Study Committee Biographical Information

Martin Wachs is director of the Transportation, Space, and Technology Program at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California. He retired at the end of 2005 from the University of California, Berkeley, where he was director of the Institute of Transportation Studies and held faculty appointments as professor of city and regional planning and of civil and environmental engineering. His research is in transportation planning and policy, including public transit systems and evaluation of alternative transportation projects. Recently, his writings have dealt with the relationships among transportation, air quality, and land use and with transportation finance. Dr. Wachs is a member and past chair of the Executive Committee of the Transportation Research Board (TRB). He has served on numerous committees appointed by the National Research Council (NRC) and chaired the Committee for the Evaluation of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program. He holds MS and PhD degrees in transportation planning from Northwestern University and a BS degree in civil engineering from City University of New York.


Laura L. Cove is manager of the Traffic Engineering Group for the Town of Cary, North Carolina. Before taking that position, she was manager of the Technical Services Group of the Transportation Planning Branch of the North Carolina Department of Transportation. This group is responsible for travel demand model development and applications for the 17 North Carolina metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs), including determination of conformity of transportation plans with air quality regulations. The group is also responsible for the department’s traffic surveys. Ms. Cove has worked as assistant director for the Office of Strategic Planning at the Tennessee Department of Transportation and as an engineer for the Federal Highway



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Study Committee Biographical Information Martin Wachs is director of the Transportation, Space, and Technology Pro- gram at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California. He retired at the end of 2005 from the University of California, Berkeley, where he was direc- tor of the Institute of Transportation Studies and held faculty appointments as professor of city and regional planning and of civil and environmental engi- neering. His research is in transportation planning and policy, including public transit systems and evaluation of alternative transportation projects. Recently, his writings have dealt with the relationships among transportation, air quality, and land use and with transportation finance. Dr. Wachs is a mem- ber and past chair of the Executive Committee of the Transportation Research Board (TRB). He has served on numerous committees appointed by the Natio- nal Research Council (NRC) and chaired the Committee for the Evaluation of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program. He holds MS and PhD degrees in transportation planning from Northwestern University and a BS degree in civil engineering from City University of New York. Laura L. Cove is manager of the Traffic Engineering Group for the Town of Cary, North Carolina. Before taking that position, she was manager of the Technical Services Group of the Transportation Planning Branch of the North Carolina Department of Transportation. This group is responsible for travel demand model development and applications for the 17 North Carolina metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs), including determination of conformity of transportation plans with air quality regulations. The group is also responsible for the department’s traffic surveys. Ms. Cove has worked as assistant director for the Office of Strategic Planning at the Tennessee Department of Transportation and as an engineer for the Federal Highway 127

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METROPOLITAN TRAVEL FORECASTING Current Practice and Future Direction 128 Administration division offices in Tennessee and North Carolina. She is a licensed professional engineer and holds MS and BS degrees in civil engineer- ing from Clemson University. Thomas B. Deen (Member, National Academy of Engineering) is a trans- portation consultant and former executive director of TRB, a position he held from 1980 to 1994. He is former chairman and president of PRC-Voorhees, a transportation engineering and planning consulting firm with clients world- wide. His research interests include intermodal planning of urban transporta- tion systems. Early in his career, Mr. Deen was a pioneer in the development and application of computer-based modeling methods for analyzing urban transportation problems and designing urban transit systems. Initially, these methods were used in the planning of the Washington, D.C., Metrorail sys- tem; they have subsequently been used to plan and design transit systems throughout the world. After leaving his position with TRB, he served as chair of a panel appointed by the Governor of Maryland to make recommendations on the Intercounty Connector. He also served as vice chair of the NRC Committee on Transportation of Radioactive Waste, was chair of a panel inves- tigating the Chesapeake Bay Bridge deck failure, and was cochair of a commit- tee established to advise the Maryland legislature on a high-speed maglev system for the Northeast Corridor. He holds a BS degree from the University of Kentucky and a certificate from the Yale University Bureau of Highway Traffic. George B. Dresser is a senior research scientist at the Texas Transportation Institute and is program manager for the transportation planning program. He has provided extensive planning and travel modeling services for the Texas Department of Transportation and many of the state’s MPOs. He has partic- ular expertise in modeling and forecasting mobile source emissions for air quality planning. He has taught courses in urban travel demand forecasting through the National Highway Institute. Dr. Dresser holds a PhD in civil engineering, an MS degree in statistics from Texas A&M University, and a BS degree in chemistry from the College of William and Mary. Ronald W. Eash is currently a visiting scholar at the Transportation Center of Northwestern University. From 1977 to 2000, he was a senior technical manager at the Chicago Area Transportation Study, the MPO for metro- politan Chicago. In this capacity he was responsible for the implementation of regional travel forecasting models for northeastern Illinois. Features of these

