Appendix C
Speaker and Panelist Biographies

Ralph Adler is a research metallurgist on the coatings and corrosion team in the Materials Applications Branch of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL). He works in the Weapons and Materials Research Directorate of ARL at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and has been a federal employee working for the Army since 1985, when he joined the Army Materials Technology Laboratory. Dr. Adler is a research scientist and is not involved in the formulation or implementation of Department of Defense policy. His research interests include science education and awareness for all levels of our society. He has taught graduate-level courses in x-ray diffraction at Northeastern University. To encourage technical collaboration between ARL and universities, Dr. Adler has worked with university faculty in an advisory capacity to provide project oversight and to share resources and materials as well as collaboratively by co-authoring joint publications. He has served as a science fair judge at both local and national levels and organized the initial student poster session at the 2005 Tri-Service Corrosion Conference. To improve the science awareness of public school students and the quality of science education in his hometown, he was a member of the Committee on Science Education of the Citizens for Wellesley Public Education; its charter was to enhance and enrich science education of public school students through strong support of Wellesley public schools’ science faculty and by obtaining donations of scientific equipment. Dr. Adler has represented the Army on several high-level DoD panels, currently serving as an ARL member of the Corrosion Forum, where he is chair of the Corrosion Education Consortium; was chair of Subpanel 8 (materials processing/manufacturing research) for the Project RELIANCE technical panel for advanced materials; was a member of OSD’s Laboratory Infrastructures Consolidation Study, the JDL-TPAM Manufacturing Sciences Working Group and two sessions of the Technical Managers Acquisition Workshop; and was secretary for the metals panel, TP-1, of the Materials Technology and Performance of the MAT group of TTCP. He is/or has been a member of many professional committees: as service liaison on two NRC panels, as a member of ASM’s Advisory Technical Awareness Council; on thesis review panels for Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and Northwestern University; and as chair and Executive Committee member of the Boston section of the Metallurgical Society/AIME. He has also participated in many Army/DoD/NSF source selection panels and has been an invited member of the ARL/ARO and IRAD technical review boards. Dr. Adler earned a D.Eng. degree in metallurgy from Yale University and has over 40 years of experience in leading and conducting sponsored or in-house research for a variety of materials science and engineering programs in both industrial and Army organizations. With his expertise in synthesis/metals processing and materials characterization, he has authored publications and holds U.S. patents in a variety of technical areas with commercial and military applications.


Aziz I. Asphahani is a retired executive of Carus Chemical Company, Peru, Illinois. He completed mathématiques spéciales at the Lycée Janson Sailly in Paris in 1967 and received a diplôme ingénieur-physique from the Ecole Centrale de Paris in 1970. He earned his Ph.D. in materials science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1975. Dr. Asphahani joined Carus Chemical Company in 1995 as president and CEO after spending more than 19 years in the specialty metal industry with Haynes International, Inc. (formerly a division of Cabot Corporation) and Cabval, its joint venture with Vallourec Industries. He served as president of Cabval and as vice president of Haynes, general manager of corrosion alloys, director of R&D, group leader, and corrosion engineer (1975-1994). Dr. Asphahani served on the



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 27
Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century Appendix C Speaker and Panelist Biographies Ralph Adler is a research metallurgist on the coatings and corrosion team in the Materials Applications Branch of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL). He works in the Weapons and Materials Research Directorate of ARL at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, and has been a federal employee working for the Army since 1985, when he joined the Army Materials Technology Laboratory. Dr. Adler is a research scientist and is not involved in the formulation or implementation of Department of Defense policy. His research interests include science education and awareness for all levels of our society. He has taught graduate-level courses in x-ray diffraction at Northeastern University. To encourage technical collaboration between ARL and universities, Dr. Adler has worked with university faculty in an advisory capacity to provide project oversight and to share resources and materials as well as collaboratively by co-authoring joint publications. He has served as a science fair judge at both local and national levels and organized the initial student poster session at the 2005 Tri-Service Corrosion Conference. To improve the science awareness of public school students and the quality of science education in his hometown, he was a member of the Committee on Science Education of the Citizens for Wellesley Public Education; its charter was to enhance and enrich science education of public school students through strong support of Wellesley public schools’ science faculty and by obtaining donations of scientific equipment. Dr. Adler has represented the Army on several high-level DoD panels, currently serving as an ARL member of the Corrosion Forum, where he is chair of the Corrosion Education Consortium; was chair of Subpanel 8 (materials processing/manufacturing research) for the Project RELIANCE technical panel for advanced materials; was a member of OSD’s Laboratory Infrastructures Consolidation Study, the JDL-TPAM Manufacturing Sciences Working Group and two sessions of the Technical Managers Acquisition Workshop; and was secretary for the metals panel, TP-1, of the Materials Technology and Performance of the MAT group of TTCP. He is/or has been a member of many professional committees: as service liaison on two NRC panels, as a member of ASM’s Advisory Technical Awareness Council; on thesis review panels for Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and Northwestern University; and as chair and Executive Committee member of the Boston section of the Metallurgical Society/AIME. He has also participated in many Army/DoD/NSF source selection panels and has been an invited member of the ARL/ARO and IRAD technical review boards. Dr. Adler earned a D.Eng. degree in metallurgy from Yale University and has over 40 years of experience in leading and conducting sponsored or in-house research for a variety of materials science and engineering programs in both industrial and Army organizations. With his expertise in synthesis/metals processing and materials characterization, he has authored publications and holds U.S. patents in a variety of technical areas with commercial and military applications. Aziz I. Asphahani is a retired executive of Carus Chemical Company, Peru, Illinois. He completed mathématiques spéciales at the Lycée Janson Sailly in Paris in 1967 and received a diplôme ingénieur-physique from the Ecole Centrale de Paris in 1970. He earned his Ph.D. in materials science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1975. Dr. Asphahani joined Carus Chemical Company in 1995 as president and CEO after spending more than 19 years in the specialty metal industry with Haynes International, Inc. (formerly a division of Cabot Corporation) and Cabval, its joint venture with Vallourec Industries. He served as president of Cabval and as vice president of Haynes, general manager of corrosion alloys, director of R&D, group leader, and corrosion engineer (1975-1994). Dr. Asphahani served on the

OCR for page 27
Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century board of directors of Haynes International, Inc., and Cabval. He is presently serving on the board of directors of Carus Corporation. Dr. Asphahani holds eight patents, authored 61 papers on high alloys and corrosion control, and contributed to over 300 technical presentations at major conferences and special symposia. Two products of his patents won the 1984 Vaaler award and the 1991 R&D 100 award. Dr. Asphahani is a fellow of the American Society for Materials (ASM) and of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE). He is a member of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS), the Electrochemical Society, and the American Water Works Association. He is an ASM past president and past chair of the Technical Awareness Council. He served as the chairman of the Corrosion Committee of MPC (Materials Properties Council) and on the ASTM-G1 Corrosion Committee. He has also served on the board of directors of NACE International, the board of trustees of the Chemical Educational Foundation, and the board of directors of the American Chemistry Council. Dr. Asphahani is presently serving on the board of directors of the ASM Materials Education Foundation (of which he was past chairman) and the NACE Foundation. Matthew R. Begley earned his B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from Penn State University and graduated with a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1995. He was a Gordon McKay postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University from 1995 to 1997 and a visiting assistant professor at Harvard in the fall of 1998. Dr. Begley is currently an associate professor in mechanical and aerospace engineering, with appointments in materials science and engineering and electrical and computer engineering. Dr. Begley’s research and teaching interests are focused on the development of handheld devices for molecular diagnostics, with an emphasis on the implications of nanoscale material behavior for device performance. George E. Dieter is the emeritus professor of mechanical engineering and the Glenn L. Martin Institute professor of engineering at the University of Maryland, having retired as dean of the College of Engineering in 1994. Prior to this, Dr. Dieter was professor of engineering and director of the Processing Research Institute at Carnegie Mellon, as well as the chair of metallurgical engineering at Drexel University. He started his career at the Engineering Research Laboratory of the DuPont Company. His teaching and research interests are engineering design, materials processing, and quality engineering. Dr. Dieter is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the AAAS, ASM International, TMS, and the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). He was national president of ASEE and received the Lamme Medal, its highest honor. His book Mechanical Metallurgy has been in print since 1961 in various editions, while his book Engineering Design: A Materials and Processing Approach is in its third edition (2000). He was the editor of Volume 20 of the ASM Handbook “Materials Selection and Design,” published