Appendix B
Description of the PETMAN System Feasibility Study

1.0 SCOPE


1.1 GENERAL


The Joint Project Manager for Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Contamination Avoidance (JPM NBCCA) was appointed by the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army for Operations and Research (DUSA (OR)), to identify gaps in the chemical and biological (CB) defense test and evaluation (T&E) infrastructure that may cause a shortfall in the ability to test emerging equipment. As part of accomplishing this responsibility, the Product Director, Test Equipment, Strategy and Support (PD TESS) has been established to manage the effort to identify T&E infrastructure gaps, align supporting efforts, and leverage all T&E assets.


PD TESS has identified the need for a T&E capability that will provide full system evaluation of protective ensembles in CB warfare agent environments. The Protection Ensemble Test Mannequin (PETMAN) system is being developed to test the protection capability of Individual Protection Ensembles (IPE) against CB warfare agents. The PETMAN system will be an articulated robotic mannequin that will perform exercises that simulate war fighter activities. The PETMAN system will be heated to produce body temperatures, able to perspire, and breathe.


This Performance Work Statement (PWS) defines the task requirements for a feasibility study for a PETMAN system design. The intent is to use the



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Appendix B Description of the PETMAN System Feasibility Study 1.0 SCOPE 1.1 gENERAL The Joint Project Manager for Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Contami- nation Avoidance (JPM NBCCA) was appointed by the Deputy Under Sec- retary of the Army for Operations and Research (DUSA (OR)), to identify gaps in the chemical and biological (CB) defense test and evaluation (T&E) infrastructure that may cause a shortfall in the ability to test emerging equipment. As part of accomplishing this responsibility, the Product Direc- tor, Test Equipment, Strategy and Support (PD TESS) has been established to manage the effort to identify T&E infrastructure gaps, align supporting efforts, and leverage all T&E assets. PD TESS has identified the need for a T&E capability that will provide full system evaluation of protective ensembles in CB warfare agent environ- ments. The Protection Ensemble Test Mannequin (PETMAN) system is being developed to test the protection capability of Individual Protection Ensembles (IPE) against CB warfare agents. The PETMAN system will be an articulated robotic mannequin that will perform exercises that simulate war fighter activities. The PETMAN system will be heated to produce body temperatures, able to perspire, and breathe. This Performance Work Statement (PWS) defines the task requirements for a feasibility study for a PETMAN system design. The intent is to use the 

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0 APPENDIX B feasibility study as a tool to trade off requirements versus cost to support a future design effort. 1.3 gOvERNMENT FuRNISHED EquIPMENT / MATERIALS / FACILITIES 1.3.1 PD TESS will provide individual protective equipment technical man- uals (TMs) to facilitate compatibility of the PETMAN system design to individual protective and ancillary equipment defined in 3.2.9-3.2.10.4. 2.0 APPLICAbLE DOCuMENTS The following documents are referenced for the performance of this effort: 1. Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 10-2-022, Chemical Vapor and Aerosol System-Level Testing of Chemical/Biological Protective Suits. 2. DOD-HDBK-743A, Military Handbook Anthropometry of U.S. Military Personnel, 13 February 1991. 3. Fit Factor: M41 PATS technical manual/Protection Factor for equipment 4. Weapons firing information: FM 3-22.9, Rifle Marksmanship M16A1, M16A2/3, M16A4, and M4 CARBINE, April 2003. 5. DA PAM 385-61, Toxic Chemical Agent Safety Standards, 27 March 2002. 3.0 REquIREMENTS 3.2 PETMAN System Feasibility Study. The feasibility study will be based on the PETMAN system performance requirements defined in 3.3.1-3.3.14. The focus of the feasibility study will be on the significant design challenges defined in 3.2.1-3.2.8 of the PETMAN system design in the feasibility study, however all requirements must be considered while conducting the study. The feasibility study will determine the requirements trade-offs and cost differentials associated with each design approach considered in the feasibility study. PETMAN system performance requirements include threshold and objec- tive requirements. Threshold and objective requirements are identified by (T) and (O), respectively. A threshold requirement denotes a minimum ac- ceptable performance requirement while an objective requirement denotes the desired operational capability to meet system performance goals. If a

