TABLE 7.4 Summary of FY 2005 and Proposed Additional Funding for Coal-Related R&D at Federal Agencies (millions of dollars per year)

 

FY 2005 Funding

Proposed New Funding

Total Proposed Funding

Resource and reserve assessments and characterizationa

10

20

30

Improved mine worker health and safetyb

25

35

60

Environmental protection and reclamationb

10

60

70

Improved mining productivity and resource optimizationb

1

29

30

Total

46

144

190

NOTE: FY 2005 figures are rounded to nearest million for easier comparison with proposed funding levels (unrounded figures for FY 2005 funding are presented in Table 7.2)

aDescribed in Chapters 3 and 6. Amounts do not include funding for the DOE-FE Carbon Sequestration Program, which supports a range of sequestration research and demonstration activities that include geologic sequestration site characterizations.

bDescribed in Chapter 4.

  • The USGS should lead a program, in cooperation with state agencies, the coal industry, and other federal offices, to quantify and characterize the nation’s coal reserves. The committee estimates that this will require additional funding of approximately $10 million per year.

  • NIOSH should lead an expanded health and safety program, in cooperation with MSHA and the coal industry, to address a range of specific mine safety issues (e.g., ventilation, roof control, escape and rescue, communications systems, training) and to develop improved remote sensing and automation technologies. The committee estimates that this will require additional funding of approximately $35 million per year.

  • OSM should lead an expanded program, in cooperation with EPA, state agencies, and the coal industry, to mitigate adverse environmental impacts associated with past, existing, and future coal mining and processing. The committee estimates that this will require additional funding of approximately $60 million per year.

  • The DOE Office of Fossil Energy should lead a program, in cooperation with NSF, OSM, NIOSH, academic institutions, and the coal industry, to develop and demonstrate advanced coal mining and processing technology. The committee estimates that this will require a total of approximately $60 million per year and recommends that this should comprise $30 million in federal support, with cost sharing from non-federal sources.

  • The USGS should lead a program to identify and characterize the nation’s potential CO2 geologic sequestration resources, with close collaboration with the Carbon Sequestration Program managed by DOE-FE, and the states involved in



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