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Study Committee Biographical Information 129 models include simulation of individual travel and mode choice decisions, incorporation of nonmotorized alternatives, and time-of-day traffic assign- ments for air quality conformity. He is a registered professional engineer in Illinois. He holds a master of urban planning and policy degree from the Uni- versity of Illinois and MS and BS degrees in civil engineering from Northwestern University. Robert A. Johnston is an emeritus professor in the Division of Environmen- tal Science and Policy at the University of California, Davis. His major research interests are in the areas of land use plan implementation, open space and ter- restrial habitat protection, transportation and land use modeling, and regional planning support systems. His geographic information system–based urban growth model is being used in 14 California counties. He recently under- took the Assessment of Integrated Transportation/Land Use Models for the California Department of Transportation, which involved reviewing and eval- uating urban models for use by large California MPOs. He is currently on a team applying the PECAS urban model to all of California. Among Professor Johnston’s publications are a chapter, “The Urban Transportation Planning Process,” in The Geography of Urban Transportation, 2004; he coauthored “Comparisons from Sacramento Model Test Bed,” which appeared in Trans- portation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 1780, in 2001. He holds an MA degree in planning from the University of Southern California; an MS degree in renewable natural resources from the University of Nevada, Reno; and a BA degree from Dartmouth College. Eric J. Miller is Bahen-Tanenbaum Professor of Transportation Engineering and Planning at the University of Toronto, where he is also director of the Joint Program in Transportation. His research interests are modeling of transportation–land use interactions, microsimulation modeling, modeling of urban transport emissions and energy consumption, travel demand modeling using disaggregate choice models, travel demand survey methodology, transit route ridership analysis and forecasting, and simulation of transit route operations. He developed GTAMODEL, a multimodal regional transporta- tion modeling system used by public agencies to forecast and analyze travel demand in the Toronto metropolitan area. He is leading a team of researchers from four universities in developing the Integrated Land Use, Transportation, Environment modeling system. Dr. Miller is coauthor of the textbook Urban Transportation Planning and TCRP Report 48: Integrated Urban Models for

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METROPOLITAN TRAVEL FORECASTING Current Practice and Future Direction 130 Simulation of Transit and Land Use Policies: Guidelines for Implementation and Use. He is a member of TRB’s Committee on Travel Demand Forecasting and its Task Force on Moving Activity-Based Approaches to Practice. He holds a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and MASc and BASc degrees from the University of Toronto. Michael R. Morris is director of transportation at the North Central Texas Council of Governments, which he joined as a transportation analyst in 1979. As transportation director for the MPO for Dallas–Fort Worth, he is responsible for analysis of the region’s long-range transportation plan and Transportation Improvement Program to determine travel and air quality emission impacts of proposed capital and operational investments and public policies. Mr. Morris is a registered engineer in the state of Texas. He is a Policy Committee Member of the Association of Metropolitan Planning Organi- zations and a member of TRB’s Executive Committee. Mr. Morris has served on the NRC Committee to Review EPA’s Mobile Source Emissions Factor Model, the Committee for the Evaluation of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program, and the Committee on Air Quality Man- agement in the United States. He holds a BA degree in environmental design and planning and an MS degree in civil engineering from the State University of New York, Buffalo. Richard H. Pratt is the principal of Richard H. Pratt, Consultant, Inc. In this capacity, he has provided advisory and full project transportation planning services across the United States and internationally since 1985. He has been a vice president and head of the Systems Group at Barton-Aschman Associates and a project manager at Alan M. Voorhees & Associates, in charge of system planning studies for the Washington, D.C., Metrorail system. Throughout his career, he has worked on travel model development and applications for pub- lic and private agencies. His most recent work is as principal investigator for the Transit Cooperative Research Program project to prepare the updated third edition of the handbook Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes. Mr. Pratt is a registered engineer in the states of California and Maryland. He holds a BS degree in science from the California Institute of Technology and an MS degree in civil engineering from Northwestern University. Charles L. Purvis is a principal transportation planner/analyst at the Metro- politan Transportation Commission (MTC), Oakland, California, and has

