Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Workshop Presenters

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Lyn Le Countryman (Cochair) teaches eleventh grade biology and mentors undergraduate education majors at the Malcolm Price Laboratory School and teaches undergraduate biology and graduate-level science classes on the campus of the University of Northern Iowa. In 1994, she was one of the first teachers in the nation to gain national board certification as an early adolescent generalist. She has served as the president of the Iowa Science Teachers Section of the Iowa Academy of Science. She received the 1999 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching and the 1998 Tandy Award for outstanding teaching. She is a founding member of the National Academies Teacher Advisory Council and also is a member of the Teacher Advisory Council Museum Associates for the Marian Koshland Science Museum. She serves as a liaison from the Teacher Advisory Council to the Center for Education’s Committee on Teacher Preparation Programs in the U.S. She has a B.S. in zoology and secondary education and M.A. and PhD. degrees in science education from the University of Iowa.


Chris Dede (Cochair) is the Timothy E. Wirth professor in learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His fields of scholarship include emerging technologies, policy, and leadership. His recent research projects include work with middle school students learning science via shared virtual environments and helping high school students



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Enhancing Professional Development for Teachers Potential Uses of Information Technology: Report of a Workshop Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Workshop Presenters COMMITTEE MEMBERS Lyn Le Countryman (Cochair) teaches eleventh grade biology and mentors undergraduate education majors at the Malcolm Price Laboratory School and teaches undergraduate biology and graduate-level science classes on the campus of the University of Northern Iowa. In 1994, she was one of the first teachers in the nation to gain national board certification as an early adolescent generalist. She has served as the president of the Iowa Science Teachers Section of the Iowa Academy of Science. She received the 1999 Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching and the 1998 Tandy Award for outstanding teaching. She is a founding member of the National Academies Teacher Advisory Council and also is a member of the Teacher Advisory Council Museum Associates for the Marian Koshland Science Museum. She serves as a liaison from the Teacher Advisory Council to the Center for Education’s Committee on Teacher Preparation Programs in the U.S. She has a B.S. in zoology and secondary education and M.A. and PhD. degrees in science education from the University of Iowa. Chris Dede (Cochair) is the Timothy E. Wirth professor in learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. His fields of scholarship include emerging technologies, policy, and leadership. His recent research projects include work with middle school students learning science via shared virtual environments and helping high school students

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Enhancing Professional Development for Teachers Potential Uses of Information Technology: Report of a Workshop with mathematics and literacy skills using wireless mobile devices to create augmented reality simulations. In 2007, he was honored by Harvard University as an outstanding teacher. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Committee on Foundations of Educational and Psychological Assessment and a member of the subcommittee on information technology for the Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems. He serves on advisory boards and commissions for Public Broadcasting’s TeacherLine, the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center, and several federal research grants. He is a member of the board of directors of the Boston Tech Academy, an experimental small high school in the Boston public school system. He was the editor of the 1998 Yearbook of the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Learning with Technology, and coeditor of Scaling Up Success: Lessons Learned from Technology-based Educational Innovation (Jossey-Bass, 2005). In September 2005 he led an invitational research conference on online teacher professional development; the conference volume, Online Professional Development for Teachers: Emerging Models and Methods, was published by the Harvard Education Press in 2006. He has an Ed.D. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Vinton Cerf is vice president and “chief Internet evangelist” for Google, Inc. In this role, he is responsible for identifying new enabling technologies to support the development of advanced Internet-based products and services from Google. Previously he was senior vice president of technology strategy for MCI and senior vice president of architecture and technology. He is the codesigner of the TCP/IP protocols and the architecture of the Internet, for which he was awarded the U.S. National Medal of Technology. He received the Alan M. Turing award in 2004. He served as founding president of the Internet Society from 1992 to 1995 and in 1999 served a term as chairman of the board. He was a member of the U.S. Presidential Information Technology Advisory Committee from 1997 to 2001 and serves on several national, state, and industry committees focused on cyber security. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Association for Computing Machinery, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the International Engineering Consortium, the Computer History Museum, and the National Academy of Engineering. He has a B.S. in mathematics from Stanford University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from the University of California, Los Angeles. Susan Doubler is associate professor of science education at Lesley University and codirector of the Center for Science Teaching and Learning

