Appendix A
Committee Membership

John L. Anderson (Chair), (NAE) is provost, university vice president, and a professor of chemical engineering at Case Western Reserve University. He served on the faculty of Cornell University for 5 years before joining the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University in 1976, where he served until 2004. Dr. Anderson is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and has chaired the NAE chemical engineering section. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. He is the author of more than 100 journal articles and book chapters. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Delaware and his PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois.


Alan Berman is an independent consultant whose current clients include the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University and the Center for Naval Analyses. Dr. Berman’s expertise includes Navy research and development investments, space operations capabilities, information operations, and command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance programs. Dr. Berman served as dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami, where he was responsible for the graduate programs in physical oceanography, marine biology, geology, geophysics, applied ocean science, and underwater acoustics; and as director of research at



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Countering the Threat of Improvised Explosive Devices: Basic Research Opportunities - Abbreviated Version Appendix A Committee Membership John L. Anderson (Chair), (NAE) is provost, university vice president, and a professor of chemical engineering at Case Western Reserve University. He served on the faculty of Cornell University for 5 years before joining the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University in 1976, where he served until 2004. Dr. Anderson is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and has chaired the NAE chemical engineering section. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. He is the author of more than 100 journal articles and book chapters. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Delaware and his PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois. Alan Berman is an independent consultant whose current clients include the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University and the Center for Naval Analyses. Dr. Berman’s expertise includes Navy research and development investments, space operations capabilities, information operations, and command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance programs. Dr. Berman served as dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami, where he was responsible for the graduate programs in physical oceanography, marine biology, geology, geophysics, applied ocean science, and underwater acoustics; and as director of research at

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Countering the Threat of Improvised Explosive Devices: Basic Research Opportunities - Abbreviated Version the Naval Research Laboratory, where he administered broad programs in basic and applied research. Charles A. Bouman is professor of electrical and computer engineering and biomedical engineering at Purdue University. His research focuses on the use of statistical image models, multiscale techniques, and fast algorithms in applications that include medical and electronic imaging. Dr. Bouman received his PhD in electrical engineering from Princeton University and his MS degree from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and of the Society for Imaging Science and Technology. William F. Brinkman (NAS) is a senior research physicist in the Physics Department at Princeton University. He retired as vice president for research from Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, on September 30, 2001. In that position, his responsibilities included the direction of all research to enable the advancement of the technology underlying Lucent Technologies’s products. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served on a number of national committees, including chairmanship of the NAS Physics Survey and the National Research Council Committee on Solid-State Sciences. He is past president of the American Physical Society and is currently chairman of the National Laboratories Operations Board of the Department of Energy. Dr. Brinkman was the recipient of the 1994 George E. Pake Prize. Martha Crenshaw is the Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor of Global Issues and Democratic Thought and professor of government at Wesleyan University, in Middletown, Connecticut, where she has taught since 1974. She has written extensively on political terrorism. Her recent work includes the chapters “Coercive Diplomacy and the Response to Terrorism” in The United States and Coercive Diplomacy, published by the Institute of Peace, and “Terrorism, Strategies, and Grand Strategies” in Attacking Terrorism published by Georgetown University Press. She serves on the Executive Board of Women in International Security and chairs the American Political Science Association Task Force on Political Violence and Terrorism. The International Society of Political Psychology, of which she is a past president, awarded her its Neville Sanford award for Professional Contributions to Political Psychology in 2004. She received her PhD from the University of Virginia in 1973. Her BA is from Newcomb College of Tulane University.

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Countering the Threat of Improvised Explosive Devices: Basic Research Opportunities - Abbreviated Version Mary Lou Fultz is associate director of the US Postal Service Crime Laboratory. Dr. Fultz was chief of the Forensic Science Laboratory for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. She received her PhD in chemistry from the University of Maryland. William J. Hurley has been with the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) since 1985 and is currently assistant director of the System Evaluation Division. From 1975 to 1985, Dr. Hurley was with the Center for Naval Analyses. Dr. Hurley’s research has addressed a variety of defense issues with emphases in joint forces, analytical methods, advanced technologies, naval forces, and undersea warfare. He has directed or been coauthor of over 30 studies sponsored principally by the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Navy. In 1993, Dr. Hurley received IDA’s Andrew J. Goodpaster Award for Excellence in Research. In addition to his research responsibilities, Dr. Hurley was the associate program director and then program director of the Defense Science Study Group (DSSG) from 1991 to 1998. The DSSG is a program of education and study that introduces outstanding young professors of science and engineering to military systems and organizations and current issues of national security. The program is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Dr. Hurley’s academic background is in mathematical physics. He received a BS in physics from Boston College (1965) and a PhD in physics from the University of Rochester (1971), and he held research positions at Syracuse University (1970-1972) and at the University of Texas (1972-1975). Anil K. Jain is a University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Michigan State University. He received his BTech from the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur and his MS and PhD from Ohio State University. His research interests include statistical pattern recognition, computer vision, and biometric authentication. He received awards for best papers in 1987 and 1991 from the Pattern Recognition Society. He also received the 1996 IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks Best Paper Award. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Association for Computing Machinery, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Association for Pattern Recognition. He has received Fulbright, Guggenheim, and Humboldt awards. Holder of six patents in fingerprint-matching, he is the author of a number of books, including Handbook of Face Recognition and Handbook of Fingerprint Recognition. He is a member of the National Research Council study team on Whither Biometrics. Harry W. Jenkins, USMC (Ret.), is an independent consultant and was the director of business development and congressional liaison at ITT

