C
Committee and Staff Biographies

John Gyakum is a Full Professor in Synoptic and Dynamic Meteorology at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. His research focuses on the dynamical processes associated with tropical cyclones that ultimately affect the Atlantic Canada provinces. These cases typically transform from a warm-core convectively driven disturbance into a cold-core extratropical system. During this latter phase, however, these cyclonic systems are often responsible for copious amounts of rainfall in the Atlantic provinces. Work is in progress investigating the processes by which the cyclones transform from tropical to extratropical systems. Additional research is being conducted on the roles that surface fluxes of heat and moisture play in the evolution of these extratropical transformations.


Hugh Willoughby is a Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Earth Sciences at Florida International University, where he teaches in the newly established academic track in Atmospheric Sciences. His research interests include analysis of instrumented aircraft observations of hurricanes and formulation of theoretical models of tropical–cyclone motion and intensification. Until December 2002 he was a Research Meteorologist at the Hurricane Research Division of NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, where he had worked since 1975 and served as director 1995-2002. He has made more than 400 research and reconnaissance flights into the eyes of typhoons and hurricanes. During his time at HRD, Dr. Willoughby occupied the G. J. Haltiner Visiting Research Chair at the Naval Postgraduate School (January–July, 1991); was a Visiting Research Scientist at the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre in Melbourne, Australia (June–July, 1988); and was a Visiting Lecturer at the Shanghai Typhoon Institute (December 1985), where he visited again during the winter of 2004. Before joining HRD, Dr. Willoughby was a commissioned officer in the U. S. Navy. He served as a flight meteorologist in Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE (1970–1971) and on the Military faculty of the Naval Academy (1971–1974), where he taught meteorology, oceanography, geology, and computer science. He left active duty as a Lieutenant (O3). Dr. Willoughby has the following academic degrees: Ph.D. (1977, Atmospheric Science) from the University of Miami, M.S. (1969, Meteorology) from the Naval Postgraduate School, and B.S. (1967, Geophysics–Geochemistry) from the University of Arizona. He is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member the American Geophysical Union and Sigma Xi. He is past chair the AMS Committee on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology.



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Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program’s Synthesis and Assessment Product 3.3, “Weather and Climate Extremes in a Changing Climate” C Committee and Staff Biographies John Gyakum is a Full Professor in Synoptic and Dynamic Meteorology at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. His research focuses on the dynamical processes associated with tropical cyclones that ultimately affect the Atlantic Canada provinces. These cases typically transform from a warm-core convectively driven disturbance into a cold-core extratropical system. During this latter phase, however, these cyclonic systems are often responsible for copious amounts of rainfall in the Atlantic provinces. Work is in progress investigating the processes by which the cyclones transform from tropical to extratropical systems. Additional research is being conducted on the roles that surface fluxes of heat and moisture play in the evolution of these extratropical transformations. Hugh Willoughby is a Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Earth Sciences at Florida International University, where he teaches in the newly established academic track in Atmospheric Sciences. His research interests include analysis of instrumented aircraft observations of hurricanes and formulation of theoretical models of tropical–cyclone motion and intensification. Until December 2002 he was a Research Meteorologist at the Hurricane Research Division of NOAA's Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, where he had worked since 1975 and served as director 1995-2002. He has made more than 400 research and reconnaissance flights into the eyes of typhoons and hurricanes. During his time at HRD, Dr. Willoughby occupied the G. J. Haltiner Visiting Research Chair at the Naval Postgraduate School (January–July, 1991); was a Visiting Research Scientist at the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre in Melbourne, Australia (June–July, 1988); and was a Visiting Lecturer at the Shanghai Typhoon Institute (December 1985), where he visited again during the winter of 2004. Before joining HRD, Dr. Willoughby was a commissioned officer in the U. S. Navy. He served as a flight meteorologist in Airborne Early Warning Squadron ONE (1970–1971) and on the Military faculty of the Naval Academy (1971–1974), where he taught meteorology, oceanography, geology, and computer science. He left active duty as a Lieutenant (O3). Dr. Willoughby has the following academic degrees: Ph.D. (1977, Atmospheric Science) from the University of Miami, M.S. (1969, Meteorology) from the Naval Postgraduate School, and B.S. (1967, Geophysics–Geochemistry) from the University of Arizona. He is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member the American Geophysical Union and Sigma Xi. He is past chair the AMS Committee on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology.

