Appendixes



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 137
Coal Research and Development: to Support National Energy Policy Appendixes

OCR for page 137
Coal Research and Development: to Support National Energy Policy This page intentionally left blank.

OCR for page 137
Coal Research and Development: to Support National Energy Policy Appendix A Committee and Staff Biographies Corale L. Brierley, Chair (NAE), provides technical and business consultation to the mining and chemical industries and government organizations through Brierley Consultancy LLC. Previously, Dr. Brierley worked as chemical microbiologist at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, as chief of environmental process development for Newmont Mining Corporation, as general partner at VistaTech Partnership, Ltd., and as president of Advanced Mineral Technologies, Inc. Her research interests include the treatment and management of metal-bearing aqueous, solid, and radioactive wastes and biotechnology applied to mine production. She is on the International Advisory Committee for the Biohydrometallurgy Symposia and the Editorial Board for Hydrometallurgy Journal. Dr. Brierley served on the National Academy of Engineering’s 2007 Nominating Committee, Committee on Membership, and the Grainger Challenge Prize Committee. She has served on several National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the Committee on the Superfund Site Assessment and Remediation in the Coeur d’Alene River Basin, the Committee on Technology for the Mining Industries, the Committee on Earth Resources, the Committee on Novel Approaches to the Management of Greenhouse Gases, and chair of the Committee to Review the USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) Mineral Resources Program. She also chairs the Engineering Panel for the Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships Program. Dr. Brierley holds a Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Texas at Dallas. Francis P. Burke retired at the end of 2006 after serving in the research and development department of CONSOL Energy Inc. (and its predecessor organizations) since 1975. In 1996 he became vice president of Research and Development, with

OCR for page 137
Coal Research and Development: to Support National Energy Policy general management responsibility for CONSOL’s research program. The goal of CONSOL’s R&D program is to identify, develop, and apply technology that advances the near-term and strategic interests of CONSOL’s coal, natural gas, and other business units. In 2004, he became vice president of science & technology, with responsibilities in the areas of energy and environmental policy, and since retiring he continues to consult for CONSOL Energy on these issues. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and serves on the NRC’s Committee on Earth Resources, the Advisory Board of the Pittsburgh Coal Conference, the Advisory Board of the Dominion Center for Engineering and the Environment at the University of Pittsburgh, and the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) working group on Strategic Initiatives for Coal and Power. Dr. Burke is the author of more than 80 scientific papers and publications, and holds five U.S. patents on coal-related technology. He is a member of Phi Kappa Phi and the American Chemical Society, was twice the recipient of the American Chemical Society Fuel Chemistry Division’s R. A. Glenn Award, and received the Senator Jennings Randolph Lifetime Achievement Award presented by the Washington Coal Club in December 2006. Dr. Burke holds a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Iowa State University, and he has completed the Executive Program at the Darden School of the University of Virginia. James C. Cobb is an adjunct professor in the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Kentucky, the director of the Kentucky Geological Survey, and the state geologist of Kentucky. Dr. Cobb has been with the Kentucky Geological Survey for the past 27 years. He has served in the capacity of a geologist, a section head, and an assistant state geologist for research. His research interests include coal geology with respect to coal availability and resources of Kentucky; estimating compliance coal resources for Kentucky; deposition, resources, sulfur, mining; basin evolution with respect to mineral formation in coal; hydrogeology with respect to groundwater aquifers in North Africa; modern analogues of coal formation in Indonesia; and industrial minerals with respect to Cretaceous-Tertiary gravel, and Pleistocene sand and gravel in Illinois. Throughout his career, Dr. Cobb has published in more than 60 journals, survey publications, special papers, abstracts, and reports. Dr. Cobb received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Urbana. Robert B. Finkelman was formerly a senior scientist and project chief for the Eastern Energy Resources Team at the U.S. Geological Survey. His research interests include coal chemistry and medical geology. Dr. Finkelman has a diverse professional background—he worked at the USGS for 32 years, at Exxon for 7 years, and has experience as a consultant and as a college instructor. Most of Dr. Finkelman’s professional career has been devoted to understanding the properties of coal and how these properties affect coal’s technological performance,

