APPENDIX A
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Theodore L. Phillips, Chair, is the Wun-Kon Fu Distinguished Professor of Radiation Oncology at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Phillips was previously associate director of the UCSF Cancer Center and chairman of the department of radiation oncology. He is a past president of both the Radiation Research Society and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Dr. Phillips received the O. H. Perry Pepper Research Prize, the Gold Medal of the Gilbert H. Fletcher Society, the Janeway Medal of the American Radium Society, the Del Regato Award from Indiana University, the C. Chester Stock Award from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the Gold Medal of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and the Gold Medal of the American College of Radiology. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has served on several committees for the National Research Council and was a member of the Board on Radiation Effects Research. He sits on the board of directors for Intraop Medical, which makes a device for intraoperative radiation therapy. Dr. Phillips received his Sc.B. in chemistry from Dickinson College and his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.


Everett E. Bloom is associate director of the Center for Materials Processing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Prior to joining the university, he had a 42-year career at Oak Ridge National Laboratory culminating as director of the laboratory's Metals and Ceramics Division. He is an expert in materials science, particularly in nuclear applications. Dr. Bloom received the Department of Energy's Distinguished Associate Award for his role in the U.S. DOE Fusion Materials Program. He has authored more than 200 papers and holds several patents. He serves on the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology Academic Advisory Board and received its Distinguished Alumni Award in 2003. He is currently on the National Research Council's National Materials Advisory Board. Dr. Bloom earned his B.S. in metallurgical engineering from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology and his M.S. and Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.


David R. Clarke is a professor in the Materials Department of the University of California at Santa Barbara, where he has worked since 1990. He previously worked at the IBM Research Division, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Rockwell International Science Center, the University of California at Berkeley, and the National Physical Laboratory in England. Dr. Clarke's expertise is in the relationship between material microstructure and material properties, materials design and processing, and nondestructive evaluation. Much of his research has focused on electronic and structural ceramics, but he has also worked on extending the life of gas-turbine engines and developing waste forms for radioactive waste disposal. Dr. Clarke has received numerous awards, including the Sosman Memorial Award from the American Ceramics Society and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Senior Scientist Award. He is an academician of the International Academy of Ceramics, a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Ceramics Society, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Clarke is author or coauthor of more than 350 papers and holds 6 patents. He has served as member or chair on four previous committees of the National Research Council.



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APPENDIX A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS Theodore L. Phillips, Chair, is the Wun-Kon Fu Distinguished Professor of Radiation Oncology at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Phillips was previously associate director of the UCSF Cancer Center and chairman of the department of radiation oncology. He is a past president of both the Radiation Research Society and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. Dr. Phillips received the O. H. Perry Pepper Research Prize, the Gold Medal of the Gilbert H. Fletcher Society, the Janeway Medal of the American Radium Society, the Del Regato Award from Indiana University, the C. Chester Stock Award from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the Gold Medal of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and the Gold Medal of the American College of Radiology. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has served on several committees for the National Research Council and was a member of the Board on Radiation Effects Research. He sits on the board of directors for Intraop Medical, which makes a device for intraoperative radiation therapy. Dr. Phillips received his Sc.B. in chemistry from Dickinson College and his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Everett E. Bloom is associate director of the Center for Materials Processing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Prior to joining the university, he had a 42-year career at Oak Ridge National Laboratory culminating as director of the laboratory's Metals and Ceramics Division. He is an expert in materials science, particularly in nuclear applications. Dr. Bloom received the Department of Energy's Distinguished Associate Award for his role in the U.S. DOE Fusion Materials Program. He has authored more than 200 papers and holds several patents. He serves on the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology Academic Advisory Board and received its Distinguished Alumni Award in 2003. He is currently on the National Research Council's National Materials Advisory Board. Dr. Bloom earned his B.S. in metallurgical engineering from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology and his M.S. and Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. David R. Clarke is a professor in the Materials Department of the University of California at Santa Barbara, where he has worked since 1990. He previously worked at the IBM Research Division, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Rockwell International Science Center, the University of California at Berkeley, and the National Physical Laboratory in England. Dr. Clarke's expertise is in the relationship between material microstructure and material properties, materials design and processing, and nondestructive evaluation. Much of his research has focused on electronic and structural ceramics, but he has also worked on extending the life of gas-turbine engines and developing waste forms for radioactive waste disposal. Dr. Clarke has received numerous awards, including the Sosman Memorial Award from the American Ceramics Society and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Senior Scientist Award. He is an academician of the International Academy of Ceramics, a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Ceramics Society, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Clarke is author or coauthor of more than 350 papers and holds 6 patents. He has served as member or chair on four previous committees of the National Research Council. 189

