Appendix B
Biographic Information on the Committee on Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites

Charles O'Melia (Chair) is the Abel Wolman Professor of Environmental Engineering and chair of the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, where he has served on the faculty for over 25 years. Dr. O'Melia's research fields include aquatic chemistry, environmental colloid chemistry, water and wastewater treatment, modeling of natural surface and subsurface waters, and the behavior of colloidal particles. He has served on the advisory board and review committees for the environmental engineering departments of multiple universities. He has advised professional societies, including the American Water Works Association and Research Foundation, the Water Pollution Control Federation, the American Chemical Society, and the International Water Supply Association. He served the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a peer-review panel member and on the Science Advisory Board. Dr. O'Melia has consulted for a variety of municipal, industrial, and government clients. In addition, he has served on several National Research Council committees, including chairing the Steering Committee for the Symposium on Science and Regulation and the Committee on Watershed Management for New York City. He was also a member of the National Research Council Water Science and



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Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites: Assessing the Effectiveness Appendix B Biographic Information on the Committee on Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites Charles O'Melia (Chair) is the Abel Wolman Professor of Environmental Engineering and chair of the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, where he has served on the faculty for over 25 years. Dr. O'Melia's research fields include aquatic chemistry, environmental colloid chemistry, water and wastewater treatment, modeling of natural surface and subsurface waters, and the behavior of colloidal particles. He has served on the advisory board and review committees for the environmental engineering departments of multiple universities. He has advised professional societies, including the American Water Works Association and Research Foundation, the Water Pollution Control Federation, the American Chemical Society, and the International Water Supply Association. He served the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a peer-review panel member and on the Science Advisory Board. Dr. O'Melia has consulted for a variety of municipal, industrial, and government clients. In addition, he has served on several National Research Council committees, including chairing the Steering Committee for the Symposium on Science and Regulation and the Committee on Watershed Management for New York City. He was also a member of the National Research Council Water Science and

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Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites: Assessing the Effectiveness Technology Board and Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. O'Melia earned a PhD in sanitary engineering from the University of Michigan. In 1989, Dr. O'Melia was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for significant contributions to the theories of coagulation, flocculation, and filtration leading to improved water-treatment practices throughout the world. G. Allen Burton is a professor of environmental sciences and director of the Institute for Environmental Quality at Wright State University. He has served as a NATO senior research fellow in Portugal and a visiting senior scientist in Italy and New Zealand. He was the Brage Golding Distinguished Professor of Research at Wright State University. Dr. Burton's research during the last 25 years has focused on developing effective methods for identifying ecologic effects and stressors in aquatic systems where sediment and storm-water contamination is a concern. His ecosystem risk assessments have evaluated multiple levels of biologic organization, from microbial to amphibian effects. Dr. Burton serves on numerous national and international scientific committees, review panels, councils, and editorial boards, and he consults for industry and regulatory agencies. He earned his PhD in environmental science (aquatic toxicology) from the University of Texas at Dallas. William Clements is a professor at Colorado State University, where he has served on the faculty since 1989. Dr. Clements’s primary research interests are in basic aquatic ecology and ecotoxicology. His research has focused on understanding how benthic macroinvertebrate communities respond to natural and anthropogenic stressors. More recently, his research projects have included assessments of recovery from fire disturbance, quantifying interactions between natural and anthropogenic stressors, and measuring abiotic factors that influence contaminant bioavailability. Dr. Clements has a substantial record of publication on benthic invertebrates, benthic community interactions, and effects of stressors. He is the author of several book chapters and a coauthor of the book Community Ecotoxicology, published in 2002. Dr. Clements earned his PhD in zoology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1988.