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Enhancing Professional Development for Teachers Potential Uses of Information Technology: Report of a Workshop at TERC in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her work focuses on the interface between science and technology with the aim of bringing together project-based science and technology (microcomputer-based labs, geographic visualizations) to further science learning in the K-12 classroom. This interest has led to work in online learning for teachers of science. She is the coprincipal investigator of the Fulcrum Leadership Institute, a math and science partnership involving Tufts University, TERC, and schools in the Boston area. She is also principal investigator and director of Reopening the Science Door, a project to develop and implement a fully online master’s program in science education for K-8 teachers. Before coming to TERC and Lesley University, she was an instructional specialist and teacher in the Winchester, Massachusetts, public schools. Beginning in 1997, TERC and Lesley University entered into a partnership to develop this fully accredited, online master’s degree program in science education. She has a B.S. from Bowling Green State University, an M.Ed. from Boston University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Liverpool. Janet English is currently on leave from her middle school teaching position to serve as director of educational services at KOCE-TV in Huntington Beach, California, and executive director of telecommunications of Orange County. She has taught at the Serrano Intermediate School, Lake Forest, California, for 13 years. She was an instructor for the Middle School Project as part of the California Institute of Technology’s Pre-College Science Initiative, the director of the Physics Camp and the Chemistry Camp under the aegis of the University of Northern Colorado’s Institute for Chemical Education, and an instructor during summers at the University of California, Los Angeles’s Apple Teacher Institute. From 2001 to 2005 she was the teacher trainer and K-12 coordinator for Schoolhouse Video (http://www.schoolhousevideo.org) for KOCE-TV. She is a founding member of the California Teacher Advisory Council and received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching for Secondary Science in 2003. She has a B.S. in biology from Middlebury College and an M.A. with a focus on middle grades education from California State University, San Bernardino. Javier Gonzalez is a mathematics teacher and department chair at Pioneer High School in Whittier, California. He is the creator of the Pioneer Math Academy, a six-week summer math program that serves over 700 students each year. The academy teaches principles of mathematics by means of students’ active participation in math-related projects, which, along with his other enrichment classes, are designed to foster students’ mastery and self-confidence in the subject. During the school year he also serves as a mentor teacher and the coordinator of Pioneer’s gifted and

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Enhancing Professional Development for Teachers Potential Uses of Information Technology: Report of a Workshop talented education program. In addition, he is the adviser to the Pioneer Leo Club, a program affiliated with the Lions Club that provides young people with opportunities for community service. His awards and honors include the 1996 State Teacher of the Year, the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Education, and the Milken Family Foundation award. He served on the National Commission on Mathematics and Science Teaching for the 21st Century. He is an original member of the National Academies Teacher Advisory Council and now serves as a member of the NRC’s Mathematical Sciences Education Board and the California Teacher Advisory Council. He has an M.A. in administrative leadership from Point Loma Nazarene College in San Diego. Tad Johnston is the mathematics specialist and regional representative to Washington County, Maine, for the Maine Department of Education. He works with Maine’s mathematics assessment program and numeracy initiative, providing technical assistance to schools, including designing professional development experiences and advising others in the areas of mathematics teaching and assessment. He serves on the boards of several educational organizations as a representative of the commissioner of education, helping them stay abreast of the changing education environment, providing technical advice on mathematics and science education issues, and linking these groups to the Department of Education and to Maine teachers. In his role as a state supervisor of mathematics, he also has been involved with curriculum efforts at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, especially their Explorer Schools mission. Johnston was a middle and high school teacher for 15 years, with an emphasis on mathematics and sciences. He received a Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics Teaching in 2000. He is a member of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the Association of State Supervisors of Mathematics, the board of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics in New England, and the Association of Teachers of Mathematics in Maine. He has a B.S. in both mathematics and elementary education from the University of Dallas and an M.Ed. in science education with an emphasis on mathematics-science integration from the University of Maine. Valdine McLean teaches physics, chemistry, and biology to students in grades 9-12 at Pershing County High School in Lovelock, Nevada. She also has been a student via online learning through Montana State University. She holds national board certification in the area of adolescent and young adult science since 2000 and was the National Teacher Training Institute’s Teacher of the Year in 1998. Understanding that science is not always easily accessible to students, she frequently develops cooperative projects with colleagues in art, industrial arts, English, and computer sci-