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 APPENDIX B requirement is not identified by (T) or (O), then the requirement is to be considered a threshold requirement. The PETMAN system is defined as all components to include hardware and software required for operation, maintenance and calibration. 3.2.1 The study will determine the feasibility of designing a PETMAN sys- tem to be tethered (T) or free standing/self-contained (O). A tethered PET- MAN system design must not compromise the integrity of the individual protection ensemble equipment being tested on the PETMAN system. If a tethered design is selected the design must also minimize the impact to the whole ensemble operation. 3.2.2 The study will determine the feasibility of designing a PETMAN sys- tem to be compatible with all individual protection and ancillary equipment as well as weapon systems defined in 3.3.9-3.3.10.4. Areas to be addressed are donning/doffing and proper size/fit of the individual protection equip- ment. The PETMAN system design shall meet the appropriate 50th percen- tile male anthropometric measurements, as defined in DOD-HDBK-743A, Military Handbook Anthropometry of U.S. Military Personnel, to allow for the necessary fit/seal that each piece of protective equipment requires. 3.2.3 The study will determine the feasibility of designing a PETMAN system whose materials of construction will not be significantly degraded by exposure to both traditional chemical agents (T) and Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs) / Toxic Industrial Materials (TIMs) (O) and that can sub- sequently be decontaminated to negligible levels without adversely affecting the operation of the PETMAN system as defined in 3.3.11. 3.2.4 The study will determine the feasibility of designing a PETMAN system with an integrated under ensemble sampling system that will al- low for the collection of agent breakthrough data in real time (1-second increments). 3.2.5 The study will determine the feasibility of designing a PETMAN sys- tem that can simulate fixed skin temperature (by body region), perspiration rate (by body region), and respiration rate (T) and a realistic variability in skin temperature, perspiration rates, and respiration rates based on the amount of physical activity/exertion (O) defined in 3.3.4.1-3.3.4.3. 3.2.6 The study will determine the feasibility of designing a PETMAN system capable of operating in fixed environmental chamber conditions

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 APPENDIX B (T) and a range of environmental chamber conditions (O) as defined in 3.3.6.1-3.3.6.5. 3.2.7 The study will determine the feasibility of designing a PETMAN sys- tem that can perform the Man-in-Simulant Test (MIST) exercises defined in 3.3.8 versus all motions. The study will determine the feasibility of the PETMAN system performing the human-like movements utilizing the de- grees of freedom (DoF) and considerations defined in 3.3.7. 3.2.8 The study will determine the feasibility of designing a PETMAN sys- tem with fully articulated hands and feet that simulate human motion, the minimum amount of hand and foot articulation required for the PETMAN system operation and a partial level of hand and foot articulation. 3.3 PETMAN System Performance Requirements for Feasibility Study. 3.3.1 The PETMAN system shall be robotic and either tethered (T) or free- standing/self-contained (O). A tethered PETMAN system design must not compromise the integrity of the individual protection ensemble equipment being tested on the PETMAN system. If a tethered design is selected the design must also minimize the impact to the whole ensemble operation. Free standing/self-contained is defined as having no external sup- • port. All power, fluids, heating and other components for operation will be contained internal to the PETMAN system. Tethered is defined as having external supports, power require- • ments and telemetry connections. 3.3.2 The PETMAN system shall be capable of operation for twelve (12) hours prior to requiring operational maintenance, three (3) months prior to preventive maintenance and six (6) months prior to calibration. (T) The PETMAN system shall be capable of operation for twenty-four (24) hours prior to requiring operational maintenance, six (6) months prior to preventive maintenance and twelve (12) months prior to calibration. (O) Operational maintenance is defined as the required maintenance procedures to prepare the PETMAN system for each test trial, for example, filling a perspiration reservoir, changing agent samplers or decontamination before the next trial. Preventive maintenance is defined as a maintenance event performed prior to a failure in order to prevent its occurrence. 3.3.3 The PETMAN system shall meet the anthropometric requirements of the 50th percentile male IAW DOD-HDBK-743A, Military Handbook Anthropometry of U.S. Military Personnel, 13 February 1991.

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 APPENDIX B 3.3.4 The PETMAN system shall simulate the following environmental/ physiological conditions under the individual protection ensemble. 3.3.4.1 The PETMAN system shall simulate fixed skin temperature by body region (T) and more realistic variability in body surface temperature based on body region and the level of physical activity/exertion (O). 3.3.4.2 The PETMAN system shall simulate a fixed perspiration rate of 0.4 L/hr (T) and more realistic variability in perspiration rates (range 0.11 to 1.8 L/hr) based on the level of physical activity/exertion (O). 3.3.4.3 The PETMAN system shall simulate a respiration rate of 50 L/min (fixed tidal volume of 1.5 L & breath frequency of 33 breaths/min) (T) and more realistic variability in respiration rates (range 10 to 115 L/min with variable tidal volumes and breath frequencies) based on the level of physical activity/exertion (O). 3.3.5 The PETMAN system shall be compatible with current under-ensemble chemical breakthrough sampling technologies, procedures, and equipment as defined in Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 10-2-022, Chemical Vapor and Aerosol System-Level Testing of Chemical/Biological Protective Suits (T) and designed to enable integration with real-time (1 second increments) sampling technologies, procedures, and equipment (O). At a minimum, sampling locations shall be the same as those defined in TOP 10-2-022. 3.3.6 The PETMAN system operation shall not be affected by the following chamber environmental conditions. 3.3.6.1 Temperature: 90°F ± 2°F (T); –25°F to 125°F ± 1°F, measured every 5 minutes (O) 3.3.6.2 Relative Humidity: 80% ± 3% (T); 0-100% ± 1%, measured every 5 minutes (O) 3.3.6.3 Wind speed: 0-10 mph ± 10% (T); 0-161 mph ± 2 mph (O) 3.3.6.4 Pressure: 0.25 iwg chamber vacuum maintained ± 2% 3.3.6.5 Liquid and vapor chemical agents including: All nerve and vesicant agents, as well as the chemical simulants, triethylphosphate and methyl salicylate. 3.3.7 The PETMAN system shall be articulated and robotic such that it looks and moves like a human, to include aesthetics, its proportions, and how the joints respond to sudden movements. All movements shall simulate realistic human control. The following, 3.3.7.1-3.3.7.16, are the minimum degrees of freedom (DoF) and considerations to be made for the PETMAN