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Study Committee Biographical Information 131 been at MTC since 1981. He is responsible for travel model development and for regional and subregional forecasts of travel for the San Francisco Bay Area. He is also responsible for the analysis and use of data from household travel surveys and the decennial census to support transportation analysis activities. He has chaired or been a member of the TRB Committee on Urban Trans- portation Data and Information Systems since 1989 and has served as chair of the TRB Travel Analysis Methods Section since 2004. He has been a mem- ber of a number of National Cooperative Highway Research Program project panels, including Commuting in America III, Using American Community Survey Data for Transportation Planning, and Standardized Procedures for Personal Travel Surveys. He holds a BA degree in geography from California State University, Northridge, and a master of city and regional planning degree from Rutgers University. Guy Rousseau is modeling manager for the Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC), the MPO for Atlanta, Georgia, which he joined in 1998. He is respon- sible for modeling the impact of regional transportation plan updates and Transportation Improvement Programs, coordinating the travel model with the DRAM-EMPAL land use model, modeling air quality emissions for confor- mity and attainment of clean air goals, implementing geographic information system applications, and obtaining data for the modeling process through house- hold surveys and other studies. Before coming to ARC, he was a principal traffic engineer for the City of Atlanta Department of Public Works, with responsibilities for travel modeling and traffic simulation. Mr. Rousseau has also been a transportation modeler for the MPOs in Dayton, Ohio, and Tulsa, Oklahoma, and for Jefferson Parish, Louisiana. He is a member of the TRB Committees on Transportation Planning Applications, Metadata, and Travel Survey Methods, and a member of the TRB oversight panel for the Airport Cooperative Research Program’s Airport Access Mode Choice Models. He has participated in the Federal Highway Administration’s Travel Model Improvement Program peer review of metropolitan travel forecasting for the North Carolina Department of Transportation and for Memphis, San Diego, St. Louis, and Knoxville. He has undertaken doctoral studies in planning at the University of New Orleans and holds an MSCE degree from Laval University and a BSCE degree from the University of Montreal. Mary Lynn Tischer is the director of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Multimodal Transportation Planning Office and was formerly adviser to the

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METROPOLITAN TRAVEL FORECASTING Current Practice and Future Direction 132 Governor of Virginia. Previously, she was assistant director at the Arizona Department of Transportation, where she worked to improve the transporta- tion planning process throughout the state and initiated the first comprehen- sive long-range plan in cooperation with the Arizona MPOs. She was director of the Office of System and Economic Assessment at the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center. From 1989 to 1997, she was director of the Office of Policy Analysis for the Virginia Department of Transportation. From 1975 to 1989, she held a number of positions at the Federal Highway Administration. There she performed statistical modeling and forecasting, provided technical assistance on modeling and data collection methods, and was an instructor in courses on planning methods. Dr. Tischer is cochair of the Transportation Research Record Publication Board, cochair of the Strategic Highway Research Program II Capacity Committee, and a member of the TRB Committees on Statewide Multimodal Transportation Planning and Performance Measurement. She has served on the editorial boards of a number of transportation journals, was a fellow of the Urban Land Institute, and chaired the Advisory Committee to the Federal Highway Admin- istration’s Travel Model Improvement Program. She holds a PhD in political science from the University of Maryland, an MA degree from American University, and a BA degree from Rosemont College. Richard E. Walker is the Transportation Research and Modeling manager for Metro Portland, the MPO for Portland, Oregon. He manages all programs related to travel forecasting, including data collection, model development, and model applications. His areas of expertise include multimodal, freight, transit, and air quality conformity modeling. He has participated in the peer review of metropolitan travel forecasting models in Santa Cruz, Salt Lake City, Las Vegas, Anchorage, and Phoenix. In Oregon, Mr. Walker has chaired the Modeling Steering Committee and currently is the chair of the Modeling Program Coordination Committee. He is a member of TRB’s Committee on Transportation Planning Applications and its Task Force on Innovations in Freight Transportation Modeling. He holds a BS degree in civil engineering from Montana State University.