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Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites: Assessing the Effectiveness Frank C. Curriero in an assistant professor in the Departments of Environmental Health Sciences and Biostatistics at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University. His research expertise and interests include applications of spatial statistics and geographic information systems for environmental public health. Dr. Curriero’s research has spanned applications involving environmental epidemiology, disease mapping, spatial variation in risk and exposure assessment models, and geostatistical methods. His current methodologic research includes statistical methods for censored spatial data and models for non-Euclidean isotropic spatial dependence in geostatistics. Dr. Curriero earned his PhD in statistics from Kansas State University. Dominic Di Toro is the Edward C. Davis Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Delaware and is a consultant for HydroQual, Inc. Dr. Di Toro has specialized in the development and application of mathematical and statistical models to stream, lake, estuarine, and coastal water-quality and sediment-quality problems. He has participated as an expert consultant, principal investigator, and project manager on numerous water- quality studies for industry, research foundations, and government agencies. Recently, his work has focused on the development of water-quality and sediment-quality criteria, sediment-flux models for nutrients and metals, and integrated hydrodynamic, sediment-transport, and water-quality models. Dr. Di Toro received his PhD in civil and geological engineering from Princeton University. In 2005, Dr. Di Toro was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for leadership in the development and application of mathematical models for establishing water-quality criteria and making management decisions. Norman Francingues retired from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 2002 with over 30 years of federal civil service. He is the recipient of the Army Engineer Association Bronze Order of the de Fluery Medal and the Army Meritorious Civilian Service Award from the chief of engineers. He is a senior consultant with OA Systems Corporation. Mr. Francingues worked for the Army Corps as a senior technical adviser and for other national and international agencies on the environmental engineering aspects of navigation and hazardous-waste projects. He was

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Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites: Assessing the Effectiveness technical lead for the development of innovative dredging technologies for the Army Corps of Engineers Dredging Operations and Environmental Research (DOER) program. He advises on contaminated dredged material for the International Navigation Association (PIANC), headquartered in Brussels, Belgium. His research involves innovative dredging technologies, fluidized-sediment evaluations, confined placement of contaminated dredged material, and treatment of contaminated sediments and soils. Mr. Francingues earned an MS in environmental engineering from Mississippi State University. Richard Luthy is the Silas H. Palmer Professor and chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. His research interests include environmental engineering and water quality, particularly phase partitioning and the treatment and fate of hydrophobic organic compounds. His research emphasizes interdisciplinary approaches to the behavior and availability of organic contaminants and the application of these approaches to bioavailability and environmental-quality criteria and sediment restoration. He chaired the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board and its Committee on Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soils and Sediments. He is a past president of the Association of Environmental Engineering Professors. He is a registered professional engineer and a Diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. He received his PhD in environmental engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Luthy was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 1999 for leadership in the treatment of industrial wastewaters, contaminated soils, and aquifers. Perry L. McCarty is the Silas H. Palmer Professor Emeritus in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. He directed the Western Region Hazardous Substance Research Center from 1989 to 2002. Dr. McCarty specializes in environmental engineering with emphasis on biologic processes for water-quality control and the control of hazardous substances in treatment systems and groundwater. His research interests over the last 45 years have been in biologic processes for the control of environmental contaminants. His early research was on anaerobic treatment processes, biologic processes for nitrogen removal, and biologic degradation of hazardous chemicals.

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Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites: Assessing the Effectiveness His current interests are in aerobic and anaerobic biologic processes for control of chlorinated solvents, advanced wastewater-treatment processes, and movement, fate, and control of groundwater contaminants. Dr. McCarty earned his ScD in sanitary engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1977 for contributions to the environmental engineering profession through education, research, and service to government and industry. Nancy Musgrove is the president of Management of Environmental Resources, Inc. Ms. Musgrove is experienced as an aquatic ecologist; working with both regulators and the regulated community, she has expertise in assessment of risks to aquatic communities, water-quality and sediment- quality investigations, and design of environmental monitoring programs and laboratory and field studies. She has been involved in numerous regional and national sediment investigation and cleanup projects and the peer review of decisions made at contaminated-sediment sites. Ms. Musgrove has substantial experience with the regulatory framework and technical protocols governing environmental-management decisions throughout the United States and Canada. She earned an M.S. in fisheries from the University of Washington. Katherine N. Probst is a senior fellow at Resources for the Future. Over the last 25 years, she has conducted numerous analyses of environmental programs, focusing mainly on improving the implementation of Superfund and other hazardous-waste management programs. She was the lead author of the study Superfund's Future: What Will it Cost?, requested by Congress, on the estimated cost of the Superfund program to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Her most recent study, Success for Superfund, includes recommendations for specific information that EPA should make available to the public on all Superfund sites in a site “report card.” Ms. Probst also has investigated issues related to the use of institutional controls at contaminated sites, long-term stewardship, and the cleanup of sites in the nuclear-weapons complex. She was a member of EPA's Superfund National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology Subcommittee and of the EPA Science Advisory Board committee that reviewed analyses of the benefits of the