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 APPENDIX B system to mimic human control. Additional DoF or joints can be used such that the PETMAN system can mimic human control and don/doff individual protection equipment as defined in 3.3.9.1-3.3.9.10. 3.3.7.1 The upper body of the PETMAN system shall consist of a head, a neck, a torso, two shoulders, two upper arms, two elbows, two lower arms and two hands. 3.3.7.2 The head shall be able to both pan and tilt as required. 3.3.7.3 The neck shall provide a minimum of two DoF between the torso and the head. This will allow the head to look up and down and from side to side, or pitch and yaw. 3.3.7.4 The torso shall be the base component of the upper body. The basic shape of the torso shall be similar to a male human chest. The torso shall have a minimum of three DoF, being pitch, roll and yaw. The PETMAN system shall be enabled to bend over, tilt from side to side and swivel with respect to the frontal plane. 3.3.7.5 The shoulders shall be attached to the torso and will allow for a minimum of two DoF. 3.3.7.6 The upper arm shall be attached at the shoulder, and shall be designed such that it is able to move with a minimum of two DoF without restriction. 3.3.7.7 The elbow shall have a minimum of one DoF and shall provide an attachment between the upper and lower arms. 3.3.7.8 The lower arm shall extend from the elbow joint and shall have a hand mechanism at its distal end. 3.3.7.9 The wrist shall be able to move with a minimum of two DoF for wrist extension/flexion and abduction. 3.3.7.10 The hand shall be articulated to study the glove/coat interface (T) or to have an opposable thumb and four fingers (O). Each finger shall have a minimum of four DoF (O). The distal inter- phalangeal joint (DIP) and the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) shall each have one DoF (O). The metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint shall have a minimum of two DoF due to flexion and abduction (O). The opposable thumb shall have a minimum of three DoF (O). The thumb shall have one degree of freedom for the interphalangeal (IP) joint (O). The thumb MCP joint shall have a minimum of two DoF due to flexion and abduction (O). Additional (objective) thumb DoF shall be due to flexion and abduction (2 DoF) of the trapeziometacarpal (TM) joint (O). 3.3.7.11 The lower body shall consist of the waist, two hip joints, two

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 APPENDIX B upper legs, two knees, two lower legs, two ankles and two feet. 3.3.7.12 The hip joint shall allow the upper leg to move with a minimum of two DoF. 3.3.7.13 The knee shall move with a minimum of one DoF. 3.3.7.14 The ankle shall move with a minimum of two DoF. The ankle shall allow the foot to both pitch and roll. 3.3.7.15 The ball of the foot shall move with a minimum of one DoF providing toe roll motion while walking. 3.3.7.16 Actuation of joints shall be smooth and efficient to mimic human motion. PETMAN system movement shall be free of back-lash. 3.3.8 The PETMAN system shall be articulated and robotic such that it can simulate the exercises defined in 3.3.8.1-3.3.8.13. 3.3.8.1 Standing 3.3.8.2 Walking at 4.8 km/hr (3 mph) 3.3.8.3 Marching (12 in. high step) at 4.8 km/hr (3 mph) 3.3.8.4 Jumping Jacks: Start with feet together and hands at sides. Si- multaneously step left foot to the side causing feet to be shoulder width apart and bring hands together palm to palm over head. Simultaneously return left foot to starting position (feet together) and hands back to sides. Repeat the exercise with the right foot. (T) Start with feet together and hands at sides. Simultaneously bring hands together palm to palm over head while jumping and landing with feet shoulder width apart. Simultaneously jump bringing feet back together and hands back to sides. (O) 3.3.8.5 Sitting 3.3.8.6 Move from standing position to squatting position and return to standing position 3.3.8.7 Reaching arms in all directions 3.3.8.8 Move from standing to laying prone and return to standing 3.3.8.9 Kneeling on one knee 3.3.8.10 Kneeling on both knees 3.3.8.11 Low crawl: Lay prone. Keep body flat against the ground. With firing hand, grasp weapon sling at the upper sling--swivel. Let the front handguard rest on forearm (keeping the muzzle off the ground), and let the weapon butt drag on the ground. To move, push arms forward and pull firing side leg forward. Then pull with arms and push with leg. Continue this throughout the move. 3.3.8.12 High crawl: Keep body off the ground by resting on forearms