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Enhancing Professional Development for Teachers Potential Uses of Information Technology: Report of a Workshop ence. The “pumpkin catapult” activity that she leads every fall involves more than half of the student body at her school, as well as parents, business leaders, and others from throughout the community and the region. She designs hands-on projects to nurture skills in cooperation, teamwork, tolerance, and friendly competition. The first teacher in her school to use computers in her classroom, she has created a technology-rich environment that has proven particularly effective for English language learners and special needs students. Her awards include Pershing County Teacher of the Year, 2000; Nevada Teacher of the Year, 2001; the Horace Mann Teaching Excellence Award, 2001; and the NEA Foundation for Improving Education Teaching Excellence Award, 2001. She is a founding member of the National Academies Teacher Advisory Council. She has a B.S. in biology from Humboldt State University and an M.S. in science education from Montana State University. Barbara Treacy is a managing project director at the Center for Online Professional Education at the Education Development Center (EDC) in Newton, Massachusetts. She directs several online learning projects, including EdTech Leaders Online, a national capacity-building online professional development program for state departments of education, school districts, regional education service providers, and teacher training institutions, with participating organizations in over 35 states. Since the inception of EdTech Leaders Online in fall 2000, she has led teams of online specialists and curriculum developers to provide graduate-level training programs in online learning, a catalogue of over 25 online workshops in specific K-12 subject areas and grade levels, and a national forum for online specialists implementing local online programs. She also directs EDC’s participation in e-Learning for Educators, a large-scale, nine-state collaboration to establish statewide online professional development programs and conduct research on their impact on teachers and students. She has presented at numerous national, regional, and state conferences on online learning and is the coauthor of EdTech Leaders Online: Building Organizational Capacity to Provide Effective Online Professional Development. She has an A.B. from Harvard University and an M.Ed. in technology in education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. WORKSHOP PRESENTERS Bruce Alberts, past president of the National Academy of Sciences, is a professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of California, San Francisco. A biochemist recognized for his work both in biochemistry and molecular biology, he is noted for his extensive study of the protein complexes that allow chromosomes to be

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Enhancing Professional Development for Teachers Potential Uses of Information Technology: Report of a Workshop replicated, as required for a living cell to divide. He is one of the original authors of The Molecular Biology of the Cell, used widely in U.S. colleges and universities (5th edition, 2007). Alberts has long been committed to the improvement of science education, dedicating much of his time to such education projects as City Science, a program seeking to improve science teaching in San Francisco elementary schools. He has served on the advisory board of the National Science Resources Center, a joint project of the National Academy of Sciences and the Smithsonian Institution working with teachers, scientists, and school systems to improve teaching of science, as well as on the National Academy of Sciences’ National Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessment. He has a B.S. in biochemical sciences from Harvard College and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Hilda Borko is professor of education and chair of the educational psychology program area at the University of Colorado. Her research explores teacher cognition and the process of learning to teach, with an emphasis on changes in novice and experienced teachers’ knowledge and beliefs about teaching, learning, subject matter, and their classroom practices as they participate in reform-based teacher education and professional development programs. Her teaching interests are in the related areas of classroom processes, teaching for understanding, and teacher learning. She is a member of numerous professional organizations in education and psychology and has served as a member and chair of various committees for the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the Educational Psychology Division of the American Psychological Association. She was president of AERA in 2003-2004, editor of the teaching, learning, and human development section of the American Educational Research Journal, and interim editor (with Lorrie Shepard) of Educational Researcher. She is currently editor of the Journal of Teacher Education (with Dan Liston and Jennie Whitcomb). Linda Chaput is chief executive of Agile Mind, Inc. The company was founded in 2001, and, in collaboration with the Charles A. Dana Center at The University of Texas, and now Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, develops, disseminates, and continuously improves tools and resources designed to help teachers, schools, and districts improve access to—and achievement in—challenging college-preparatory mathematics and science. Linda has more than 20 years of experience in the development and dissemination of educational publications. She was president of Scientific American’s education, general, professional and reference publishing, as well as founder and chief executive of Cogito Learning Media, Inc. At Scientific American, she was the president and editorial director of W.H.

