Appendixes



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Distributed Remote Sensing for Naval Undersea Warfare Appendixes

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Distributed Remote Sensing for Naval Undersea Warfare This page intentionally left blank.

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Distributed Remote Sensing for Naval Undersea Warfare A Committee and Staff Biographies Arthur B. Baggeroer, Co-chair, is Ford Professor of Engineering and the Secretary of the Navy/Chief of Naval Operations Chair for Ocean Science in the Departments of Ocean and Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His areas of expertise include advanced signal-processing methods applied to sonar, ocean acoustics, and geophysics. Dr. Baggeroer has served as director of the MIT-Woods Hole joint program in oceanography and oceanographic engineering. During sabbatical leaves he has also served as a consultant to the Chief of Naval Research at the NATO Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic Center in La Spezia, Italy, and as a Green Scholar at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Acoustical Society of America. Dr. Baggeroer is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a former member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Naval Studies Board. Brig “Chip” Elliott, Co-chair, is principal engineer at BBN Technologies, where he has led the design and successful implementation of a number of secure, mission-critical networks based on novel Internet technology for the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. His areas of expertise include wireless Internet technology, mobile ad hoc networks, quality-of-service issues, and novel routing techniques. Mr. Elliott has served as a senior advisor on a number of national and commercial networks, including those for the Discoverer II, Space-Based Infrared System Low, and Celestri/Teledesic satellite constellations and Boeing’s Connexion system. He has also served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, such as the Army Science Board and the Defense Science Board as well as several NRC committees. Mr. Elliott is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board.

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Distributed Remote Sensing for Naval Undersea Warfare James G. Bellingham is chief technologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. His personal research interests revolve around the development and use of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Dr. Bellingham has spent considerable time at sea, leading more than 20 AUV expeditions in locations such as the Antarctic, North Atlantic, Mediterranean, South Pacific, and the Arctic. At present he is working on the development of distributed ocean observing systems, notably the Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network project. Dr. Bellingham is a founder of Bluefin Robotics Corporation, a leading manufacturer of AUVs for the military, commercial, and scientific markets. E. Ann Berman is president of Tri-Space, Incorporated, a remote sensing and software-engineering company serving a broad range of environmental and security areas. Her areas of expertise include remote sensing, measurement intelligence, thermal and spectral analysis, and military space systems. She is currently working with the National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC) on overhead non-imaging infrared processes for estimating diver visibility, light penetration, and other environmental information. Formerly, Dr. Berman served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for C3I and Space, where she managed the Navy blue-green laser communications initiative. She has designed marketing strategies at Communications Satellite Corporation for store-and-forward distributed sensor arrays and a stereographic satellite payload for global terrain mapping. Dr. Berman has also served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including the NRC’s Committee on Environmental Information for Naval Use and the Committee on the Navy’s Needs in Space for Providing Future Capabilities. D. Richard Blidberg is director of the Autonomous Undersea Systems Institute. His areas of expertise include the development of technologies related to autonomous submersible vehicles and architectures for the intelligent guidance and control of multiple autonomous vehicles. Mr. Blidberg has served as manager of the seabed survey operations at Ocean Research Equipment, Inc.; served with the U.S. Coast Guard; and worked at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He has also served on numerous scientific and technical advisory groups. He is currently associate editor of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Journal of Ocean Engineering. Daniel R. Bowler retired from the U.S. Navy with the rank of rear admiral after serving more than 32 years as a surface warfare officer. He is vice president, Maritime Sensors and Electronics Systems, in the Washington Operations Office of Lockheed Martin Corporation, responsible for sensors and electronics for a wide variety of programs across the Services and the Department of Defense. Before joining Lockheed, Admiral Bowler served as director, Warfare Integration and Assessment, Office of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Warfare, Requirements, and Programs. His background includes naval and joint undersea warfare missions, concepts of operations, and capabilities, including distributed remote sensing requirements.

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Distributed Remote Sensing for Naval Undersea Warfare David L. Bradley is a senior research scientist at the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University. His areas of expertise include environmental acoustics, in particular, conducting research in acoustic radiation, propagation, scattering, reflection, absorption, and natural/manmade noise analysis, including spatial and temporal fluctuations. Dr. Bradley is a former member of the NRC’s Ocean Studies Board, chaired the Steering Committee for the Sixth Symposium on Tactical Oceanography, and was a member of the Committee on Potential Impacts of Ambient Noise in the Ocean on Marine Mammals. Albert H. Konetzni, Jr., retired from the U.S. Navy with the rank of vice admiral after 38 years of service, including the position of Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, and Deputy Commander and Chief of Staff, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. His background is in Department of the Navy and Department of Defense planning, programming, and budgeting activities, as well as naval operations involving joint and coalition forces capabilities. William A. LaPlante is head of the Strategic Systems Department at the Applied Physics Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins University. His areas of expertise include technologies associated with antisubmarine warfare, including passive and active acoustics in the nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine security program. Dr. LaPlante served on the Chief of Naval Operations’ Task Force Antisubmarine Warfare. Terry P. Lewis is a senior systems engineer with the Raytheon Company. His areas of expertise include command, control, communications, and information systems; digitized battlespace systems; communications and transmission security in military tactical systems; wireless network security; and network management authentication techniques for robust security architecture. Mr. Lewis has developed antitampering technologies to prevent or reduce the ability of potential aggressors to reverse-engineer critical U.S. communications technologies. He is a Raytheon fellow and received the Most Promising Engineer of the Year award conferred at the 2002 Black Engineer of the Year Award Conference. Thomas V. McNamara is director of the Tactical Systems Programs Office at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, where his primary focus is the development of manned and unmanned systems and weapons systems. These two areas include the development of technologies and systems to address the challenges of littoral, command-and-control, precision engagement, and missile defense systems. Mr. McNamara’s areas of expertise include guidance, navigation, and control; intelligent autonomy; precision weapons delivery; microelectromechanical sensors; dismounted-soldier systems; mission planning; and systems integration for naval submersible and aircraft platforms. He is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. L. David Montague, an independent consultant, is retired president of the Missile Systems Division at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space and a former officer of Lockheed Corporation. His areas of expertise include the design, development, and program management of military weapons and their related systems,

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Distributed Remote Sensing for Naval Undersea Warfare as well as complex systems, engineering and systems integration of ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, and unmanned aerial vehicles. Mr. Montague has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including the Navy Strategic Systems Steering Task Group and task forces for both the U.S. Army and the Defense Science Board. He currently serves as a member of the director’s senior advisory board of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and a previous recipient of the AIAA’s Missile Systems Award. Mr. Montague is also a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Douglas R. Mook is president of the Aptec Group. His areas of expertise include acoustic processing and sensor fusion, advanced acoustics communications, digital battlefield programs for communications and sensors, and unattended ground sensors. He has served as chief operating officer and vice president of engineering at TechOnLine and managed the Antisubmarine Warfare Division, advanced systems, advanced technology, and signal-processing organizations within Lockheed Martin. He has also served as a member of the NRC’s Committee on Network-Centric Naval Forces, as well as a member of the Navy’s Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Review Panel and the Army’s Digital Battlefield Definition Panel. John E. Rhodes retired from the U.S. Marine Corps with the rank of lieutenant general, having served as commanding general of the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Development Command (MCCDC). While at MCCDC, General Rhodes led the Marine Corps in its development of warfighting concepts and in the integration of all aspects of doctrine, organization, training and education, equipment, and support and facilities enabling the Marine Corps to field combat-ready forces. This responsibility entailed, among other things, careful assessments of current and future operating environments and the continuous adaptation of the Corps’s training infrastructure and resources in order to ensure that the integrated capabilities were continuously developed for the Unified Commanders in Chief. James Ward is leader of the Advanced Sensor Techniques Group at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, where he has worked since 1990. His areas of technical expertise include signal processing for radar, sonar, and communications systems; adaptive array and space-time adaptive processing; detection and estimation theory; and systems analysis. Dr. Ward received his B.E.E. from the University of Dayton (Ohio) in 1985 and his M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1987 and 1990, respectively. In 2001 he was the recipient of the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Technical Excellence Award, and in 2003 he received the IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society’s Fred Nathanson Young Engineer Award for contributions to adaptive radar and sonar signal processing. Dr. Ward is a fellow of the IEEE. Dana R. Yoerger is an associate scientist of the Deep Submergence Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics and Engineering, at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. His areas of expertise include underwater vehicles

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Distributed Remote Sensing for Naval Undersea Warfare and manipulators, telerobotic systems designed for seafloor survey, autonomous vehicles used for the long-term monitoring of the deep ocean, vehicle and tether dynamics, and the application of modern nonlinear and adaptive control techniques to underwater vehicle operation. Dr. Yoerger served on the NRC’s Committee on Undersea Vehicles and National Needs. Staff Charles F. Draper is director of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Before joining the NRC in 1997, Dr. Draper was the lead mechanical engineer at S.T. Research Corporation, where he provided technical and program management support for satellite Earth station and small satellite design. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Vanderbilt University in 1995; his doctoral research was conducted at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), where he used an atomic-force microscope to measure the nanomechanical properties of thin-film materials. In parallel with his graduate student duties, he was a mechanical engineer with Geo-Centers, Incorporated, working on-site at NRL on the development of an underwater X-ray backscattering tomography system for nondestructive evaluation of U.S. Navy sonar domes on surface ships. Arul Mozhi is senior program officer at the NRC’s Naval Studies Board; he also served as senior program officer at the NRC’s Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design and National Materials Advisory Board. Prior to joining the NRC in 1999, Dr. Mozhi was senior scientist and program manager at UTRON, Inc., a high-tech company in the Washington, D.C., area, working on pulsed electrical and chemical energy technologies applied to materials processing. From 1989 to 1996, Dr. Mozhi was a senior engineer and task leader at Roy F. Weston, Inc., a leading environmental consulting company working on long-term nuclear materials behavior and systems engineering related to nuclear waste transport, storage, and disposal in support of the U.S. Department of Energy. Before 1989 he was a materials scientist at Marko Materials, Inc., a high-tech firm in the Boston area, working on rapidly solidified materials. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees (the latter in 1986) in materials engineering from Ohio State University and then served as a postdoctoral research associate there. He received his B.S. in metallurgical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in 1982.