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 APPENDIX B and lower legs. Cradle weapon in arms and keep its muzzle off the ground. Keep knees well behind buttocks so body will stay low. To move, alternately advance right elbow and left knee, then left elbow and right knee. 3.3.8.13 Aiming weapon in various positions: standing, kneeling on one knee, laying prone (grip rifle, sight rifle, trigger pull associated with small arms) 3.3.9 The PETMAN system shall be compatible with the individual pro- tection and ancillary equipment listed in 3.3.9.1-3.3.9.11. The PETMAN system shall be designed such that the individual protection equipment can be properly donned IAW the respective technical manuals. 3.3.9.1 Suits 3.3.9.1.1 Joint Service Lightweight Suit Technology (JSLIST) Type II 3.3.9.1.2 JSLIST Type VII 3.3.9.1.3 All Purpose-Personal Protective Ensemble (AP-PPE) 3.3.9.1.4 Chemical Protective Undergarment (CPU) 3.3.9.2 Boots 3.3.9.2.1 Green Vinyl Overboot (GVO) / Black Vinyl Overboot (BVO) 3.3.9.2.2 Multipurpose Overboot (MULO) 3.3.9.3 Gloves 3.3.9.3.1 7, 14, and 25 mil butyl gloves 3.3.9.3.2 JSLIST Block 1 Gove Upgrade (JB1GU) and JB1GU-Flame Retardant (FR) 3.3.9.4 Masks 3.3.9.4.1 M40/42 Series Masks 3.3.9.4.2 M45 Mask 3.3.9.4.3 M48 Chemical-Biological Apache Aviator Mask 3.3.9.4.4 Aircrew Eye Respirator Protection (AERP) 3.3.9.4.5 AP-22P Respirator Assembly 3.3.9.5 Helmets 3.3.9.5.1 Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH) 3.3.9.5.2 Personal Armor System Ground Troops (PASGT) Helmet 3.3.9.5.3 Modular Integrated Communications Helmet (MICH) 3.3.9.5.4 Lightweight Helmet 3.3.9.6 Combat Boots

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 APPENDIX B 3.3.9.6.1 Lightweight Desert Combat Boot 3.3.9.6.2 Jungle Boot 3.3.9.6.3 Infantry Combat Boot 3.3.9.6.4 Temperate and Hot Weather Combat Boot 3.3.9.7 Ballistic Protection Vests 3.3.9.7.1 Spall Vest 3.3.9.7.2 Interceptor Vest 3.3.9.8 Pistol Holsters 3.3.9.9 All Services Battle Dress and Combat Uniform 3.3.9.10 All Services Physical Training Gear (T-shirt, running shorts, socks) 3.3.9.11 Skin Exposure Reduction Paste against Chemical Warfare Agents (SERPACWA) (O) 3.3.10 The PETMAN system shall be compatible with the following weap- ons systems. The PETMAN system must be able to hold/grip and aim the weapon IAW the field manual (FM) FM 3-22.9, Rifle Marksmanship Field Manual. 3.3.10.1 M4 Modular Weapon 3.3.10.2 M24 Sniper Rifle 3.3.10.3 M16A2 Rifle 5.56 MM 3.3.10.4 XM8 Lightweight Assault Rifle 3.3.11 The PETMAN system shall be capable of being decontaminated with no adverse effects on the operation of the system and such that there is no effect on the next iteration of test (T) or leaving negligible agent residual, as defined by 3X decontamination level in DA PAM 385-61, Toxic Chemical Agent Safety Standards, (O) on the PETMAN system. 3.3.12 The PETMAN system shall utilize as many common commercially available parts and/or components as possible. 3.3.13 The PETMAN system shall record the following system parameters over time: skin temperature, respiration rate, perspiration rate, and total mass (in nanograms) of chemical vapor that penetrates/permeates through the protective ensemble. The PETMAN system shall record the start and stop time of each motion in 1 second increments.

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 APPENDIX B 3.3.14 The PETMAN system shall be programmable to perform a series of exercises or motion. The PETMAN system shall track body position during all motions within 1-second increments.