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Countering the Threat of Improvised Explosive Devices: Basic Research Opportunities - Abbreviated Version Industries-Defense, where he was responsible for activities in support of tactical communication systems and airborne electronic warfare between the Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, National Guard, and appropriate committees in Congress. Major General Jenkins’s operational background is in expeditionary warfare, particularly in regard to its mission use of command, control, communication, computers, and intelligence (C4I) systems. During Desert Storm, Major General Jenkins served as the commanding general of the Fourth Marine Expeditionary Brigade and directed operational planning, training and employment of the ground units, aviation assets, and command and control systems in the 17,000-member amphibious force. His last position before retirement from the US Marine Corps was director of expeditionary warfare for the chief of naval operations. In that position, he initiated a detailed program for C4I systems improvements for large-deck amphibious ships, managed all programs of naval mine warfare, and reorganized the Navy’s unmanned aerial vehicle efforts for operations from aircraft carriers and amphibious ships. He is a member of numerous professional societies, including the Marine Corps Association, the Marine Corps Aviation Association, the Expeditionary Warfare Division of the Naval Defense Industry Association, the Navy League, and the Adjutants General Association of the United States. Major General Jenkins is a member of the Naval Studies Board. Edward H. Kaplan (NAE/IOM) is the William N. and Marie A. Beach Professor of Management Sciences, professor of public health, and professor of engineering at Yale University. He received his bachelor’s degree from McGill University and proceeded to graduate study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he completed three master’s degrees (in operations research, city planning, and mathematics) in addition to his doctorate in urban studies. Dr. Kaplan is an expert in operations research, mathematical modeling, and statistics and has recently developed novel methods for quantitatively evaluating operational effectiveness of suicide-bomber-detector schemes. Dr. Kaplan is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Engineering. Alexander MacLachlan (NAE), recently a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Radioactive Waste Management, is coauthor of The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities, Costs, Barriers and R&D Needs. Before his retirement in March 1996, Dr. MacLachlan was deputy under secretary for R&D management at the US Department of Energy and held various other positions in the department. Earlier, he was employed by E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company for 36 years, where he was senior vice president for research and development and chief technical officer

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Countering the Threat of Improvised Explosive Devices: Basic Research Opportunities - Abbreviated Version from 1986 to 1993 and a member of DuPont’s operating group from 1990 to 1993. He is currently president of the University of Delaware Research Foundation. Dr. MacLachlan received a B.S. in chemistry from Tufts University (1954) and a PhD in physical organic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1957). He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1992. Andrew W. Moore directs Google’s Pittsburgh research facility and is a professor of robotics and computer science at the School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University. His main research interest is datamining—developing algorithms for finding all the potentially useful and statistically meaningful patterns in massive sources of data. His research strives to find real-world applications through the understanding of fundamental data structures, algorithms, and mathematics. Dr. Moore received his PhD in computer science and his undergraduate degree in mathematics from Cambridge University. After a postdoctoral fellowship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he accepted his current position at Carnegie Mellon University. Jimmie C. Oxley is professor of chemistry at the University of Rhode Island and codirector of the Forensic Science Partnership. After receiving her PhD from the University of British Columbia, Dr. Oxley joined the faculty of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, where she founded a PhD program in explosives and created the thermal-hazards research group. Dr. Oxley’s laboratory specializes in the study of energetic materials. Most of the studies examine how and how fast these materials decompose. The goal is to understand their stability so that they may be handled safely. She received her BS from University of California, San Diego (1971); MS from California State University, Northridge; and her PhD from the University of British Columbia (1983). Amy Sands is provost and academic vice president of the Monterey Institute of International Studies. Dr. Sands formerly served as deputy director of the Center for Nonproliferation Studies. From August 1994 to June 1996, she was assistant director of the Intelligence, Verification, and Information Management Bureau at the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA). Reporting to the ACDA director, she was responsible for managing the development of verification and compliance policy for relevant arms-control and nonproliferation activities, for ACDA’s computer support and analysis activities, and for liaison with the intelligence community. Dr. Sands has taught courses at Boston College on political development, terrorism, and low-level violence and worked as the country risk manager at the Bank of New England. Dr. Sands holds

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Countering the Threat of Improvised Explosive Devices: Basic Research Opportunities - Abbreviated Version a BA in political science from the University of Wisconsin and earned her MA, MALD, and PhD from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. Joseph E. Shepherd is a professor of aeronautics at the California Institute of Technology (CIT) in Pasadena. He teaches and conducts research on fluid mechanics, chemistry, thermodynamics, structural mechanics of explosions, and related applications, such as propulsion. Dr. Shepherd has been a consultant and investigator on projects for the US Department of Energy, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NASA, various national laboratories, the National Transportation Safety Board, and the aerospace and chemical industries. He started his career in explosions with his doctoral studies at CIT, where he received his degree in 1980 on “Dynamics of Vapor Explosions.” William C. Trogler is professor of chemistry at the University of California, San Diego. His current research focuses on inorganic chemistry applied to problems of environmental and technological interest. Dr. Trogler’s research group is exploring the use of photoluminescent and electroluminescent silole polymers as sensors for detecting electron-deficient organics and explosives, the design of sensors specific for the fluorophosphonate G nerve agents, micellar catalysts incorporated into a porous silicon sensor to detect Sarin, and chemoresponsive transistors as manufacturable chemical sensors. He received his BA and MA from Johns Hopkins University in 1974 and his PhD from the California Institute of Technology in 1977. Jonathan Young is head of the Safety and Risk Analysis Group of the Environmental Technology Division at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He has over 40 years of experience in systems and safety engineering, safety analysis, probabilistic safety assessment, and system-security activities in the aerospace and nuclear industries. He is principal instructor and course developer for numerous probabilistic safety-assessment courses, both in the United States and abroad. Mr. Young received his BA in mathematics from Lincoln University.