in 1997. He has been active on many National Research Council committees, including the National Materials Advisory Board. Dr. Dieter received a bachelor’s degree in metallurgical engineering from the Drexel Institute of Technology and a Sc.D. from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Mellon). Robert H. Dodds earned a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in 1978. Before returning to UIUC in 1987, he served on the faculty at the University of Kansas for 9 years. He has been an active researcher in the field of nonlinear fracture mechanics and computational methods for the past 25 years. His current research enjoys support from external sponsors including the U.S. Navy, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the U.S. Air Force, and NASA (Ames, Marshall). Dr. Dodds has published more than 100 journal papers in the areas of fracture mechanics, computational methods, and software engineering. From 1996 through 2005, he served as co-editor of Engineering Fracture Mechanics, a leading international journal on fracture mechanics for the past 30 years. He is an associate editor for three other international journals on these topics and actively participates in related

OCR for page 27
Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century technical societies, including the American Society for Testing and Materials (E-8). He recently served on a technical advisory panel for the national research project on performance of steel buildings during strong earthquakes, which was sponsored by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Professor Dodds’s research awards include the American Society of Civil Engineers’ Walter L. Huber Research Prize (1992) and its Nathan M. Newmark Medal (2001); the George R. Irwin Medal from ASTM (2000) and the 2001 Award of Merit with fellow status from ASTM; the 2000 Munro Prize for best paper published in the International Journal of Engineering Structures; the 2002 speaker for the Southwest Mechanics Tour; and honorary fellow of the International Congress on Fracture in 2005. He has delivered more than 30 invited keynote and plenary lectures at international conferences. In 1997, Dr. Dodds was named the inaugural holder of the Nathan and Anne M. Newmark Professorship in Civil Engineering at the University of Illinois. In 2000, he became the first holder of the M.T. Geoffrey Endowed Yeh Chair in Civil Engineering, and in 2004 he became the 13th head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Fiona M. Doyle is a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB). She is also the executive associate dean and associate dean for academic affairs in the UCB College of Engineering. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in metallurgy and materials science from the University of Cambridge, England, and an M.Sc. in extractive metallurgy and a Ph.D. in hydrometallurgy from Imperial College, University of London. Dr. Doyle’s main area of research is the solution processing of minerals and materials. She studies processes such as the leaching and transformation of minerals, solvent extraction, organic-phase reactions, hydrolysis, precipitation, crystallization, and electrochemical reactions from a fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic perspective. Much of her work aims to adapt the techniques used in the primary production of commodity minerals and metals for the commercial-scale processing of value-added advanced materials. She also has ongoing research into improving the environmental impact and energy utilization associated with the production of minerals and materials. Dr. Doyle has served the state of California in assessing the environmental impact of mining and mineral processing operations and developing policies for addressing the environmental damage due to historic mining activities. Dr. Doyle is a member of the National Materials Advisory Board and is currently serving as the chair of this panel, the Corrosion Education Workshop Organizing Panel. Daniel J. Dunmire is the special assistant, DoD Corrosion Policy and Oversight in the Office of the Under Secretary (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics). He started his federal career in the Office of the Secretary of Defense in 1984 through the Presidential Management Internship (now fellowship) program. From 1987 through 2002, Mr. Dunmire worked in program and policy acquisition oversight. He received a B.A. in communications from Kent State in 1974 and an M.P.A. from the University of Alabama in Birmingham in 1984, and is currently a Ph.D. candidate at Virginia Tech. Mr. Dunmire received the Office of the Secretary of Defense Medal for Exceptional Civilian Service twice and was a team recipient of the Vice President’s Hammer Award for Acquisition Policy and Deskbook Design. He is a member of the Department of Defense Acquisition Corps, Level III, Program Manager, and is a retired Army Corps of Engineers reservist. David J. Duquette received his Ph.D. in materials science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1968. Following his postgraduate work, he performed research on elevated temperature materials, joining the Rensselaer faculty in 1970. He is the author or co-author of more than 160 scientific publications, primarily in the areas of environmental degradation of materials and electrochemical processing of semiconductor interconnects. He is a recipient of the Whitney Award of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for his contributions to corrosion science and of an Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award. He is a fellow of ASM International and of NACE International.