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Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites: Assessing the Effectiveness Superfund program. Ms. Probst received an MA in city and regional planning from Harvard University. Danny Reible joined the faculty of the University of Texas at Austin College of Engineering in 2004; he holds the Bettie Margaret Smith Chair of Environmental Health Engineering. He is also director of the Hazardous Substance Research Center/South and Southwest, a consortium of Louisiana State University, Rice University, Texas A&M University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Reible leads both fundamental and applied efforts in the assessment and management of risks associated with hazardous substances, especially as they apply to contaminated sediments. Dr. Reible has led the development of in situ sediment capping, and he has evaluated the applicability of capping technology to a wide array of contaminants and settings, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from fuels, manufactured-gas plants, and creosote- manufacturing facilities; polychlorinated biphenyls; and metals. He has consulted for both industry and regulatory groups on the applicability and design of capping for remediation at a variety of specific sites. His research has also focused on the natural attenuation of contaminants as a result of various processes in the environment. He received his PhD in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Reible was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 2005 for the development of widely used methods of managing contaminated sediments. Louis J. Thibodeaux is the Jesse Coates Professor at the Louisiana State University College of Engineering. Dr. Thibodeaux’s experience and expertise are in chemical-transport processes at and across the natural media (air, water, soil, and sediments) interfaces. Specific applications have included chemical movement associated with landfill disposal, treatment, and storage of aqueous waste. He has conducted environmental research projects on chemical spills in rivers, volatiles from wastewater, nutrient cycling/modeling in lakes, and hazardous substances in contaminated bed sediment in natural aquatic systems. His current research efforts address three key aspects of the remediation chemodynamics of bed-sediment contamination: the natural recovery processes of in situ bed-sediment in the aquatic environment of rivers, lakes, and estuaries; the processes occurring with the surface soils formed from extracted (ex

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Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites: Assessing the Effectiveness situ) dredged material; and the chemodynamics associated with mud clouds produced during dredging. Dr. Thibodeaux has served the National Research Council as cochair of the Steering Committee for the National Symposium on Strategies and Technologies for Cleaning up Contaminated Sediments in the Nation's Harbors and Waterways, the Committee on Risk-Based Criteria for Non-RCRA Hazardous Waste, the Committee on Contaminated Marine Sediments, and the Committee on Remedial Action Priorities for Hazardous Waste Sites. Dr. Thibodeaux earned his PhD in chemical engineering from Louisiana State University. Donna J. Vorhees is a principal scientist with the Science Collaborative, where she provides human health risk-assessment consulting services for a variety of municipal, federal, and industrial clients. She is also an instructor at the Boston University School of Public Health, where she teaches a course in risk- assessment methods. She has extensive experience in addressing environmental questions arising from multipathway human exposure to chemicals that have been released to indoor and outdoor environments at federal and state hazardous-waste sites. Her research interests include development of probabilistic human-exposure models; field surveys to collect data needed to support risk assessment, such as samples of biota consumed by humans and interviews with anglers regarding fish-consumption practices; identification of research priorities for improving dredged-material management; and preparation of environmental-health educational materials. Dr. Vorhees conducted probabilistic analyses of multipathway exposure to PCBs in residences near the New Bedford Harbor, MA, Superfund site, to PCBs and pesticides that accumulate in fish from an offshore dredged-material disposal site, and to PCBs, dioxins, and furans that accumulate in agricultural products from the floodplain of a contaminated river. She is an active member of the Society for Risk Analysis and the International Society of Exposure Analysis. Dr. Vorhees earned her master’s degree and doctorate in environmental health from the Harvard School of Public Health. John R. Wolfe is a senior manager at Limno-Tech, Inc. He has expertise in fate and transport modeling of contaminants and environmental economics, and he manages projects in contaminated sediment, wastewater treatment and discharge permitting, combined sewer-overflow control, and groundwater protection for a variety of municipal, state, federal, and

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Sediment Dredging at Superfund Megasites: Assessing the Effectiveness industrial clients. Dr. Wolfe holds an MSE from the University of Michigan, where has an adjunct teaching appointment in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He also holds a PhD in economics from the University of Pennsylvania and was associate professor of economics at Michigan State University. He is a licensed professional engineer and a member of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers.