Appendix A
Biographical Information on the Committee on Models in the Regulatory Decision Process

Chris G. Whipple is a principal in ENVIRON International Corporation in Emeryville, California, which provides consulting services mainly to private industry. His professional interests are in risk assessment, and he often works on environmental and health issues involving radioactive materials or mercury. He is currently a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (BEST) and chairs the BEST work group on Environmental Sciences and Engineering. He also currently chairs the Committee on Medical Isotope Production Without Highly Enriched Uranium. He previously served as chair of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management (BRWM). He has served on and chaired numerous other NRC committees. Dr. Whipple received his B.S. in engineering science from Purdue University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in engineering science from the California Institute of Technology.


M. Bruce Beck is Wheatley-Georgia Research Alliance professor of environmental systems analysis at the University of Georgia. His research interests include modeling and simulation of surface-water quality; control and automation of wastewater treatment processes; and novel systems for urban wastewater infrastructures. Before his appointment at the University of Georgia, he was a visiting research fellow at the Lund Institute of Technology, Sweden; a Royal Society Ernest Cook Trust research fellow at Cambridge University in England; a research scholar at



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Models in Environmental Regulatory Decision Making Appendix A Biographical Information on the Committee on Models in the Regulatory Decision Process Chris G. Whipple is a principal in ENVIRON International Corporation in Emeryville, California, which provides consulting services mainly to private industry. His professional interests are in risk assessment, and he often works on environmental and health issues involving radioactive materials or mercury. He is currently a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (BEST) and chairs the BEST work group on Environmental Sciences and Engineering. He also currently chairs the Committee on Medical Isotope Production Without Highly Enriched Uranium. He previously served as chair of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management (BRWM). He has served on and chaired numerous other NRC committees. Dr. Whipple received his B.S. in engineering science from Purdue University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in engineering science from the California Institute of Technology. M. Bruce Beck is Wheatley-Georgia Research Alliance professor of environmental systems analysis at the University of Georgia. His research interests include modeling and simulation of surface-water quality; control and automation of wastewater treatment processes; and novel systems for urban wastewater infrastructures. Before his appointment at the University of Georgia, he was a visiting research fellow at the Lund Institute of Technology, Sweden; a Royal Society Ernest Cook Trust research fellow at Cambridge University in England; a research scholar at

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Models in Environmental Regulatory Decision Making the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Austria; and a member of faculty at Imperial College, London, where he is visiting professor. Dr. Beck received his B.Sc. in chemical engineering from the University of Exeter and his Ph.D. in control engineering from the University of Cambridge. Clayton J. Clark II is an assistant professor of civil and coastal engineering at the University of Florida. His research interests include implementing waste management procedures; delineating and remediation of contaminated hazardous waste sites; and combining chemical and environmental engineering techniques for hazardous waste handling, disposal, and treatment from both soil and aqueous systems. Dr. Clark is also associated with the Florida Center for Solid and Hazardous Waste Management through his work on the modeling of the fate and transport of contaminants from pressure-treated wood. Dr. Clark received his B.S. from Florida A&M University and his Ph.D. from the University of Florida. Robert T. Clemen is an associate professor of decision sciences at the Fuqua School of Business, Duke University. Before going to Duke, Dr. Clemen was associate professor at the University of Oregon and senior researcher at Decision Research in Eugene, Oregon. His teaching and research interests focus on decision analysis, especially the use of models and expert judgment for decision making. He received his B.A. from Stanford University, M.B.A. from the University of Colorado, and Ph.D. from Indiana University. Judith A. Graham is the managing director of the American Chemistry Council’s (ACC) long-range research initiative (LRI). The LRI sponsors research to advance the science of risk assessment for the health impacts of chemicals to support decision making by government, industry, and the public. Her research interests include inhalation toxicology, exposure analysis, and health effects and health risks of air pollutants. Before joining ACC, Dr. Graham was associate director for health at EPA’s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). She has served on several previous National Research Council study committees. Dr. Graham received her Ph.D. in physiology and pharmacology from Duke University. Louis J. Gross is the director of the Institute for Environmental Modeling, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, and a professor of