OCR for page 27
Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century Dr. Duquette’s research interests include the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of metals and alloys, with special reference to their environmental interactions. Current projects include studies of aqueous and elevated-temperature corrosion phenomena, the effects of corrosive environments on fatigue behavior, the environmental cracking of alloys, the role of corrosion science in understanding the planarization of metal interconnects on semiconductor devices, and the electrodeposition of semiconductor interconnects. A fundamental understanding of material–environment interactions is critical to engineering application of metallic materials. Gerald S. Frankel is the DNV Chair professor of materials science and engineering at Ohio State University (OSU) and director of the Fontana Corrosion Center. He earned an Sc.B. in materials science engineering from Brown University in 1978 and an Sc.D. in materials science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1985. Prior to joining OSU in 1995, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the Swiss Federal Technical Institute in Zurich, Switzerland, and then a research staff member at the IBM Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York. He has more than 180 publications, and his primary research interests are in the passivation and localized corrosion of metals and alloys, corrosion inhibition, and protective coatings. He is past chairman of the Corrosion Division of the Electrochemical Society, past chairman of the Research Committee of NACE, and a member of the editorial board of the journal Corrosion. Dr. Frankel is a fellow of NACE International, the Electrochemical Society, and ASM International. He has received the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Research Award for Senior U.S. Scientists, the H.H. Uhlig Educators’ Award from NACE, and the Harrison Faculty Award and Lumley Research Award from the OSU College of Engineering. In 2005 he was on sabbatical at the Max Planck Institut fuer Eisenforschung (Institute for Iron Research) in Düsseldorf, Germany. Dr. Frankel is a member of the NRC’s Corrosion Education Workshop Organizing Panel. Ronald M. Latanision is professor emeritus of materials science and engineering and nuclear engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a principal and practice director of mechanics and materials/metallurgy at Exponent. He is the author or co-author of more than 200 scientific publications, and is founder and cochairman of the New England Science Teachers and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Latanision has been a consultant to industry and government and has been active in organizing international conferences. He was appointed to the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board on June 26, 2002, by President George W. Bush. Dr. Latanision received a B.S. in metallurgy from Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from Ohio State University. During a sabbatical in 1982-1983, he served as a science advisor to the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Science and Technology. Dr. Latanision has served as a member of a number of committees at the National Academies, including several committees on science education, and he also served on the Center for Education advisory board. He is a member of NRC’s Corrosion Education Workshop Organizing Panel and the Committee on Teacher Preparation Programs in the United States. He was a member of the now inactive Committee on Undergraduate Science Education. Mark R. Plichta graduated with high honors from Michigan Technological University with a bachelor’s degree in metallurgical engineering in 1974. He completed his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in metallurgical engineering in 1977 and 1979, respectively, also at Michigan Technological University. Research conducted in fulfillment of the graduate degrees dealt with the thermodynamics, kinetics, and crystallography of solid-state phase transformations in metallic materials. Upon completion of his graduate degrees, Dr. Plichta joined the faculty in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Utah. While at Utah he developed many courses in the areas of phase transformations, kinetics, materials science, and electron microscopy. His research

OCR for page 27
Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century efforts grew to include the microstructural development and stability of metal and ceramic materials. In 1983 Dr. Plichta received the Ralph R.Teetor Educational Award from the Society of Automotive Engineers. In 1984, Dr. Plichta returned to Michigan Technological University as associate professor of metallurgical and materials engineering. In addition to continuing his work on research interests in microstructural evolution in materials, he began to pursue educational and curricular interests. Within the department he served as chair of the undergraduate program committee and the curriculum change committee, which was responsible for the development and implementation of a massive curriculum revision in 1993. He was awarded the State of Michigan Teaching Excellence Award and the Michigan Technological University Distinguished Teaching Award, both in 1990. In the summer of 1997, Dr. Plichta was appointed associate dean for academic programs in the College of Engineering. His responsibilities in this position included curricular reform, issues for women and underrepresented groups, ABET and NCA accreditations, international engineering experiences, and distance learning activities. In 1998, he was the principal investigator on a large NSF grant for systemic engineering education reformation. Under this award, Michigan Tech developed a unique educational experience called the Enterprise Program, within which students operate their own on-campus companies as part of the engineering degree requirements. In October 2002, Dr. Plichta was named chair of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. In the summer of 2003, he was appointed Foundry Education Foundation key professor at Michigan Tech. Dr. Plichta maintains membership in the American Society for Engineering Education, ASM International, the Metallurgical Society of AIME, the American Ceramic Society, and the Materials Research Society. Luis M. Proenza is the president of the University of Akron, the public research university for northern Ohio. He provides overall leadership to more than 4,500 faculty and staff and oversees an annual budget of $350 million, serving more than 24,000 students in 350 academic programs, including a consortium medical school and three branch campuses. Under Dr. Proenza’s leadership, the University has undertaken several major initiatives, including a $300 million New Landscape for Learning campus enhancement program with 9 new buildings and major additions or renovations of 14 other facilities, a University Park Alliance project supported by the Knight Foundation to revitalize a 40-block neighborhood and commercial area surrounding the campus, and information technology (IT) investments that have established the University of Akron as a national leader in IT and made it one of the most “wired for wireless” universities in the country. Dr. Proenza has brought private donations to an all-time record and garnered two of the largest gifts ever made to the university. He also has expanded its outreach with the creation of two new regional branch campuses, and he has spearheaded an innovative enrollment management program that has generated significant increases in new and transfer students. Dr. Proenza’s marketing and leadership initiatives earned him the 2005 Chief Executive Leadership Award from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education District V and the 2006 Northeast Ohio Regional Vision Award from the Northeast Ohio Regional Leadership Taskforce. He also was recipient of the 2001 Executive of the Year Award by the Sales and Marketing Executives Association of Akron; along with recognition from Crain’s Cleveland Business, which named him to its Power Pack, the list of the 50 most influential people in Northeast Ohio, and from Inside Business, which listed him among the Power 100. In 2001, President George W. Bush appointed Dr. Proenza to serve on the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), the nation’s highest-level policy advisory group for science and technology. The group advises the president and assists the Office of Science and Technology Policy and the National Science and Technology Council in securing private-sector involvement in their activities. Dr. Proenza has served on PCAST panels on U.S. research and development investments, technology transfer, energy efficiency and advanced manufacturing, and also serves on panels addressing nanotechnology, alternative energy, and IT.

OCR for page 27
Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century Dr. Proenza is a member of the Council on Competitiveness, where he serves on the executive committee, and on the National Innovation Initiative Leadership Council. In addition, he sits on the advisory board of the U.S. Secretary of Energy and chairs the Science and Mathematics Education Task Force. He also is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Dr. Proenza chairs the Ohio Supercomputer Center and serves on the boards of the State Science and Technology Institute, the Great Lakes Science Center, the Ohio Chamber of Commerce, and OneCommunity. In 2003, he was appointed by Governor Robert Taft to Ohio’s Third Frontier Advisory Board. He previously served on the NAS-NRC Committee on Vision, the National Biotechnology Policy Board, the U.S. Arctic Research Commission (appointed by former President George H.W. Bush), and as advisor for science and technology policy to Alaska governor Walter J. Hickel. Before coming to the University of Akron, Dr. Proenza was vice president for research and dean of the Graduate School at Purdue University. He previously served as vice president for academic affairs and research and as vice chancellor for research and dean of the graduate school at the University of Alaska. Dr. Proenza holds a bachelor’s degree from Emory University (1965), a master’s degree from the Ohio State University (1966), and a doctorate from the University of Minnesota (1971). He joined the faculty of the University of Georgia in 1971, where his research was continuously supported by grants from the National Eye Institute, including a Research Career Development Award, and where he also served as assistant to the university’s president and university liaison for science and technology policy. In Ohio, he is past president of the Inter-University Council and serves on the Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education, on the Executive Council of the Northeast Ohio Technology Coalition (NorTech), and on the Executive Committee of the Greater Akron Chamber of Commerce. He also serves on the Board of the Akron Roundtable. Dr. Proenza is a member of many professional, scholarly, and honorary organizations; is the recipient of several awards and honors; and has published numerous articles in nationally and internationally recognized journals. In