Conclusion

At the start of this program, Governor Bob Riley stated that, because of the state’s mix of rural challenges and inequitable distribution of educational resources, some districts “aren’t able to offer classes in foreign languages or advanced math and science. Through ACCESS, we can use existing technology in our schools to open up a world of new opportunities for our kids.” Sustaining the high quality of the program and keeping momentum rolling are difficult as the program expands and time passes. However, Alabama has recognized that meeting this need is integral in providing the type of education necessary to improve student achievement levels and provide necessary skills that allow for individuals, states and the nation to be competitive in this global economy.

Sources

Alabama State Board of Education report 2004-2005

International Society for Technology in Education, “External Evaluation of Alabama’s ACCESS Distance Learning Initiative.”

Melinda Maddox, State Technology Director

T.H.E. Journal, July 2006


Reprinted and used with permission from Melinda Maddox and the State Educational Technology Directors Association



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