B
Committee Member Biographies

David R. Franz (co-chair) is chief biological scientist at the Midwest Research Institute and director of the National Agricultural Biosecurity Center at Kansas State University. He served in the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command for 23 of his 27 years on active duty. Dr. Franz has served as deputy commander and commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) and as deputy commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. Before joining the command, he served as group veterinarian for the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Dr. Franz was technical editor of the Textbook of Military Medicine on Chemical and Biological Defense and has been an invited speaker at many nationally and internationally recognized organizations. He served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Biological Threats to Agricultural Plants and Animals. He is serving on the NRC Committee on Genomics Databases for Bioterrorism Threat Agents and on the Committee to Review Research Proposals from Former Soviet Biological Weapons Institutes, which he chairs. Dr. Franz holds a DVM from Kansas State University and a Ph.D. in physiology from Baylor College of Medicine.


Norman L. Johnson (co-chair) is chief scientist at Referentia Systems, a small, minority-owned business that develops advanced technology solutions to complex problems in the areas of defense and homeland security. He received his B.S. from the University of California, Davis and his Ph.D. from University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Johnson is on leave of absence from Los Alamos National Laboratory where he served for 25 years, most recently as Deputy Group Leader of the Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group in the Theoretical Division.



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Protecting Building Occupants and Operations from Biological and Chemical Airborne Threats: A Framework for Decision Making B Committee Member Biographies David R. Franz (co-chair) is chief biological scientist at the Midwest Research Institute and director of the National Agricultural Biosecurity Center at Kansas State University. He served in the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command for 23 of his 27 years on active duty. Dr. Franz has served as deputy commander and commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) and as deputy commander of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. Before joining the command, he served as group veterinarian for the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Dr. Franz was technical editor of the Textbook of Military Medicine on Chemical and Biological Defense and has been an invited speaker at many nationally and internationally recognized organizations. He served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Biological Threats to Agricultural Plants and Animals. He is serving on the NRC Committee on Genomics Databases for Bioterrorism Threat Agents and on the Committee to Review Research Proposals from Former Soviet Biological Weapons Institutes, which he chairs. Dr. Franz holds a DVM from Kansas State University and a Ph.D. in physiology from Baylor College of Medicine. Norman L. Johnson (co-chair) is chief scientist at Referentia Systems, a small, minority-owned business that develops advanced technology solutions to complex problems in the areas of defense and homeland security. He received his B.S. from the University of California, Davis and his Ph.D. from University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Johnson is on leave of absence from Los Alamos National Laboratory where he served for 25 years, most recently as Deputy Group Leader of the Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group in the Theoretical Division.

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Protecting Building Occupants and Operations from Biological and Chemical Airborne Threats: A Framework for Decision Making Before this, he was deputy program manager for three years for the Biological Threat Reduction Program Office, under Dr. I. Gary Resnick, and guided the development and execution of a $40 million program in all areas of biothreats, from genomics to sensor systems to system modeling to operations. As a project manger, he oversaw projects that were challenging and often considered to be in the “too hard to do” box. The key to success was enabling diverse teams to break limiting barriers and discover synergistic advantages of diverse contributions. His published research covers multiphase flows, inertially confined fusion, combustion modeling, self-organizing knowledge creation, diversity in collective systems, and developmental theories of evolution. His current areas of interest are biodefense, epidemiology—particularly pandemic influenza, and modeling the dynamics of social collectives and social identity. William P. Bahnfleth is professor of architectural engineering and the founding director of the Indoor Environment Center (IEC) at the Pennsylvania State University. He has nearly 25 years of experience as a design engineer, researcher, and educator in the building mechanical systems field. He teaches and conducts research on systems for controlling indoor air quality and efficient utilization of energy in building heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current areas of investigation include thermal energy storage, ultraviolet germicidal irradiation for the control of bioaerosols, demand-controlled ventilation, and design of HVAC systems to mitigate the effects of chemical and biological releases. As a consultant, he has assisted in the design of more than a dozen thermal storage systems in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Saudi Arabia. Dr. Bahnfleth served on the NRC Committee on Safe Buildings Program. Cynthia Bruckner-Lea currently manages the Chemical and Biological Sciences Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), which is focused on chemical and biological detection and forensics research and development. She received a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Davis, and a Ph.D. in bioengineering from the University of Utah. Dr. Bruckner-Lea has developed several bioanalytical research programs for environmental monitoring and medical applications. For example, she led interdisciplinary research teams in developing automated pathogen detection systems based on nucleic acid analysis using planar microarrays and bead suspension arrays, a project team focused on the development of nanoparticle labels and methods for rapid antibody-based pathogen detection, and a multilaboratory team developing a broad-spectrum point biodetection system. She served as the chair of the Sensor Division of the Electrochemical Society from 2002 to 2004. She often organizes symposia and is an invited speaker at many sensor symposia. Dr. Bruckner-Lea served on the NRC Committee on Materials and Manufacturing Processes for Advanced Sensors. Steven B. Buchsbaum is currently a senior program officer in the Global Health Technologies program at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. His areas of focus

