Study

Populationa

Arm (N)

Handling of Dropouts and % Completed Tx by Arm

PTSD Outcome Measure

Carlson et al., 1998

Male, combat

Total (35)

NR

IES

EMDR (10)

100%

CS (13)

92.3%

UC (12)

100%

Zlotnick, 1997

Female, childhood sexual abuse

Total (48)i

Completers

DTS

CS (17)

71%

WL (16)

75%

Silver et al., 1995

Male, combat

Total (83)

NR

PRF

EMDR (13)

 

CS-R (9)

 

CS-B (6)

 

MC (55)

 

Foa et al., 1991

Female, sexual assault

Total (55)

NR

PTSD severity rating

CS-SIT (17)

82.4%

E (14)

71.4%

CS (SC)j (14)

78.6%

WL (10)

100%

aIn the population column, male alone or female alone denotes that at least 80% of the study population was male or female. If only one trauma type is listed, at least 80% of the study population reported that type of trauma.

bPTSD outcome measure change data were obtained either directly from the study, when provided, or by subtracting data reported at treatment completion (not follow-up data) from baseline data (before treatment began). Average baseline score when reported or when baseline scores for all arms are nearly the same; otherwise, baseline scores listed individually in order of arm.

cSeeking-safety therapy.

dRelapse prevention therapy (a substance abuse treatment was used as a comparator, not as PTSD treatment).

brainwave neurofeedback. The usefulness of one of the two trials of eclectic psychotherapy was severely limited by a 42 percent dropout rate handled with LOCF (Lindauer et al., 2005); the other, conducted among police officers (Gersons et al., 2000), had no major limitations and showed a significant difference in loss of PTSD diagnosis (Gersons et al., 2000; Lindauer et al., 2005). The trial of hypnotherapy and psychodynamic therapy had only one major limitation and showed a significant decrease



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