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Models in Environmental Regulatory Decision Making mathematics at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. His research interests include mathematical ecology, computational ecology, quantitative training for life science students, photosynthetic dynamics, and parallel computation for ecological models. He is currently president of the Society for Mathematical Biology and recently chaired the NRC Committee on Integrating Education and Biocomplexity Research. He received his B.S. degree from Drexel University and his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Cornell University. Winston Harrington is a senior fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF). His research interests include urban transportation, motor vehicles and air quality, and estimating the costs of environmental policies. He has worked on the economics of enforcing environmental regulations, the health benefits of improved air quality, and the costs of waterborne disease outbreaks. He received his A.B. in mathematics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, his M.A. in mathematics from Cornell University, and his Ph.D. in city and regional planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Philip Howard is a senior director at Syracuse Research Corporation. His expertise is in exposure and risk assessment, environmental fate and transport modeling, and the evaluation of data related to the physical and chemical properties of chemicals. He directed the design and maintenance of Syracuse Research Corporation’s Environmental Fate Database. He also directed the information evaluation and peer review of the Environmental Fate and Exposure section of the National Library of Medicine's Hazardous Substance Data Bank. In addition, he is the director of a project for EPA to review data registration packages on the chemistry and fate of pesticides in the environment to identify variances from published guidelines, standard evaluation practices, and data review guidelines. Kimberly L. Jones is associate professor of civil engineering at Howard University. Her research interests include physical-chemical treatment processes, membrane processes, adsorption, mass transport, interfacial phenomenon, water and wastewater treatment plant design, and water quality. Dr. Jones also is the deputy director of the Keck Center for the Design of Nanoscale Materials for Molecular Recognition. She received her B.S. in civil engineering from Howard University, her M.S. in civil

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Models in Environmental Regulatory Decision Making engineering from the University of Illinois, and her Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University. Thomas E. McKone is a senior scientist and deputy department head at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and is an adjunct professor in the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include the chemical transport and accumulation of toxic chemicals in multiple environmental media (air, water, soil), developing multimedia compartment models that can be used in quantitative risk assessments, and human exposure and health risk assessment. Dr. McKone has served on previous NRC study committees. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles. Naomi Oreskes is an associate professor in the Department of History at the University of California, San Diego, where she also directs the Program in Science Studies. Her research focuses on the historical development of scientific knowledge, methods, and practices in the earth and environmental sciences. Dr. Oreskes has also been a visiting associate professor in the Department of History of Science at Harvard University. Before going to the University of California, she was an associate professor of history and philosophy of science at New York University. She was a member of the NRC Committee for the International Union of Geological Sciences. She received her B.Sc. from University of London in England and her Ph.D. from Stanford University. Spyros N. Pandis is professor of chemical engineering at the University of Patras, Greece, and Elias Research Professor of chemical engineering and engineering and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests include atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric pollution modeling, aerosol science, global change, and environmental policy analysis. He is serving on the NRC Committee on Air Quality Management in the United States and is a former member of the committee reviewing the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy’s research plan for fine particulates. Dr. Pandis received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Louise M. Ryan is chair of the Biostatistics Department at Harvard School of Public Health. Her research is on statistical methods related to environmental health research and risk assessment. She has served on

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Models in Environmental Regulatory Decision Making advisory boards for several government agencies, including the National Toxicology Program and EPA. Dr. Ryan has served on several previous NRC study committees. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University. Michael L. Stein is a professor of statistics at the University of Chicago and director of the Center for Integrating Statistical and Environmental Science. His research interests focus on statistical models and methods for spatial and spatial-temporal processes. He is interested in the nature of the spatial-temporal interactions implied by these models and on developing statistical methods for assessing these interactions. Dr. Stein received his B.S. in mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his M.S. and Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. Wendy E. Wagner is a professor of law at the University of Texas at Austin. Before entering teaching, she practiced for 4 years, first as an honors attorney in the Enforcement Division of the U.S. Department of Justice's Environment and Natural Resources Division and then as pollution control coordinator in the U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of the General Counsel. Professor Wagner received her M.S. in environmental studies and her law degree from Yale University. She currently serves as an officer in the Society for Risk Analysis and the American Bar Association's Administrative Law Section and is a Member Scholar of the Center for Progressive Regulation.