addition, he edited and co-edited two books. He is invited frequently to speak throughout the country and abroad, and his presentations have appeared in Vital Speeches of the Day and The Executive Speaker. He is often quoted on issues affecting higher education, research, and economic development. David H. Rose is the Manager of Advanced Programs for Quanterion Solutions, Inc., a small business in Utica, New York. His responsibilities include directing a variety of technical projects for both commercial and government customers. He also supports the Reliability Information Analysis Center (RIAC), a DoD-sponsored information analysis center (IAC) operated by Quanterion as part of a team lead by Wyle Laboratories. From June 1998 through November 2006, Mr. Rose was the director of the Advanced Materials, Manufacturing, and Testing Information Analysis Center (AMMTIAC) and its predecessor, the Advanced Materials and Processes Technology Information Analysis Center (AMPTIAC). Like RIAC and seven other-DoD sponsored IACs, these centers were chartered to improve the productivity of researchers, engineers, and program managers in the defense research, development, and acquisition communities by collecting, analyzing, synthesizing, and disseminating worldwide scientific and technical information in clearly defined, specialized fields or subject areas. While at AMMTIAC and AMPTIAC, he supported both government organizations and industrial base contractors involved with materials selection efforts. This experience provided him with insight into how materials selection is accomplished, which subsequently led to his questioning whether existing undergraduate engineering curricula, and the knowledge they provide, result in adequate consideration of corrosion during product design. Mr. Rose is a retired U.S. Air Force officer. He holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Washington, a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Dayton, and completed his Ph.D. course work and candidacy examinations in materials engineering, also at the University of Dayton. His Air Force assignments included a tour to the Air Force

OCR for page 27
Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century Plant Representative’s Office at the Boeing Company in Seattle. He also spent two tours at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), including 5 years at the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, where he conducted research on composite materials, and 2 years at the Electromagnetics and Reliability Directorate, where he conducted research on material failure modes and the impact they have on the reliability of plastic encapsulated microcircuits. He holds a U.S. patent for developing a process to reduce residual stresses by prestressing fibers in composite materials. Lee W. Saperstein is dean emeritus of the School of Mines and Metallurgy and professor emeritus of Mining Engineering at the University of Missouri–Rolla (UMR); he served as dean from July 1993 to June 2004; he retired from UMR at the end of December 2006. He has a B.S. in mining engineering from the Montana School of Mines (1964), now Montana Tech of the University of Montana, and a D.Phil. in engineering science from Oxford University (1967), which he attended as a Rhodes Scholar. He was a faculty member in mining engineering at Penn State from 1967 to 1987 and for the following 6 years at the University of Kentucky, where he was also chair of the Department of Mining Engineering. While at Kentucky, he participated in an interim management team for the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, where he was assistant director for clean coal fuels. His research specialization has been in the environmental engineering of mines. He has published papers, proceeding articles, book chapters, and informal articles on this subject. He created Penn State’s first surface mining design course and he has taught courses in senior design, explosives engineering, erosion and sediment control, and reclamation engineering. He also has supervised training programs for miners, including health and safety training and job-skills training. In addition to his activities at ABET, he is chair of the Missouri Society of Professional Engineers’ educational advisory board, member of the American Society for Engineering Education’s engineering deans council (and former member of its public policy committee), former chair of the Mineral and Energy Resources Section, and one-time chair of the Board on Natural Resources of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. He is a distinguished member of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME-AIME), which also gave him the Ivan B. Rahn Award for Education. He also received the SME President’s Citation for services to education. He has chaired SME’s education board, its research council, and the Erskine Ramsay Medal award committee. Montana Tech of the University of Montana granted him the distinguished alumni award. He is listed in Who’s Who in America. He is licensed as a professional engineer in three states. Dr. Saperstein has served on four state committees of selection for the Rhodes Scholarship. Within ABET, he served as president in 1999-2000 and is completing 23 years of service to ABET. He has been representative director for SME-AIME as well as secretary, president, and past president of its board of directors. He served as chair, 1989-1990, of the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC). As an EAC commissioner, he led evaluation teams to 13 universities, and as an officer, he edited the reports of 75 more. As chair, he dealt with 