Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Robert M. Bell (Chair) is a member of the Statistics Research Department at AT&T Labs-Research in Florham Park, New Jersey. He is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Committee on National Statistics and previously served on multiple NRC panels advising the Census Bureau, including the Panel to Review the 2000 Census, and on the American Statistical Association’s Census Advisory Committee. He is currently a member of the board of trustees of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences and chair of the American Statistical Association’s Committee on Fellows. Earlier, he worked at the RAND Corporation, where he directed a number of studies on social policy issues. His research interests include analysis of data from complex samples, record linkage methods, and machine learning methods. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has a B.S. in mathematics from Harvey Mudd College, an M.S. in statistics from the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University.


Barbara A. Bailar is recently retired from the position of senior vice president for survey research at the National Opinion Research Center (NORC). She now serves as a consultant on survey methodology. Prior to joining NORC in 1995, Dr. Bailar was the executive director of the American Statistical Association in Alexandria, Virginia. However, most of her career was spent at the U.S. Bureau of the Census in Washington, D.C., which she left in 1988, where she was the associate director for Statistical Standards and Methodology. She has published numerous articles in such journals as the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Demography, and Survey Research Methods. She is a past president of the American Statistical Association and the International Association of Survey Statisticians, as well as a past vice president of the International Statistical Association. She is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She received a Ph.D. in statistics from American University in Washington, D.C.


Lawrence D. Brown is the Miers Busch professor in the Department of Statistics at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He has served on the NRC’s Committee on National Statistics and its Panel to Review the 2000 Census, as well as the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and its Board on Mathematical Sciences. He chaired the NRC Committee on the Measurement of Research and Development by the National Science Foundation. He is currently on the U.S. National Committee on Mathematics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and recipient of its Wilks Memorial Award and is a fellow and past president of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. He



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Research and Plans for Coverage Measurement in the 2010 Census: Interim Assessment: Panel on Coverage Evaluation and Correlation Bias in the 2010 Census Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff Robert M. Bell (Chair) is a member of the Statistics Research Department at AT&T Labs-Research in Florham Park, New Jersey. He is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Committee on National Statistics and previously served on multiple NRC panels advising the Census Bureau, including the Panel to Review the 2000 Census, and on the American Statistical Association’s Census Advisory Committee. He is currently a member of the board of trustees of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences and chair of the American Statistical Association’s Committee on Fellows. Earlier, he worked at the RAND Corporation, where he directed a number of studies on social policy issues. His research interests include analysis of data from complex samples, record linkage methods, and machine learning methods. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has a B.S. in mathematics from Harvey Mudd College, an M.S. in statistics from the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. Barbara A. Bailar is recently retired from the position of senior vice president for survey research at the National Opinion Research Center (NORC). She now serves as a consultant on survey methodology. Prior to joining NORC in 1995, Dr. Bailar was the executive director of the American Statistical Association in Alexandria, Virginia. However, most of her career was spent at the U.S. Bureau of the Census in Washington, D.C., which she left in 1988, where she was the associate director for Statistical Standards and Methodology. She has published numerous articles in such journals as the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Demography, and Survey Research Methods. She is a past president of the American Statistical Association and the International Association of Survey Statisticians, as well as a past vice president of the International Statistical Association. She is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She received a Ph.D. in statistics from American University in Washington, D.C. Lawrence D. Brown is the Miers Busch professor in the Department of Statistics at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He has served on the NRC’s Committee on National Statistics and its Panel to Review the 2000 Census, as well as the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and its Board on Mathematical Sciences. He chaired the NRC Committee on the Measurement of Research and Development by the National Science Foundation. He is currently on the U.S. National Committee on Mathematics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and recipient of its Wilks Memorial Award and is a fellow and past president of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. He