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Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program’s Synthesis and Assessment Product 3.3, “Weather and Climate Extremes in a Changing Climate” Cortis Cooper has been actively involved in ocean research and development since receiving his BSc and MSc in Engineering at MIT in 1977. He later returned and obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Maine in 1987. Dr. Cooper is an oceanographer in the energy technology company of Chevron. He is also a Chevron Fellow, one of 6 scientists and engineers chosen for their technical contributions to the company. His research efforts have included leading the first comprehensive velocity surveys of the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico in the early 1980s and developing a hurricane current model whose results were later adopted as the industry standard. Dr. Cooper has initiated and lead six Joint Industry Projects (JIP) one of them included 32 companies and another 25. These JIPs have successfully resolved major technical questions and established industry standards in some cases. He has been a contributing author of six books, published 14 journal articles, and 32 conference papers. A former member of the Ocean Studies Board, he served on the NRC Committee on Oil in the Sea: Inputs, Fates, and Effects and the Review of JSOST Research Priorities Plan; and has been a frequent advisor to government agencies including NOAA, USGS, U.S. Navy, and the Minerals Management Service (MMS). Michael J. Hayes is a climate impacts specialist for the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) and associate professor in the School of Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln (UNL). Since coming to UNL in 1995, Dr. Hayes has been mostly associated with the climate and bio-atmospheric sciences and human dimensions program areas and work in outreach and extension. His main research interests are precipitation indices, drought mitigation, drought impacts, drought vulnerability, risk analyses and remote sensing. Dr. Hayes received a bachelor's from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Meteorology and his master's and doctorate from the University of Missouri-Columbia in Atmospheric Sciences Gregory Jenkins is an associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the graduate director for the Howard University Program in Atmospheric Sciences (HUPAS). He has numerous research interests with an emphasis on regional climate change and precipitation processes in West Africa, anthropogenic and natural sources of tropospheric ozone in the tropics, and studies in paleoclimate. Dr. Jenkins joined Howard University during 2003 after spending 10 years at Penn State University as a faculty member and researcher in the Department of Meteorology and the Earth System Science System. He spent 2 years at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo. after finishing his doctoral research in atmospheric and space sciences at the University of Michigan. Dr. Jenkins is a member of the American Meteorological Society, the American Geophysical Union (AGU), is an associated editor for AGU-Journal of Geophysical Research and serves as a member on several national committees. David Karoly is Williams Chair Professor of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma. He joined the School of Meteorology faculty in January 2003 from Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, where he was Professor of Meteorology and Head of

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Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program’s Synthesis and Assessment Product 3.3, “Weather and Climate Extremes in a Changing Climate” the School of Mathematical Sciences. From August 1995, he was Director of the Cooperative Research Centre for Southern Hemisphere Meteorology at Monash University until it closed in June 2000. He is active in research into the dynamics of the large-scale circulation of the atmosphere and its variability on time scales from days to decades. Specific research interests include climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion and interannual climate variations due to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. He is a member of a number of international committees, including the WMO/CLIVAR Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices and the WCRP Working Group on Coupled Modeling. He was Review Editor of the chapter "Understanding and Attributing Climate Change" in "Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis" and is a lead author of the chapter "Assessment of Observed Changes and Responses in Natural and Managed Systems" in "Climate Change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerabilities", two volumes in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In 1993, Professor Karoly received the Meisinger Award from the American Meteorological Society, with citation "for contributions to the understanding of the role of Rossby wave propagation in atmospheric teleconnections and to greenhouse climate change research." In 1999, he was elected a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society for outstanding contributions to the atmospheric sciences over a substantial period of years. Dr. Karoly also served on the Climate Research Committee from 2003 to 2006. Richard Rotunno received his Ph.D. in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics from Princeton University in 1976. He has spent most of the past 30 years at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, where he has been a Senior Scientist since 1989, and Assistant Director of the Microscale and Mesoscale Meteorology Division since 1999. He has worked on the fluid dynamics of atmospheric flows, in particular tornadoes, and the rotating thunderstorms that produce tornadoes known as supercells, squall lines, hurricanes and polar lows, midlatitude cyclones and fronts, density-stratified flow past mountains, sea breezes, and variety of related problems such as the dynamics of density currents, internal bores and hydraulic jumps. Through a combination of theory and numerical modeling, his work is directed at the understanding needed to make progress in the forecasting of mesoscale weather phenomena. In 2004 he was the recipient of the American Meteorological Society's Jule G. Charney Award. Claudia Tebaldi obtained her Ph.D. in Statistics from Duke University in 1997. Since then she has been at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, in Boulder, CO, first as a post-doc in the Geophysical Statistics Project and then as a Project Scientist. She is currently a visiting scientist at Stanford University. Her appointment is shared by three divisions: the Institute for the Study of Society and Environment, the Climate and Global Dynamics Division and the Institute for Mathematics Applied to the Geosciences. She focuses on statistical analysis of observational and modeled data within studies of climatic variability and change. Dr. Tebaldi has contributed to the current IPCC-AR4, WG1, in Chapter 11 on Regional Projections, and some of her recent work is cited in both Chapter 10 (Global Projections) and Chapter 11.

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Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program’s Synthesis and Assessment Product 3.3, “Weather and Climate Extremes in a Changing Climate” Curtis H. Marshall is a Program Officer with the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. He received B.S. (1995) and M.S. (1998) degrees in meteorology from the University of Oklahoma, and a Ph.D. (2004) in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University. His Doctoral research examined the impact of anthropogenic land-use change on the mesoscale climate of the Florida peninsula. Prior to joining the staff of BASC in 2006, he was employed as a research scientist in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, where he focused on the development of coupled atmosphere – land surface models. Katherine Weller is a Senior Program Assistant for the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC) and the Polar Research Board (PRB). In 2004, she received her B.S. from the University of Michigan in Biopsychology. She is currently working toward a master’s degree in Environmental Science and Policy from Johns Hopkins University.