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Protecting Building Occupants and Operations from Biological and Chemical Airborne Threats: A Framework for Decision Making at the foundation include statistical and modeling issues, vaccine delivery technologies, diagnostic platform technologies, technologies for etiological surveillance, and tuberculosis vaccine and drug discovery. Prior to this position, he was a program manager for both the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency and had direct contact with the DARPA Immune Building Program. He is an engineer by training with a strong background in sensing and detection as well. Dr. Buchsbaum received an M.S. and Ph.D. in physics, as well as his MP.I.A. in international technology management, from the University of California, San Diego. He earned his B.A. from Hamilton College in New York. Sheldon K. Friedlander (deceased) was a Parsons Professor of Chemical Engineering and director of the Nanoparticle Technology/Air Quality Engineering Lab at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research group works on aerosol engineering and the science and technology of fine particles in gases, with applications to air pollution and advanced materials. The synthesis of fine particles in narrow size ranges with controlled crystalline properties is an emerging technology with important industrial applications. Such particles when formed under uncontrolled conditions and emitted to the atmosphere may pose a threat to public health. His students have become familiar with (and taken jobs in) both the air pollution and the advanced materials fields of application. Dr. Friedlander was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1975 and served on different NRC committees. Murray Hamlet is a retired chief of the Research Support Division in the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) in Natick, Massachusetts. Prior to that, he served as director of the Cold Research Division, USARIEM, from 1972 to 1989. Long interested in threat, vulnerability, and forensics, Dr. Hamlet has conducted threat analyses of buildings in greater Boston against biological, chemical, and explosive threats. He inspects the HVAC systems; power and communications inputs; the gas, water, and sewage systems; the delivery and waste disposal procedures; and the surrounding streets and buildings. He also documents vulnerable points and practices, and offers solutions to increase building protection. Dr. Hamlet holds a DVM from Washington State University. He also holds veterinary licenses in Alaska, California, Massachusetts, Oregon, and Washington, as well as appointments at Tufts University, the Arctic Medical Research Laboratory, and as the sole civilian representative on an expert panel directed by the Secretary of the Army to review programs for high intensity training safety. Stuart L. Knoop is co-founder of Oudens Knoop Knoop + Sachs Architects of Chevy Chase, Maryland. He has been involved in design for physical security for more than 30 years, particularly for the U.S. State Department, Overseas Building Operations, General Services Administration, National Institutes of Health,

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Protecting Building Occupants and Operations from Biological and Chemical Airborne Threats: A Framework for Decision Making Department of Veterans Affairs, and Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He has served on many NRC committees, including the Committee on Research for the Security of Future U.S. Embassy Buildings and the Committee for Oversight and Assessment of Blast-Effects and Related Research. He also served as vice chair of the Committee on Feasibility of Applying Blast-Mitigating Technologies and Design Methodologies from Military Facilities to Civilian Buildings and as chair of the Committee to Review the Security Design Criteria of the Interagency Security Committee. He is also a former member of the NRC Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems. Mr. Knoop is a registered architect, a fellow of the American Institute of Architects, and a member of the American Society for Industrial Security and the Construction Specifications Institute. He holds a B.Arch. from Carnegie Institute of Technology (Carnegie Mellon University) and was a Fulbright scholar to the Architectural Association in London, England. Andrew Maier is the associate director for the nonprofit group Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment (TERA) and former manager of TERA’s chemical risk assessment (VERA) program. He has led efforts at TERA in the area of occupational toxicology. While at TERA, he has coauthored technical reports, human health risk assessment documents, and toxicity summaries for environmental, consumer, occupational, or emergency exposure scenarios covering more than 100 individual substances. Development of these documents included critical review and analysis of animal toxicity, epidemiology, and mechanistic studies, with integration of this information for the derivation of human health risk values, including assessment of hazard and risk from all routes of exposure. Dr. Maier is active in risk assessment methodology research and has published in the areas of biomarkers, use of genetic polymorphism data in risk assessments, and methods in occupational toxicology. In addition to his Ph.D. (University of Cincinnati) and board certification in toxicology, Dr. Maier holds an M.S. in industrial hygiene (University of Michigan) and has been certified in comprehensive industrial hygiene practice since 1994. He has practical technical experience in occupational hygiene as a former industrial hygienist in private industry where he managed all aspects of a comprehensive industrial program, including hazard evaluation and control. In this capacity, he gained experience in evaluating exposure control methodologies for diverse industrial, research, and office facilities. He is an officer of the American Industrial Hygiene Association’s Workplace Environmental Exposure Levels Committee and a member of the Society of Toxicology Occupational Health Specialty Section. R. Paul Schaudies is the chief executive officer of GenArraytion, Inc., a small veteran-owned business that develops DNA- and RNA- based methods for identification and characterization of biological organisms. Before that, he was the assistant vice president and division manager at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). He was key in establishing the levels for reentry into the

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Protecting Building Occupants and Operations from Biological and Chemical Airborne Threats: A Framework for Decision Making Hart Building and is a nationally recognized expert in the fields of biological and chemical warfare defense. He has served on numerous national-level advisory panels for the Defense Intelligence Agency, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and Department of Energy. He has 14 years of bench research experience managing laboratories at Walter Reed, the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and as a visiting scientist at the National Cancer Institute. He spent four years with the Defense Intelligence Agency as collections manager for biological and chemical defense technologies. As such, he initiated numerous intra-agency collaborations that resulted in accelerated product development in the area of biological warfare agent detection and identification. He served for 13 years on active duty with the Army Medical Service Corps and is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve. Dr. Schaudies has served on many NRC committees, including the Committee to Review the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Richard G. Sextro is director of the Indoor Environment Department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He received his B.S. from Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Sextro has been actively involved in research concerning biological and chemical warfare agents in indoor environments. He has recently completed a modeling study on indoor dispersion patterns of anthrax spores. Dr. Sextro served on the NRC Committee on Safe Buildings Program and Committee on Risk Assessment of Exposure to Radon in Drinking Water. Linda D. Stetzenbach is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health and graduate coordinator in the School of Public Health at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Arizona. Her research interests are in the characterization of airborne and surface-associated microorganisms in indoor environments that affect human health; enhanced detection methodologies for identification and enumeration of microorganisms in environmental samples; fate and transport of airborne microorganisms (bioaersols). Dr. Stetzenbach served as an editor for the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology from 2001 to 2004. She is serving on the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Special Project Committee (SPC 180P—Standard Practice for Inspection and Maintenance for HVAC Systems). Linda M. Thomas-Mobley is an assistant professor in the College of Architecture’s Building Construction Program at Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Thomas-Mobley has a Ph.D. from Georgia Institute of Technology; a J.D. from the University of Miami; and an M.S. and a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Florida.

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Protecting Building Occupants and Operations from Biological and Chemical Airborne Threats: A Framework for Decision Making David R. Walt is the Robinson Professor of Chemistry at Tufts University and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor. He is also the founding scientist, director, and chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board of Illumina, Inc. He received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan and Ph.D. in chemical biology from the State University of New York, Stony Brook. His laboratory is world renowned for its pioneering work that applies micro- and nanotechnology to urgent biological problems, such as the analysis of genetic variation and the behavior of single cells, as well as the practical application of arrays to the detection of explosives, chemical warfare agents, air contaminants, and food and waterborne pathogens. Dr. Walt received the National Science Foundation Special Creativity Award in 1995 and the 3M Research Creativity Award in 1989. He has served on a number of NRC committees, including the Committee on Review of Testing and Evaluation Methodology for Biological Point Detectors.