board of Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute for 8 years. He received his A.B. from Princeton University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Maryland, all in mathematics. MATT BISHOP is a professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Davis, and a codirector of the Computer Security Laboratory there. His main research area is the analysis of vulnerabilities in computer systems, including modeling them, building tools to detect vulnerabilities, and ameliorating or eliminating them. He is active in information assurance education and is a charter member of the Colloquium on Information Systems Security Education. He has been active in the area of UNIX security since 1979 and has presented tutorials at SANS, USENIX, and other conferences. His textbook, Computer Security: Art and Science, was published in December 2002 by Addison-Wesley Professional. Dr. Bishop also teaches software engineering, machine architecture, operating systems, programming, and computer security. In 2006, he received the Colloquium Academia Award for his research and pedagogical work in computer information security. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from Purdue University, where he specialized in computer security, in 1984. MICHAEL J. CAREY received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1983. From 1983 to 1995 he was on the Computer Sciences Department faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he taught and conducted research on a variety of database system architecture and performance issues. In 1995, Dr. Carey moved to IBM Research, where he worked on data integration, DB2 Universal Database, and Extensible Markup Language (XML) query technologies and managed a small team of object/relational and XML database researchers. Dr. Carey left IBM in 2000 to lead an e-commerce infrastructure team as a fellow at Propel, a small, Internet-era startup company. He joined BEA Systems, Inc., in late 2001, and since that time he has been working on the XML data-handling and XQuery-related aspects of BEA’s WebLogic Integration, Liquid Data for WebLogic, and AquaLogic Data Services Platform products. He is currently a senior engineering director and product architect within BEA’s AquaLogic product organization. Dr. Carey

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Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment has authored well over 100 technical articles in refereed conference proceedings and journals. He has served on the editorial boards of ACM’s Transactions on Database Systems, VLDB Journal, and IEEE Database Engineering Bulletin, and he has served on numerous conference committees. He is co-editor-in-chief of Springer-Verlag’s book series on Data-Centric Systems and Applications and is currently serving on the ACM SIGMOD (Special Interest Group on Management of Data) Awards Committee and the University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison Computer Sciences Department Board of Visitors. Dr. Carey has received a number of awards, including an IBM Faculty Development Award, a Digital Equipment Corporation Incentives for Excellence Award, a UW-Madison Computer Sciences Department Teaching Award, an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, an IBM Outstanding Technical Achievement Award, a VLDB (Very Large Databases) 10-Year Best Paper Award, an ACM SIGMOD Test of Time Paper Award, a University of California, Berkeley, Computer Science Outstanding Alumnus Award, and the ACM SIGMOD Contributions and Edgar F. Codd Innovations Awards. Dr. Carey is a fellow of the ACM and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. DAVID J. DeWITT joined the Computer Sciences Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in September 1976 after receiving his Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan. He served as department chair for 5 years (July 1999 to July 2004) and is currently the John P. Morgridge Professor of Computer Sciences. In 1995, Professor DeWitt was selected to be an ACM Fellow. He also received the 1995 SIGMOD Innovations Award for his contributions to the database systems field. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1998. His research program has focused on the design and implementation of database management systems including parallel, object-oriented, and object-relational database systems. In the late 1980s, his Gamma parallel database system project produced many of the key pieces of technology that form the basis for today’s generation of large parallel database systems, including products from IBM, NCR/Teradata, Netezza, Tandem, and Oracle. Throughout his career, he has also been interested in database system performance evaluation. In the early 1980s, he developed the first relational database system benchmark, which became known as the Wisconsin benchmark. More recently, his research program has focused on the design and implementation of distributed database techniques for executing complex queries against the content of the Internet. Professor DeWitt has authored more than 120 technical publications and served on numerous program committees and NSF review panels. He was a member of the NSF’s Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) Advisory Committee (2000-2003) and has served on several National Research Council (NRC)

