Appendix G
Committee Member Biographies

Alfred O. Berg, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, where he served as department chair from 1998 to 2007. Dr. Berg received his professional education at Washington University, St. Louis, University of Missouri, and the University of Washington. He is board certified in Family Medicine and in General Preventive Medicine and Public Health. Dr. Berg’s research has focused on clinical epidemiology in primary care settings. He has been active on several expert panels using evidence-based methods to develop clinical guidelines, including chairmanship of the United States Preventive Services Task Force, cochair of the otitis media panel convened by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (now the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality), chair and moderator of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) STD Treatment Guidelines panel, member of the American Medical Association (AMA)/CDC panel producing Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services, and member of the Institute of Medicine’s Immunization Safety Review Committee. Dr. Berg is a member of the Institute of Medicine.


Naomi Breslau, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. Dr. Breslau received her L.L.B. at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, her M.A. at New York University (NYU), and her Ph.D. at Case Western Reserve University. She is a psychiatric epidemiologist and sociologist who has contributed to the epidemiological study of numerous psychiatric conditions and behavioral disturbances, most prominently posttraumatic stress disorder and tobacco



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Appendix G Committee Member Biographies Alfred O. Berg, M.D., M.P.H., is a professor in the Department of Fam- ily Medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, where he served as department chair from 1998 to 2007. Dr. Berg received his professional education at Washington University, St. Louis, University of Missouri, and the University of Washington. He is board certified in Family Medicine and in General Preventive Medicine and Public Health. Dr. Berg’s research has focused on clinical epidemiology in primary care settings. He has been active on several expert panels using evidence-based methods to develop clinical guidelines, including chairmanship of the United States Preventive Services Task Force, cochair of the otitis media panel convened by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (now the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality), chair and moderator of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) STD Treatment Guidelines panel, member of the American Medical Association (AMA)/CDC panel produc- ing Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services, and member of the In- stitute of Medicine’s Immunization Safety Review Committee. Dr. Berg is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Naomi Breslau, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. Dr. Breslau received her L.L.B. at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, her M.A. at New York University (NYU), and her Ph.D. at Case Western Reserve University. She is a psychiatric epidemiologist and sociologist who has contributed to the epidemiological study of numerous psychiatric conditions and behavioral disturbances, most prominently posttraumatic stress disorder and tobacco 0

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0 TREATMENT OF POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER dependence. She has conducted large-scale longitudinal epidemiologic studies, including on PTSD, low birthweight, and migraine headaches in relation to psychiatric comorbidity. The American Association for the Study of Headache honored her work on the prospective relationship between major depression and migraine with the Wolf Award. She has had continued National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant support from 1980. Additionally, for a period of 10 consecutive years, from 1982 to 1992, she was supported by National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) KO2 Research Scientist Development Awards. She is rated as Highly Cited in the ISIHighlyCited. com indexing service. Since 1980, Dr. Breslau has served on numerous NIH review committees. She was a member of the NIMH Consensus Develop- ment Panel for ADHA, the DSM-IV Work Group on GAD Mixed Anxiety- Depression. She served on the Test Committee Behavioral Science, Part I, the National Board of Medical Examiners. From 1982 to 1986, she served as coeditor of Medical Care. She is currently associate editor of two scien- tific journals, Nicotine and Tobacco Research and the International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research and is a member of the Editorial Board of Archives of General Psychiatry. Steven Goodman, M.D., M.H.S., Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Oncology, Pediatrics, Biostatistics, and Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Schools of Public Health and Medicine. He trained in medicine at NYU, in pediatrics at Washington University, and in epidemiology and biostatistics at Johns Hopkins University. His main expertise is in evidence synthesis, clinical trial analysis and design, and foundations of inference. He is editor of the journal Clinical Trials: Journal of the Society for Clinical Trials, and has been statistical editor for the Annals of Internal Medicine since 1987. He was a co-director of the Hopkins Evidence-Based Practice Center and the doctoral program in epidemiology. He is the scientific advisor for the National Blue Cross/Blue Shield Technology Assessment Program, was a member of the Medicare Coverage Advisory Commission, and he has participated in a wide range of Institute of Medicine panels and commit- tees: the Committee on Immunization Safety Review, the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides (Second Biennial Update), Review of Evidence Regarding Link Between Exposure to Agent Orange and Diabetes, Alternative Models to Daubert Standards, and the IOM Workshop on Estimating the Contribution of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death. Muriel D. Lezak, Ph.D., is a neuropsychologist and Professor Emerita in the Department of Neurology at the Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine. Dr. Lezak has many publications on cognitive, emo- tional, and social consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). She has