OCR for page 137
Coal Research and Development: to Support National Energy Policy economic by-product potential, and environmental and health impacts. For the past 10 years he has devoted his efforts to developing the field of medical geology. Dr. Finkelman is a fellow of the Geological Society of America (GSA), is the author of more than 550 publications, and is a recipient of the Gordon H. Wood Jr. Memorial Award from the American Association of Petroleum Geologists Eastern Section and the Cady Award from the GSA’s Coal Geology Division. Dr. Finkelman received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Maryland. William Fulkerson is presently a senior fellow with the Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment (ISSE) at the University of Tennessee. Prior to his retirement in 1994 from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, he was associate laboratory director for energy and environmental technologies. His current interests include global sustainability issues with emphasis on energy and environmental technologies and policies. Since 1994, he has chaired the DOE Laboratory Energy R&D Working Group (LERDWG), an organization of energy R&D managers from 14 DOE labs including all of the national labs concerned with energy R&D. During 1999 and 2000, LERDWG helped the under secretary of energy analyze the DOE energy R&D portfolio with respect to its adequacy for making progress on DOE strategic goals related to the environment, the economy, and national security. More recently, LERDWG has assisted DOE in the planning of the National Climate Change Technology Initiative of the Bush Administration and with drafting a strategic plan for the Clean Energy Technology Export Initiative. Dr. Fulkerson was a member of the Energy R&D Panel of the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology, and he chaired the panel’s task force on fossil energy. He was a member of the NRC Board on Energy and Environmental Systems from 1996 to 2002. Dr. Fulkerson received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Rice University. Harold J. Gluskoter is a scientist emeritus with the U.S. Geological Survey. His research interests include national and international coal resource assessments. Dr. Gluskoter is one of the nation’s leading coal geologists and he played a significant role in the national coal assessment. He was awarded the Geological Society of America’s Gilbert H. Cady Award for contributions that advance the field of coal geology in North America. His research interests, in addition to coal resource assessments, have included coal geochemistry as it is related to coal utilization and the environment and more recent studies of the potential for sequestering carbon dioxide in coal beds. Dr. Gluskoter also brings a state agency perspective through his former service with the Illinois State Geological Survey. Dr. Gluskoter received his Ph.D. in geology from the University of California, Berkeley. Michael E. Karmis is the Stonie Barker Professor of Mining and Minerals Engineering and director of the Virginia Center for Coal and Energy Research at

OCR for page 137
Coal Research and Development: to Support National Energy Policy Virginia Polytechnic Institute. His broad research interests are in mine planning and design, ground control, carbon sequestration, and the sustainable development of energy and mineral resources. An author of more than 150 publications, Dr. Karmis has been active in consulting with the minerals industry, consulting companies, government organizations, and legal firms. He served as the 2002 president of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME) and the 2002-2003 President of the Society of Mining Professors. He is a distinguished member of the SME, a fellow of the Institute of Quarrying, and a fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining. Dr. Karmis received his Ph.D. from the University of Strathclyde, U.K. Klaus S. Lackner is the Ewing-Worzel Professor of Geophysics in the Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering at Columbia University. He previously held postdoctoral positions at the California Institute of Technology and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center before joining Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1983 in the Theoretical Division. He also held several management positions, including acting associate laboratory director for strategic and supporting research. Currently, he is developing innovative approaches to energy issues of the future. He has been instrumental in forming ZECA, the Zero Emission Coal Alliance, which was an early industry-led effort to develop coal power with zero emissions to the atmosphere. His most recent work is on environmentally acceptable technologies for the use of fossil fuels. Dr. Lackner received his Ph.D. in theoretical particle physics from Heidelberg University, Germany. Reginald E. Mitchell is an associate professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. He is the current director of the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory, a research laboratory within the Thermosciences Group that houses research in combustion science, pollution science, fluid mechanics, spray dynamics, plasma science, materials synthesis, and laser-based optical diagnostics. Dr. Mitchell’s research interests include coal and biomass combustion and gasification, pyrite combustion, pollutant formation and destruction during combustion, and hydrocarbon flame chemistry and structure. He is an active member of the Combustion Institute, having held several positions on the Executive Committee of its Westerns States Section and is a member of the National Organization of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, having served as chair of its Western Region for several years. Dr. Mitchell holds a Sc.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Raja V. Ramani (NAE) is emeritus George H. Jr. and Anne B. Deike Chair in Mining Engineering and emeritus professor of mining and geoenvironmental engineering at the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Ramani holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mining engineering from Penn State where he has been on the faculty since 1970. His research activities include mine health, safety,