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Enhancing Professional Development for Teachers Potential Uses of Information Technology: Report of a Workshop Freeman and Company (a wholly owned subsidiary) and later president of Scientific American Medicine. During her tenure, she oversaw the publication of books in biology, psychology, chemistry, astronomy, mathematics, and statistics characterized by innovation, rigor, and commercial success. She oversaw the launch of the Scientific American Library, a series of illustrated books written by leading scientists for general readers. As president of Scientific American Medicine, she oversaw the launch of its multimedia and online professional services, now a part of WebMD. In 1995 Linda founded Cogito, a pioneering provider of top-quality multimedia and Internet-ready learning tools authored by authorities in science, mathematics, economics, and other critical competency subjects deliverable on a variety of platforms, including the Internet, CD-ROM, video, and print. Chris Dede [see the biography under Committee Members] Janet English [see the biography under Committee Members] Louis M. Gomez is professor of learning science and computer science at Northwestern University. He is an expert on technology and curriculum reform that allows students to create products and projects. His interests include curriculum design and systemic school reform; school and classroom organization support through technology; application of computing and networking technology to teaching and learning; applied cognitive science; and human-computer interaction. Over the past several years he has also pursued active research programs investigating techniques that improve the human use of information retrieval systems and techniques that aid in the acquisition of complex computer-based skills. He is chair of the Educational Testing Service’s Visiting Panel of Research and a recent recipient of the Spencer Foundation Mentorship Award. He has a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. Marcia Linn is professor in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley, and director of the campuswide Instructional Technology Program. She codirects the Visualization and Modeling theme team, leads the postdoctoral program of the Center for Integrative Learning Technologies (CILT), and coordinates the involvement of Berkeley’s Program in Education in Mathematics, Science, and Technology in the research and development and research training components of CILT. She conducts research on the teaching and learning of science and technology, gender equity, and the design of technological learning environments. In 1998 the Council of Scientific Society Presidents selected her for its first award for excellence in educational research. Other

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Enhancing Professional Development for Teachers Potential Uses of Information Technology: Report of a Workshop honors include an award for lifelong distinguished contributions to science education from the National Association for Research in Science Teaching in 1994, the Willystine Goodsell Award from the American Educational Research Association, and the Women Educator’s Research Award in 1982. She has served on the board of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Graduate Record Examination Board of the Educational Testing Service, and the McDonnell Foundation Cognitive Studies in Education Practice Board. She has a B.A. in psychology and statistics and a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Stanford University. Valdine McLean [see the biography under Committee Members] Leah K. O’Donnell is a senior member of Eduventures, an information services company that provides research and analysis to assist organizations in education markets to develop strategies, increase sales, and improve operational performance. Recently, she has identified acquisition opportunities in the postsecondary for-profit market, performed sustainability analyses, developed recommendations for grant-funded education products and services, and assessed the impact of digital media on postsecondary and K-12 markets. Previously, she was a senior consultant at a market research and brand consulting firm, where she managed engagements for clients in the consumer goods sector and focused on developing, executing, and analyzing consumer research, developing channel strategies for new product introductions, and conducting market assessments and competitive landscaping. She has a B.A. from Georgetown University and an M.B.A. from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth University. Liz Pape is chief executive of Virtual High School (VHS) in Maynard, Massachusetts, a pioneer in online learning for high school students and online course design for teachers. Under her management, VHS has grown from 28 member schools and 30 classes offered to over 400 member schools and 260 teachers in 29 states and 24 countries. She serves on the board of directors of the North American Council for Online Learning and has served on the U.S. Department of Education’s National Online Education Policy Forum and the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory’s Blue Ribbon Panel for Online Education. James Pence works at WGBH Educational Productions in Boston. Previously he was product management director at Pearson Achievement Solutions. He has 16 years of experience in the K-12 education sector, including as a high school teacher, a program officer at the National Geographic Education Foundation, an education consultant, and a mar-