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Research and Plans for Coverage Measurement in the 2010 Census: Interim Assessment: Panel on Coverage Evaluation and Correlation Bias in the 2010 Census has a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from Cornell University. Michael L. Cohen (Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics, currently serving as study director for the Panel on the Functionality and Usability of Data from the American Community Survey. Formerly, he was a mathematical statistician at the Energy Information Administration, an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, and a visiting lecturer in statistics at Princeton University. His general area of research is the use of statistics in public policy, with particular interest in census undercount, model validation, and robust estimation. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Michigan and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Stanford University. Roderick Little is the Richard Remington collegiate professor of biostatistics at the University of Michigan, where he also holds appointments in the Department of Statistics and the Institute for Social Research. Previously he was associate professor and professor in the Department of Biomathematics in the School of Medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles, an American Statistical Association/Census/National Science Foundation research fellow at the Census Bureau, and a scientific associate at the World Fertility Survey. A national associate of the National Academy of Sciences, he has served on a variety of NRC panels, including the Committee on Research on Child Abuse and Neglect, the Committee on Evaluation of National and State Assessments of Educational Progress, the Committee on National Statistics, the Committee on Research on Child Abuse and Neglect, and the Panel to Review the 2000 Census. He has served as coordinating and applications editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association, is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, and received its Wilks Memorial Award. His research interests include statistical methods for missing data and survey research methodology. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Cambridge University and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from the Imperial College of Science and Technology, London University. Xiao-Li Meng is chair of the Department of Statistics at Harvard University. Previously, he was assistant and associate and professor in the same department. He has also served as professor of statistics at the University of Chicago and faculty research associate at the National Opinion Research Center. His expertise focuses on Bayesian methods and methods for missing data. He has served as editor of Bayesian Analysis and as an associate editor of Biometrika, the Journal of the American Statistical Association, Statistica Sinica, and the Annals of Statistics. He received the 2001 Committee of Presidents of Statistical Associations Award for outstanding statistician under the age of 40. He is a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and of the American Statistical Association. He has a B.S. in mathematics from Fudan University, Shanghai, and M.A. (1987) and Ph.D. (1990) degrees in statistics from Harvard University. Jeffrey Passel is a senior research associate at the Pew Hispanic Center. His expertise focuses on immigration to the United States and the demography of racial and ethnic

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Research and Plans for Coverage Measurement in the 2010 Census: Interim Assessment: Panel on Coverage Evaluation and Correlation Bias in the 2010 Census groups. Formerly he served as principal research associate at the Urban Institute’s Labor, Human Services and Population Center. Prior to that, he was a demographer at the U.S. Census Bureau, serving last as assistant division chief for population estimates. He was a member of the NRC’s Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Statistical Association. He received the Demographic Diamond as one of the five demographers/social scientists selected by American Demographics as the most representative of influential work in the last 25 years, and he received the Bronze Medal from the U.S. Department of Commerce. Passel has authored numerous studies on immigrant populations in America, focusing on such topics as undocumented immigration, the economic and fiscal impact of the foreign born, and the impact of welfare reform on immigrant populations. He has a B.S. in mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1969), an M.A. in sociology from the University of Texas (1972), and a Ph.D. in social relations from Johns Hopkins University (1976). Donald Ylvisaker is emeritus professor of statistics at the University of California, Los Angeles, having previously been on the faculties of Columbia University, New York University, and the University of Washington. His primary research interest is in the design of experiments; his applied interests have developed as a consulting statistician, frequently on legal matters. Relevant to census methods, he held a joint statistical agreement with the Census Bureau from 1990 to 1991 in which he reviewed the Census Bureau’s 1986 Test of Adjustment Related Operations in Los Angeles. He also served on the Advisory Panel to the Committee on Adjustment of Postcensal Estimates in 1992, and he was an associate editor of a special issue of the Journal of the American Statistical Association on census methods. He was a member of the NRC’s Panel on Research on Future Census Methods. A fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, he has a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. Alan Zaslavsky is professor in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. He has written extensively on issues concerning the decennial census, including weighting and administrative records. A fellow of the American Statistical Association, he has served on three NRC Committee on National Statistics panels involving decennial census methodology: the Panel to Evaluate Alternative Census Methodologies, the Panel on Alternative Census Methodologies, and the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods. He also served on the NRC’s Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas, as well as the Census Advisory Committee on Adjustment of Postcensal Estimates. He has an M.S. in mathematics from Northeastern University and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.