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0 APPENDIX G conducted numerous workshops and seminars nationally and internation- ally on TBI—its nature, assessment, remediation, and social ramifications. She had a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) grant for a longitudinal study on the neuropsychological consequences of brain injury in a veteran (mostly Vietnam) population. Dr. Lezak has also been a participant of, or consultant to, many committees and study groups concerned with TBI and TBI rehabilitation including the California State Athletic Commis- sion (developing an examination for boxers), the NIH Coma Data Bank Project, and the Conseil Québécois de la Recherche Sociale (developing a data bank for TBI due to motor vehicle accidents). Dr. Lezak was Honor- ary Visiting Professor, West China University of Medical Sciences in 1996, was a recipient of the Annual Award for outstanding service to the brain injured from the Department of Rehabilitation of the Medical College of Virginia, and the Clinical Service Award from the National Head Injury Foundation. Dr. Lezak earned her bachelor degree in general studies and master’s degree in human development from the University of Chicago. Her Ph.D. in clinical psychology is from the University of Portland. She has also served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Traumatic Brain Injury. David Matchar, M.D., is director of the Center for Clinical Health Policy Research, and professor, Department of Medicine, Duke University. After completing his undergraduate degree in statistics at Princeton University, Dr. Matchar earned his medical degree from the University of Maryland. He then completed a research fellowship in general internal medicine at Duke University Medical Center in 1983, and was awarded an A.W. Mellon Fellowship at New England Medical Center in 1984. Dr. Matchar focuses his work on evaluation of clinical practice based on “best evidence” and implementation and evaluation of innovative strategies to promote prac- tice change. For 10 years, he directed the Duke Evidence-based Practice Center, one of 12 such centers designated by AHRQ. Matchar served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Gulf War and Health: A Review of the Medical Literature Relative to the Gulf War Veterans Health. Dr. Matchar focuses his research on evidence synthesis to support informed clinical and policy decisions, and on the implementation and evaluation of innovative strategies to promote practice change. Thomas A. Mellman, M.D., is professor and vice-chair for research, Depart- ment of Psychiatry, Howard University, and associate program director for the Howard University General Clinical Research Center. Dr. Mellman received his medical degree from Case Western Reserve, School of Medi- cine, in 1982. During his 11 years on the faculty at the University of Miami, School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, he

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0 TREATMENT OF POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER led the development of a VA Medical Center and university-based clinical research program on anxiety disorders and PTSD. In 1999, Dr. Mellman joined the faculty of Dartmouth Medical School, Department of Psychiatry. Much of his research and publications have addressed the role of sleep dis- turbance in the pathogenesis and treatment of PTSD. His current research studies patients who are being treated for traumatic injuries and includes early sleep recordings and longitudinal assessment of PTSD. This work has led to several recent publications of sleep-related and other predictors of the early development of PTSD. This includes an article in the Ameri- can Journal of Psychiatry that reports and discusses the implications of a relationship between fragmented patterns of rapid eye movement sleep and the development of PTSD. Dr. Mellman contributed to the recent revision of the Diagnostic and Statistics Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), 4th edition, text revision, and the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies Treatment Guidelines. He recently completed service as a member of the National Institute of Mental Health, Interventions, Initial Review Group, and prior to that served on the Violence and Traumatic Stress Review Committee. David Spiegel, M.D., is the Jack, Lulu & Sam Willson Professor in the School of Medicine, Associate Chair of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Director of the Center on Stress and Health, and Medical Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at Stanford University School of Medi- cine. He is past president of the American College of Psychiatrists. He has published 10 books, 277 scientific journal articles, and 137 chapters on psychosocial oncology, stress, trauma, hypnosis, and psychotherapy. Dr. Spiegel collaborated in the inclusion of Acute Stress Disorder in the DSM-IV. His research is supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Aging, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Fetzer Institute, the Dana Foundation for Brain Sciences, and the Nathan S. Cummings Founda- tion, among others. Dr. Spiegel was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Health and Behavior. William A. Vega, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., is currently a professor in the Depart- ment of Family Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at Uni- versity of California, Los Angeles. Until July 2007 he was professor of psychiatry at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School-University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and director of research, Behavioral Research and Training Institute, University Behavioral Health Care. Dr. Vega has conducted field and clinical research projects on health, mental health, drug abuse, and behavior problems in various regions of the United States and Latin America. His specialty is ethnic subgroup comparative

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0 APPENDIX G research, and his work has been supported by numerous public and private grants. He was cited (2006) in the ISIHighlyCited.com indexing service for inclusion in the top one-half of 1 percent of the most cited researchers worldwide in the social sciences over the past 20 years. Dr. Vega received his undergraduate degree in sociology, his master’s and doctoral degree in criminology, and his Ph.D. in criminology from the University of California, Berkeley. He has been, and is currently, a member of various boards, com- mittees, and councils of the Institute of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, and private foundations.

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