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Enhancing Professional Development for Teachers Potential Uses of Information Technology: Report of a Workshop keter of professional development services. He has an M.B.A. from the University of California, Davis. Raymond Rose is cofounder and president of Rose & Smith Associates, a consulting group dedicated to sharing the principles of successful online learning and the innovative use of technology in education settings. Previously he was vice president of the Concord Consortium, a nonprofit educational research and development group that guides schools nationally and internationally to realize the educational promise of technology. He works with K-12, college and university programs, policy makers, and leaders of a diverse range of organizations and institutions, helping to shape the nature of e-learning efforts in the country. Andee Rubin is a senior scientist at TERC in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and has worked for over 25 years in the fields of mathematics and language arts education, focusing on the role of technology in both areas, on the evolution of students’ mathematical concepts, and on professional development in mathematics and technology for elementary teachers. She designed several pioneering pieces of educational software, including QUILL (writing environments for elementary school), ELASTIC (statistics software for high school), and CamMotion (digitized video tools for teaching advanced mathematical concepts.) Most recently, she was a major author of the K-5 mathematics curriculum Investigations in Number, Data, and Space, focusing on data analysis concepts. She developed professional development materials that accompany the curriculum and led national workshops that used these materials. In fall 1997, she was a math content guide for a series of nationally broadcast interactive teacher development workshops entitled What’s the Big Idea? At TERC, she is currently directing a project that is investigating educational computer games that teach math and are appealing to girls. She has S.M. and E.E. degrees in computer science and artificial intelligence from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Deborah Smith is a focus teacher at Woodcreek Elementary Magnet School for Science, Math and Technology in Lansing, Michigan. Previously she served as the director of the Curriculum Development Lab in the College of Education at the University of Delaware and was a co-principal investigator for science for the Delaware Statewide Systemic Initiative. She then served as organizer and facilitator of the Averill Elementary School Science Study Group, whose classrooms are featured in the Annenberg series “Shedding Light on Science.” She had a postdoctoral fellowship with the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. She is author and co-principal investigator for a project on teacher reten-

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Enhancing Professional Development for Teachers Potential Uses of Information Technology: Report of a Workshop tion and renewal. She has a B.A. in biology from Boston University, an M.A. in teaching science education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction (science education) from the University of Delaware. William (Bill) Thomas is director of educational technology for the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB). He provides leadership on educational technology issues and topics impacting K-12 and postsecondary schools and colleges in the 16-state region served by the board. Through his leadership, the SREB Educational Technology Cooperative, comprised of 37 K-12 and higher education state education agencies, was created and implemented over the past 11 years. Previously he served as coordinator of technology services, a classroom teacher, and a school administrator. He has also taught undergraduate and graduate courses and authored a series of papers on educational technology topics, including “Online Professional Development—Why SREB States Need It and Standards of Quality for Online Teaching.” He has served on numerous state, regional, and national committees and panels on a range of educational technology topics. David Zarowin is executive director of WIDE World (Wide-scale Interactive Development for Educators), an innovative professional development program based at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Previously he spent 15 years in various editorial, marketing, business development, and general management positions at Prentice Hall and its parent company, Pearson Education. Prior to his Pearson years, he was a labor and industrial historian for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, where he served on a team of historians and archaeologists who documented the history of several Massachusetts cities and towns for preservation planning purposes. He has a B.A. in philosophy and American literature from the State University of New York at Purchase and an M.A. in American studies from Boston University.

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