Appendix C
Committee Biographic Information

Masayoshi Tomizuka (Chair) is the Cheryl and John Neerhout, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley and is a former program director for the Dynamic Systems and Control Program in the Civil and Mechanical Systems Division of the National Science Foundation. Dr. Tomizuka’s research covers control theory and its applications to various mechanical systems, adaptive control, computer-aided manufacturing, control systems and theory, digital control, dynamic systems, manufacturing, and mechanical vibrations. Dr. Tomizuka received his B.S. and M.S. from Keio University in Japan and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Hadi Abu-Akeel (NAE) is president of AMTENG Corp., an independent consulting firm in industrial manufacturing robots. Dr. Abu-Akeel recently retired from FANUC Robotics NA, Inc., an industrial robotics firm, where he was senior vice president and chief engineer. His main expertise includes optimization of robot design, including tradeoffs of performance, cost, manufacturability, application requirements, and user friendliness; use of robotic devices to overcome manufacturing productivity challenges and provide cost-effective manufacturing-process alternatives; development and application of microsensors for intelligent robots, robotic assist devices, autonomous robots, and remote presence; and risk assessment, safety, and safeguarding of robot applications. In 1997, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for contributions to design, control, and implementation of industrial robots. Dr. Abu-Akeel received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.



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Appendix C Committee Biographic Information Masayoshi Tomizuka (Chair) is the Cheryl and John Neerhout, Jr., Distin- guished Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Califor- nia, Berkeley and is a former program director for the Dynamic Systems and Control Program in the Civil and Mechanical Systems Division of the National Science Foundation. Dr. Tomizuka’s research covers control theory and its applications to various mechanical systems, adaptive control, computer-aided manufacturing, control systems and theory, digital control, dynamic systems, manufacturing, and mechanical vibrations. Dr. Tomizuka received his B.S. and M.S. from Keio University in Japan and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Hadi Abu-Akeel (NAE) is president of AMTENG Corp., an independent consulting firm in industrial manufacturing robots. Dr. Abu-Akeel recently retired from FANUC Robotics NA, Inc., an industrial robotics firm, where he was senior vice president and chief engineer. His main expertise includes optimization of robot design, including tradeoffs of performance, cost, manufacturability, application requirements, and user friendliness; use of robotic devices to overcome manufacturing productivity challenges and provide cost-effective manufacturing-process alternatives; development and application of microsensors for intelligent robots, robotic assist devices, autonomous robots, and remote presence; and risk assessment, safety, and safeguarding of robot applications. In 1997, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for contributions to design, control, and implementation of industrial robots. Dr. Abu-Akeel received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. 

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0 APPENDIX C Christopher g. Atkeson is a professor in the Robotics Institute and Human- Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). He received his M.S. in applied mathematics (computer science) from Harvard University and his Ph.D. in brain and cognitive science from the Massa- chusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He joined the MIT faculty in 1986, moved to the Georgia Institute of Technology College of Computing in 1994, and moved to CMU in 2000. Lisa M. brosseau is an associate professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota. She is an industrial hygienist whose primary interests are in controlling infectious aerosols and assisting small businesses with workplace health and safety. Dr. Brosseau received her master’s degree and doctorate in industrial hygiene from the Harvard School of Public Health. Her current research focuses on testing the effectiveness of health and safety interventions in small metalworking shops and developing and testing the effectiveness of health and safety newsletters in small manufac- turing businesses. Dr. Brosseau is deputy director of the Midwest Center for Occupational Safety and Health, which is supported by a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health training grant. She teaches courses in applications of industrial hygiene and management of hazardous materials and waste. Zane Frund is the manager of chemical research and materials engineering at Mine Safety Appliances (MSA, Inc.), where he is responsible for the de- velopment and evaluation of designs and compounds used in a wide array of occupational health and safety equipment applications (for example, air-purifying respirators, body armor, firefighter self-contained breathing apparatus, thermal imaging cameras, and solid oxygen-containing self-res- cuers). Dr. Frund developed a curriculum and gave college and university courses associated with occupational health and respiratory protection, ma- terials science and engineering, forensic science, and forensic chemistry. He has also served as a peer reviewer of technical reports and manuscripts for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, and the Journal of the Interna- tional Society for Respiratory Protection. He received his Ph.D. in materials engineering with a minor in occupational and environmental health from the University of Pittsburgh. Darrell L. Jan is the project manager for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Advanced Environmental Monitoring and Control (AEMC) program element in the Exploration Systems Technology Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a federally funded esearch and development center staffed and managed by the California Institute of Technology. In

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 APPENDIX C this role, Dr. Jan is responsible for developing chemical-sensing systems for future human space flight. As manager of AEMC, he has overseen research projects that have included miniature mass spectrometry, an electronic nose array, development of mid-infrared tunable diode lasers for trace-gas measurement, polymer chair reaction and and adenosine tri-phosphate analysis of space-station water, detection of trace gases via fluorescence resonance energy transfer using dendritic molecules, bioluminescent biore- porter chips, and microfluidic ion chromatography. Dr. Jan has received a NASA Quality and Productivity Award for propulsion system filter analysis. He is a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Dr. Jan earned his B.S. in bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley and his S.M. and Ph.D. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Sundaresan Jayaraman is a professor of polymer, textile, and fiber engineer- ing with a joint appointment in the College of Management at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia. He and his research students have made substantial contributions in enterprise architecture and model- ing methods for information systems, engineering design of intelligent tex- tile structures and processes, design and development of knowledge-based systems for textiles and apparel, and multimedia educational systems. His group’s research has led to the realization of the world’s first Wearable Motherboard™, also known as the Smart Shirt. He received his BTech and MTech in textile engineering from the University of Madras, India, and his Ph.D. in textile engineering from North Carolina State University. Leo kobayashi is the director of adult simulations at the Rhode Island Hospital Medical Simulation Center. He graduated from Brown Medical School and completed his emergency-medicine residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Massachusetts General Hospital in 2002. Dr. Kobayashi is an active educator in Brown Medical School and its postgraduate training program in emergency medicine. His research focuses on advanced medical simulation, its validation as an educational method, and its application to disaster-medicine education and training. He has substantial experience in medical simulation in teaching duties at Harvard Medical School and at the Rhode Island Medical Simulation Center. He has helped in developing the concept of multiple patient simulations for emergency care and disaster response. Dava J. Newman is a professor of aeronautics and astronautics and en- gineering systems and director of the Technology and Policy Program at

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 APPENDIX C the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Her multidisciplinary research effort combines aerospace bioengineering, human-in-the-loop dy- namics and control modeling, biomechanics, human interface technology, life sciences, and systems analysis and design. The research studies are car- ried out through flight experiments, ground-based simulations, and math- ematical and computer modeling. Other research efforts include advanced space-suit design and navigation aids for extravehicular-activity astronauts. Dr. Newman earned her B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Notre Dame in 1986, dual M.S. degrees from MIT in 1989 in aeronau- tics and astronautics and technology and policy, and a Ph.D. from MIT in aerospace biomedical engineering. Arthur C. Sanderson is professor of electrical, computer, and systems engi- neering, and vice president of research at Rensselaer Polytechnic University. After completing a postdoctorate at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) in The Netherlands, Dr. Sanderson held faculty positions at CMU from 1973 to 1987, where he was codirector of the Robotics Institute. He also held visiting positions at Delft University of Technology; Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City; Philips Laboratories, Briarcliff Manor, NY; and the University of Tsukuba, Japan. In 1987, he joined Rensselaer Poly- technic Institute as a professor and served as head of the Electrical, Com- puter and Systems Engineering Department. During 1998-1999, he served as director of the Division of Electrical and Communications Systems at the National Science Foundation in Washington, D.C. From 2000 through July 2004, Dr. Sanderson served as vice president for research of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and was responsible for development and coordination of research programs on the campus. He received his B.S. from Brown Uni- versity and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). R. Paul Schaudies is chief executive officer of GenArraytion. Inc. GenArraytion is a veteran-owned biotechnology company that uses cut- ting-edge molecular-biology and bioinformatic techniques to identify and characterize pathogenic organisms. Previously, he was the assistant vice president and division manager at Science Applications International Cor- poration. His division focused on three major business areas: contract biomedical research, technology assessments, and scientific studies. He was key in establishing the levels for reentry into the Hart Senate Build- ing (after it was contaminated with anthrax in 2001) and is a nationally recognized expert in biologic- and chemical-warfare defense. Dr. Schaudies served on numerous national advisory panels for the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the Department of Energy. He has 14 years of bench research experience in managing laboratories at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and as a

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 APPENDIX C visiting scientist at the National Cancer Institute. He served for 13 years on active duty with the Army Medical Service Corps and retired from the U.S. Army Reserves as a lieutenant colonel. He spent 4 years with DIA as collec- tions manager for biologic and chemical defense technologies; he initiated numerous intra-agency collaborations that resulted in accelerated product development in biologic-warfare agent detection and identification. Dr. Schaudies has served on many National Research Council committees, in- cluding the Committee to Review the National Nanotechnology Initiative.

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