96 institutions. Prior to being EAC chair, he chaired the Criteria Committee when it devised the concept of “engineering topics” and wrote the first references to “program objectives” and “outcome assessments.” A member of ABET’s Strategic Planning Committee, he was named a fellow of ABET and most recently served as chair of the ad hoc Task Force on Governance, which has delivered a new constitution, bylaws, and rules of procedure to ABET. He is a holder of its Linton E. Grinter Distinguished Service Award. Robert E. Schafrik is currently the general manager of the Materials and Process Engineering Department at GE Aviation. He is responsible for developing the advanced materials and processes used in GE’s aeronautical turbine engines and their marine and industrial derivatives. He oversees the materials application engineering activities supporting GE Aviation’s global design engineering, manufacturing, and field support activities. He also operates a state-of-the-art in-house laboratory for advanced materials development, characterization, and failure analysis. He heads the GE Infrastructure Materials Council, which includes GE Energy, GE Transportation, and GE Water. Prior to joining GE in November 1997, he

OCR for page 27
Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century served in two concurrent positions within the National Research Council, which he joined in 1991: director, National Materials Advisory Board, and director, Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. Under his direction, 33 final reports for studies were issued that addressed significant national issues in materials and manufacturing. Dr. Schafrik also served in the U.S. Air Force in a variety of R&D and system acquisition capacities; he retired as a lieutenant colonel. He has a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from Ohio State University, an M.S. in information systems from George Mason University, an M.S. in aerospace engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, and a B.S. in metallurgy from Case Western Reserve University. John R. Scully is professor and co-director of the Center for Electrochemical Science and Engineering at the University of Virginia, which he joined in 1990. Before that, Dr. Scully served as the senior member of the technical staff in the metallurgy department of Sandia National Laboratories. His research interests focus on the relationships between material structure and composition and properties related to environmental degradation, including hydrogen embrittlement, stress corrosion cracking, localized corrosion, and passivity of materials. His research also includes advanced aluminum-, magnesium-, titanium-, ferrous-, and nickel-based alloys, stainless steels, and aluminum-based intermetallic compounds, as well as development of methodologies for predicting the lifetime of engineering materials used in corrosive environments. A recent interest has been nano-engineered materials, including multifunctional metallic glasses that deliver novel barrier, sacrificial anode, and chemical inhibition properties. Dr. Scully received his bachelor of environmental science and his M.S. from The Johns Hopkins University. He served as a technical consultant to the space shuttle’s Columbia Accident Investigation Board in 2003, was a member of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Corrosion Control in 2004, and was the chair and organizer of the 2004 Gordon Conference on Aqueous Corrosion. He is a member of the Corrosion Education Workshop Organizing Panel. Helena Seelinger graduated from Michigan State University with a degree in international relations and a minor in journalism, received her M.B.A. from the University of Houston, and earned ASAE Certified Association Executive status in 2007. She joined NACE in 1986 as a technical editor in the standards division and since has served as director of technical activities, director of education, and interim executive director. Ms. Seelinger now serves as Director of the NACE Foundation and senior director of new business and program development at NACE International. As staff director of the NACE Foundation, Ms. Seelinger works with the foundation’s board to implement programs, primarily at the high school and undergraduate levels, to inspire students to pursue a career in the field of corrosion science or technologies. This involves the implementation of industry internships for undergraduates, scholarship and award programs, travel assistance for college students to attend NACE meetings, a partnership with the ASM Foundation to fund high school teacher camps that provide resources and exciting ideas to make the teaching of corrosion interesting and inspiring, and working with universities to establish degree programs in the area of corrosion control. She also oversees fundraising events and corporate campaigns to secure funding for the student and teacher programs. Ramesh Sharma is a senior engineering fellow at Raytheon Missile Systems in Tucson. He is also an adjunct professor at the University of Arizona in Tucson, where he teaches practical materials engineering and cost-effective design. As a visiting professor at the Naval Postgraduate School he teaches the fundamentals of tactical missiles. His main emphasis is on practical, reliable, and affordable engineering. He obtained a B.Tech. (Hons) in metallurgical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India, a master of metallurgy in iron and steel technology from the University of Sheffield, United Kingdom, and a D.Phil. in physical metallurgy from the University of Oxford, United Kingdom. He has about 40 years of experience in industry and university teaching. He has experience in a wide range of fields such as corrosion management, tribology, alloy development, strengthening