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190 RADIATION SOURCE USE AND REPLACEMENT Dr. Clarke received his B.Sc. in applied sciences from the University of Sussex, England, and his Ph.D. in physics from Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. Leonard W. Connell is a distinguished member of the technical staff in the National Security Studies Department of the Systems Analysis Group at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where he has worked for 26 years. He is a technical advisor to senior laboratory management on nuclear weapons, nuclear terrorism, and unconventional nuclear warfare. Prior to joining Sandia, he was an officer in the U.S. Navy, teaching at the Naval Nuclear Power School. Dr. Connell's work has ranged from aerodynamics of reentry vehicles and space nuclear power and propulsion for Mars exploration to pulsed laser effects and countermeasures for dealing with radiological terrorism. He has led studies at Sandia evaluating the security of gamma irradiators and the risks from radiological attacks using high- intensity radiation sources. Dr. Connell received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Michigan Technological University and his Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of New Mexico. Robin P. Gardner is director of the Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes and professor of nuclear and chemical engineering at North Carolina State University. He is an expert in industrial and medical radiation and radioisotope measurement applications. Using experiments and simulations, he works to optimize design of applications using radioisotope tracers, nuclear gauges, nuclear analyzers, nuclear oil-well logging devices and computed tomography devices. Dr. Gardner received his B.Ch.E. and M.S. in chemical engineering from North Carolina State University and his Ph.D. in fuel technology from Pennsylvania State University. C. Richard Liu is a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Houston. He joined the department in 1988 as a postdoctoral research associate. Dr. Liu's research is in electrical properties of rocks, well logging, microwave passive and active networks, radiofrequency circuit design, radio systems and networking, numerical computation of electromagnetic scattering and propagation, hardware and software design of ground-penetrating radar systems, electromagnetic tomography, and microwave telecommunication systems. He is a member of the Research Management Committee of the Texas Department of Transportation. Dr. Liu is also an active member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the Environmental and Engineering Geophysics Society, and the Society of Professional Well Logging Analysts. Dr. Liu received his B.S., M.S., and Ph. D. degrees in electrical engineering from Jiaotong University, Xian, China, in 1982, 1984, and 1988, respectively. Ruth McBurney is the executive director of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors. She has worked in the field of radiation protection for over 25 years, having served previously as director of the Division of Licensing, Registration, and Standards in the Bureau of Radiation Control in the Texas Department of Health. Ms. McBurney was the 2005-2006 president of the Health Physics Society. She has served as treasurer and chairperson of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, and received its highest award, the Gerald S. Parker Award of Merit, in 1994. Ms. McBurney has also served as a representative on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee for the Medical Use of Isotopes and on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s National Mammography Quality Assurance Advisory Committee. Ms. McBurney received her B.S. in biology from Henderson State University in Arkansas and her M.S. in Radiation Sciences from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. She is a certified health physicist.

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS 191 Ervin B. Podgorsak is professor and director of the Department of Medical Physics in the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University, in Montreal. Dr. Podgorsak has been at McGill since 1975. His research has ranged from dosimetry to novel irradiation techniques that have resulted in changes in clinical practice. Among his recent research areas is work on stereotactic radiosurgery. Dr. Podgorsak has authored or co-authored 140 peer-reviewed publications, 85 book chapters or conference proceedings, 4 monographs, and 3 textbooks, including a book on radiation physics for medical physicists. He also edited a handbook on radiation oncology physics. He was president of the board of the Canadian College of Physicists in Medicine and was a member of advisory boards for the National Research Council in Ottawa, Canada, the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Dr. Podgorsak is a fellow of the Canadian College of Physicists in Medicine and the American Board of Medical Physics. In 2005, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award in Medical Physics from the Upstate New York Chapter of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and in 2006 the William D. Coolidge Award from the AAPM. Dr. Podgorsak received his B.Sc. in physics from the University of Ljubljana, in Slovenia, and his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Tor Raubenheimer is an associate professor at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). He is an expert in accelerator physics, design issues in next generation linear colliders, ion/beam-plasma instabilities in rings and linacs, and effects during bunch length compression. Dr. Raubenheimer has been a Panofsky Fellow at SLAC and a visiting associate scientist at CERN. He received the American Physical Society's Division of Beam Physics Dissertation Award and the U.S. Particle Accelerator School Prize for Achievement in Accelerator Physics and Technology, and is a fellow of the American Physical Society. Dr. Raubenheimer received his B.S. in physics and computer science from Dartmouth College and his Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University. Stephen Wagner is the director of pathogen management and blood product improvement in the Blood Components Department of the American Red Cross's Holland Laboratory for the Biomedical Sciences in Rockville, Maryland. Dr. Wagner received the Daymon Runyon-Walter Winchell Fellowship Grant from the National Cancer Institute and the National Tiffany Award from the American Red Cross for outstanding technical achievement. Dr. Wagner has taught at Bowling Green State University and is a member of the American Society for Microbiology, the American Society for Photobiology, the American Association of Blood Banks, the International Society for Blood Transfusion, and the American Society for Hematology. Dr. Wagner received his B.S. in chemistry from the University of Maryland, College Park, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in biophysics from the Pennsylvania State University. David L. Weimer is a professor of political science and public affairs at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Before his appointment at Madison in 2000, he was on the faculty of the University of Rochester. He is an expert in cost-benefit analysis, health policy, and design and functioning of institutions, and also conducts research on energy security, natural resource policy, and education. Dr. Weimer is a past president of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management. He has served as a visiting professor at Lingnan College in Hong Kong and as an economist in the Department of Energy's Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis. He previously served on a committee for the Energy Engineering Board of the National Research Council. Dr. Weimer received his B.S. degree in engineering and applied science and his B.A. in urban studies from the University of Rochester, and received his M.A. in statistics and his M.P.P. and Ph.D. in public policy from the University of California at Berkeley.

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