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Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) study panels. He is currently a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB). He was the program chair of the 1983 SIGMOD conference, program co-chair of the 1988 VLDB conference, and general chair of the 2002 SIGMOD conference. He has graduated 32 Ph.D. students. Professor DeWitt has served as a consultant to numerous companies, including IBM, NCR, Informix, Tandem, and Microsoft, on a variety of technical issues regarding the design and implementation of database systems. VALERIE GREGG is assistant director for development at the Digital Government Research Center of the Information Sciences Institute at the University of Southern California. She is secretary of the North American chapter of the Digital Government Society. She is co-principal investigator on a National Science Foundation-funded 4-year award entitled “Building and Sustaining an International Digital Government Research Community of Practice.” Prior to working in academia, Ms. Gregg had a 30-year career in public service at the federal level. For 8 years, she was program manager for the Digital Government Research program in the Division of Information and Intelligent Systems at NSF. She has been on the conference committee for the annual International Conference for Digital Government Research since its inception in 2000. Prior to her service at NSF, Ms. Gregg worked for 22 years at the U.S. Census Bureau as a program manager in various aspects of the decennial census. She was a member of the Joint Ventures Project with the Census Bureau, and her work included involvement with the Tiger Mapping Service, a coast-to-coast digital map base that was designed and implemented to demonstrate cost-efficient delivery of public data and research and development of Census Bureau applications on the Internet. She also served as chair for the Interagency Task Force responsible for the design, development, and management of the award-winning Internet site www.fedstats.gov for “one-stop shopping” for federal statistics. BLAISE HELTAI is a partner at NewVantage Partners focusing on the applications of technology to business transformation, emerging technologies, multichannel strategy, and Internet delivery. Dr. Heltai was previously an executive at the FleetBoston Financial Group, where, as the managing director for e-business, he led the company through a fundamental transformation of e-enablement, integration, and rationalization of Internet initiatives for all lines of business—consumer, commercial, and government—in the United States and internationally. He had also led customer relationship management (CRM) initiatives for FleetBoston, as well as managing customer data analysis, direct marketing, market

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Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment research and research and development (R&D) functions for Fleet and Bank of America. He was chief executive officer of fileTRUST, which produced a secure online document-storage and -sharing service. He has held positions at Bell Laboratories and at AT&T Consumer Products, where he led efforts ranging from assessing the demand for new telecommunications services to inventing, developing, and managing interactive television and online services. Dr. Heltai has been published and widely quoted by the national print and broadcast media as a recognized expert in areas such as e-business, online banking and investing, public policy issues, payment technologies, video on demand, and emerging technologies. He has won numerous awards, including Internet Week’s Top 100 of 2001, MassEcomm Top 10 Executives, Microsoft Innovation Award, and Best in Show at the Consumer Electronics Show. He has served on the board of directors of MECA Software, Integrion, LLC, and numerous nonprofit organizations. He has been on the advisory boards of S1 Corporation, PostX, and FTVentures, and currently serves as the president of the Massachusetts Innovation and Technology Exchange. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1984. STEPHEN H. HOLDEN is a principal with Touchstone Consulting Group. While participating on the present NRC committee, he was an assistant professor in the information systems department at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). Dr. Holden’s research included the management of information technology in the public sector, information policy, electronic authentication policies and practices, and electronic government. He has published in Administration and Society, IEEE Internet Computing, Government Information Quarterly, The Information Society, International Journal of Public Administration, and Public Performance and Management Review. He has also contributed book chapters on information policy, electronic government, and information technology in the public sector. Dr. Holden was on the CSTB committee that produced the report Who Goes There?: Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy. He also serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory and the International Journal of E-Government Research. The MITRE Corporation, the IBM Center for the Business of Government, and the Real User Corporation have funded his research. Prior to his academic career, Dr. Holden worked for 16 years in the federal government. That experience included joining the civil service as a presidential management intern at the Naval Sea Systems Command. He spent 10 years at the Office of Management and Budget doing a variety of policy and management work. In his last federal position, he worked at the Internal Revenue Service as a member of the senior executive service in the Electronic Tax