OCR for page 27
Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century mechanisms, materials for high-strength and high-temperature applications, extraction metallurgy, rolling, casting, forging, extrusion, powder metallurgy, welding, and electronic packaging. His main efforts have been in optimum selection of materials and manufacturing processes, cost reduction, and producibility. He supports all programs at Raytheon. Several of his ideas offering annual savings worth millions of dollars have been successfully implemented. He is a pioneer in the development of surface mount technology and has written several papers. Lewis E. Sloter, II, is the DoD associate director for materials and structures within the Office of the Director, Defense Research and Engineering. As a senior materials technologist he is responsible for the technical oversight of DoD science and technology activities in materials, processes, and structures associated with current and future defense systems and for technical assessments associated with materials, processes, materials manufacturing, and engineering applications. Prior to joining the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Dr. Sloter was a program officer in the Office of Naval Research in Washington, D.C.; materials technology manager and propulsion technology manager, and metals section head at the Naval Air Systems Command, also in Washington, D.C.; and lead materials engineer and senior specialist for Vought Corporation in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Sloter is a recipient of the DoD Exceptional Civilian Service Award and a member of several professional societies and honor societies, including Alpha Sigma Mu, Phi Kappa Phi, and Sigma Xi. He holds a B.S. in metallurgy and materials science and history and a Ph.D. in metallurgy and materials science and engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University and an M.S. in materials engineering from Drexel University. When he did research, his primary academic interests were in welding metallurgy, corrosion fatigue, biomaterials, and forensic engineering. He has published and lectured on biomedical materials, welding metallurgy, armor, military aircraft, forensic engineering, and materials policy and is a registered professional engineer. Mark D. Soucek obtained a B.S. in chemistry from Eastern Illinois University and an M.S. from Illinois State University with a thesis project in physical organic photochemistry. In 1990, he obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in inorganic chemistry with an emphasis on stabilization of metal clusters for catalysis. From 1990 to 1993, he was an NRC postdoctoral fellow at the NASA-Langley Research Center working on the metal catalysis of high-performance polymers. From 1993 through 2001, Dr. Soucek was an assistant and then associate professor at North Dakota State University in the Department of Polymers and Coatings, focusing his research on coatings science. In 1999, Dr. Soucek won a Roon Award for his work in thermosetting latexes, and in 2000 he won the first Gordon Award for his work on nanocomposite polyurethane coatings as chromate replacements coatings for aircraft. In 2001, Dr. Soucek moved to the Department of Polymer Engineering at the University of Akron, where he is an associate professor. In 2003, Dr. Soucek was selected as a Gordon Award finalist for his work in UV-curable bio-based polymers. In 2004, he was awarded the Radtech Innovation Award for his work in UV-curable coatings. In 2004 and 2005, Dr. Soucek won an honorable mention Gordon Award for core-shell latex work and UV-curing of unsaturated polyesters. He has written more than 100 research papers, all in coating science. Neil G. Thompson is founder and chairman of CC Technologies, an international engineering and research firm located in Ohio and Alberta and established in 1985. CC Technologies specializes in materials evaluation, pipeline and facilities integrity, corrosion control, and fitness for service. In 2005, CC Technologies joined the Norwegian DNV group of companies, where Dr. Thompson is currently interim director of a new corporate research group, DNV Research & Innovation, which is the first activity of its kind operating outside Norway for DNV.

OCR for page 27
Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century Dr. Thompson has a B.S. and an M.S in materials science engineering from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, and a Ph.D. in materials science engineering from Vanderbilt University. He has worked in corrosion science for the past 30 years. Since 1982, he has performed numerous projects on underground corrosion and cathodic protection. He has published over 60 technical papers and a book on electrochemical testing and has authored or co-authored six patents in corrosion monitoring. Dr. Thompson was the 2005-2006 president of NACE International, the world’s leading professional association of corrosion specialists, and has been a NACE member for 29 years. He served on DoD’s Defense Science Board and is a member of Alabama’s Engineering Hall of Fame. Dr. Thompson was co-author of a congressional study on the economic impact of corrosion to the U.S. economy. Dr. Thompson has grown CC Technologies-DNV from a 2-person company to 175 and employs the largest number of corrosion scientists in North America. CC Technologies operates worldwide on an array of difficult corrosion-related issues facing some of the world’s largest companies.