OCR for page 137
Coal Research and Development: to Support National Energy Policy productivity, environment, and management; flow mechanisms of air, gas, and dust in mining environs; and innovative mining methods. Dr. Ramani has been a consultant to the United Nations, World Bank, and National Safety Council and has received numerous awards from academia and technical and professional societies. He was the 1995 president of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration, Inc. He served on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s (DHHS) Mine Health Research Advisory Committee (1991-1998). He has served on a number of NRC committees, including the Committee on Coal Waste Impoundments, the Panel on Technologies for the Mining Industries, the Committee on the Review of NIOSH (National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) Research Programs, and was chair of the Committee to Review the NIOSH Mining Safety and Health Research Program. In 2002, he chaired the Pennsylvania Governor’s Commission on Abandoned Mine Voids and Mine Safety that was set up immediately following the Quecreek Mine inundation incident and rescue. Jean-Michel M. Rendu (NAE) is a mining consultant and retired vice president for resources and mine planning at Newmont Mining Corporation. Dr. Rendu was previously an associate with Golder Associates in Denver, Colorado; an adjunct professor at the Colorado School of Mines; an assistant professor of mining engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Madison; and head of operations research with Anglovaal in Johannesburg, South Africa. Dr. Rendu is recognized as a leader in the development of national and international standards for the evaluation and public reporting of mineral resources and reserves. His current interests are in optimizing the evaluation, development, and operation of mining projects using appropriate mathematical and managerial technology; as well as drilling and sampling methods, deposit modeling, mine design, ore control, reconciliation of production results with exploration models, and development of computerized systems that facilitate and speed up data collection, quality control, data analysis, and decision making. Dr. Rendu received his doctor of engineering science from Columbia University. Edward S. Rubin is a professor in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy and the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He holds a chair as the Alumni Professor of Environmental Engineering and Science and was founding director of the university’s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies and the Environmental Institute. His teaching and research are in the areas of energy utilization, environmental control, technology innovation, and technology-policy interactions, with a particular focus on issues related to coal utilization and global climate change. He is a fellow member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a past chairman of its Environmental Control Division, and recipient of the Air and Waste Management Association Lyman A. Ripperton Award for distinguished achievements as an educator. He

OCR for page 137
Coal Research and Development: to Support National Energy Policy has served on advisory committees to the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the National Academies, including two terms on the Board on Energy and Environmental Studies. Dr. Rubin received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. Samuel A. Wolfe is chief counsel for the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, where he leads a team working on federal and regional energy policy issues and oversees a staff of legal specialists working on state regulatory matters involving natural gas, electricity, water, and telecommunications and cable television. Previously, as assistant commissioner at the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), he supervised NJDEP’s Division of Air Quality, Division of Water Quality, and Division of Environmental Safety and Health. He led NJDEP’s efforts to reduce mercury emissions from New Jersey’s coal-fired power plants and other sources, helped develop key aspects of a seven-state agreement to cap greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, and worked to strengthen federal regulation of power plant emissions. Mr. Wolfe has also served as environmental policy manager for PSEG Services Corporation, where he led the company’s environmental due diligence for potential acquisitions of electric generating facilities; made proposals to the EPA, environmental groups, and other stakeholders to reform the New Source Review program under the Clean Air Act; and worked to resolve environmental permitting and enforcement issues with regulatory agencies. Mr. Wolfe holds a B.A. from Cornell University and a J.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. National Research Council Staff David A. Feary is a senior program officer with the NRC’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR) and staff director of BESRs Committee on Seismology and Geodynamics. Prior to joining the NRC, he spent 15 years as a research scientist with the marine program at the Australian Geological Survey Organisation (now Geoscience Australia). During this time, he participated in numerous national and international research cruises to better understand the role of climate as a primary control on carbonate reef formation and to improve understanding of cool-water carbonate depositional processes and controls. Dr. Feary received his Ph.D. from the Australian National University.