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Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment Administration organization. He earned his Ph.D. in public administration and public affairs from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He also holds a master of public administration and a bachelor of arts in public management from the University of Maine. LARRY G. MASSANARI was acting commissioner of Social Security and most recently served as the regional commissioner for the Social Security Administration’s (SSA’s) Philadelphia region, where he directed agency operations in the mid-Atlantic states. Mr. Massanari began his career with Social Security in 1966 as a claims representative in one of SSA’s field offices. He served in a variety of administrative and managerial positions in the Chicago area before moving to the agency’s headquarters in 1979. He held several top-level positions in SSA’s central office, including director of human resources and associate commissioner for policy. He was named regional commissioner for the Philadelphia Region in 1987. Mr. Massanari has received numerous awards for outstanding achievement. He was a Presidential Executive–rank award winner in 1992 and 1997, receiving the rank of both Meritorious and Distinguished Executive. He was also named a finalist by the Professional Development League in 1997 for distinguished executive service. He has been the recipient of three Commissioner’s Citations, the highest honor conferred on Social Security Administration employees. In 1990, he received the first Commissioner’s Leadership Award, which recognizes the accomplishments of SSA executives. A graduate of Western Michigan University, Mr. Massanari also completed graduate work at Northwestern University. JUDITH S. OLSON is the Richard W. Pew Chair in Human Computer Interaction at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is also a professor in the School of Information, the Business School, and the Department of Psychology. Her research interests include computer-supported cooperative work, human-computer interaction, the design of business information systems for organizational effectiveness, and cognitive psychology. Dr. Olson’s recent research focuses on the nature of group work and the design and evaluation of technology to support it. This field combines cognitive and social psychology with the design of information systems. Dr. Olson began her career at the University of Michigan in the Department of Psychology, served as a technical supervisor for human factors in systems engineering at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, and returned to Michigan to the Business School and the then-new School of Information. She has more than 60 publications in journals and books, and served on the NRC committee that produced the report Who Goes There?: Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy. She has recently been appointed to the CHI Academy of ACM’s Special Interest Group on Computer-Human

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Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment Interaction. Dr. Olson earned a B.A. in mathematics and psychology from Northwestern University in 1965 and a Ph.D. in 1969 in the same disciplines from the University of Michigan. STAFF LYNETTE I. MILLETT is a senior program officer and study director at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) of the National Research Council. She is currently involved in several CSTB projects, including a study on sustaining growth in computing performance, an exploration of software-intensive systems producibility, and an activity on biometrics systems, among other things. She was the study director for the CSTB projects that produced Software for Dependable Systems: Sufficient Evidence?, Who Goes There?: Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy, and IDs—Not That Easy: Questions About Nationwide Identity Systems. Her portfolio includes significant portions of CSTB’s recent work on software and on identity systems and privacy. She has an M.Sc. in computer science from Cornell University and a B.A. in mathematics and computer science with honors from Colby College. Her graduate work was supported by both a National Science Foundation graduate fellowship and an Intel graduate fellowship. JOAN D. WINSTON is a program officer at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) of the National Research Council. Before joining the staff of CSTB, she was an assistant director (Information Technology Team) at the U.S. Government Accountability Office. From 1998 to 2001, Ms. Winston was principal associate at Steve Walker and Associates, LLC, which managed early-stage venture funds focusing on information technology. From 1995 to 1998, she was director of policy analysis for Trusted Information Systems, Inc. From 1986 to 1995, she held various analytical and project direction positions at the congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) and was named an OTA senior associate in 1993. Before her service with OTA, she worked briefly for the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress. Ms. Winston started her career as an engineer at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc., in Cambridge, Mass. She received an S.B. in physics and an S.M. in technology and policy, both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. JANICE M. SABUDA is a senior program assistant at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. She has supported board activities and is involved in several studies, including Improving Cybersecurity Research in the United States and Privacy

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Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment in the Information Age. Previously, she focused on the congressionally requested study that resulted in Youth, Pornography, and the Internet and the project that resulted in Global Networks and Local Values: A Comparative Look at Germany and the United States. Prior to joining CSTB in August 2001, she worked as a customer service representative at an online fundraising company and as a client services analyst at a prospect research firm. She is currently pursuing a certificate in event management from the George Washington University Center for Professional Development. She received her bachelor of science degree (1999) in business administration from the State University of New York College at Fredonia.