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Appendix F Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff RICHARD P. NATHAN (Chair) is codirector of the Rockefeller Institute and distinguished professor of political science and public policy at the State University of New York at Albany. He has written and edited books on the implementation of domestic public programs in the United States and on American federalism. Prior to going to Albany, he was a professor at Princeton University. He served in the federal government as assistant direc- tor of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, deputy undersecretary for welfare reform of the U.S. Department of Health Education and Wel- fare, and director of domestic policy for the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders (The Kerner Commission). He is a graduate of Brown University, and holds an M.P.A. and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. JOHN L. CZAJKA is a senior fellow at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. His work has focused on development of administrative data files, small-area estimation, census taking, policy analysis, and the evaluation of estimates obtained from survey data. He has also directed many studies of health insurance coverage, including analyses of the dynamics of coverage over time and the impact of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program on trends in children’s coverage. His work for the Internal Revenue Service has improved the practice of statistics at the Statistics of Income Division, one of the federal government’s major statistical agencies. His research for such clients as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Internal Revenue Service, and the Social Security Administration has been widely cited. He is a past president of the Washington Statistical Society and 162

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APPENDIX F 163 a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan. JOHN L. KNAPP is senior economist and professor emeritus in the Business and Economics Section of the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Services at the University of Virginia. He is a past chair of the Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics, and he served as president of the Asso- ciation for University Business and Economic Research and of the Virginia Association of Economists. His areas of expertise include economic devel- opment, forecasting, regional economics, and state and local government finance. Major projects under way are a study of local tax rates of Virginia cities, counties, and towns; a study describing and analyzing Virginia’s sub- state areas based primarily on the Regional Economic Information System of the Bureau of Economic Analysis; an article on Virginia’s controversial plan to reimburse localities for foregone personal property taxes on mo- tor vehicles; a study of the economic impact of the University of Virginia; and VaStat, a statistical resource maintained on the web. A graduate of the University of Colorado, Boulder, he has an M.A. from Duke University and a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. YOLANDA KODRZYCKI is senior economist and policy adviser at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. She specializes in regional, labor market, and public-sector economics. Her research has examined such topics as the long-term implications of job loss, migration patterns of college graduates, causes of regional differences in educational attainment, privatization of government functions, and corporate tax policy at the national and state levels. She serves as an adviser to numerous organizations with an inter- est in the New England and national economies, and she is coeditor of Massachusetts Benchmarks, an economics magazine issued jointly by the University of Massachusetts and the Boston Federal Reserve. A graduate of Radcliffe College (Harvard University), she has a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. CARYN E. KUEBLER (Associate Program Officer) is an associate program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. Prior to joining the com- mittee staff, she worked for the University of Chicago’s Cultural Policy Center on a nationally scaled research project measuring the relationship between the size and scope of a region’s creative sector and its economic growth potential. Her research interests include measuring consumer debt burden and income inequality, economic development, and cultural policy, including access to and protection of cultural and natural resources. She has a B.S. from Syracuse University and an M.P.P. from the University of Chicago.

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164 STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICS AT A CROSSROADS DAVID A. MARKER is a senior statistician and associate director of Westat with 24 years of experience in project management, quality control and improvement, survey research, sampling, survey evaluation, data analysis, imputation, modeling, and small-area statistics. Both the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program and the National Employer Health Insurance Survey, conducted by Westat, used the Census of Governments as one of the sam- pling frames. His primary field of study is survey sampling, both classical and Bayesian approaches. He has worked on studies in the area of quality control and improvement for the U.S. Department of Education, the En- ergy Information Administration, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He has also worked on studies in the fields of health, housing, energy, social services, and the environment, as well as in the commercial sector. He is a consultant in total quality management and has conducted training sessions for the Swedish, Norwegian, and Finnish governments on improving the quality of their data collection activities. He has also ap- peared as an expert witness before federal, state, and local governments. He has a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan. DAVID YOUNG MILLER is interim dean of the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and professor of public and urban affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. In this position, he has done work in compara- tive regional governance, urban public finance, research methods, law and politics of local government, and administrative theory. A frequent user of Census Bureau government statistics, he has developed metropolitan da- tasets based on census data. He has a Ph.D. in public policy research and analysis from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. ROBERT PARKER is a consultant on federal statistics and has served as chief statistician of the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), where he directed work on the operations of the federal statistical system and advised the staff on the use of statistics and statistical methodologies in the conduct of audits and evaluations of government programs and op- erations. Prior to joining GAO in July 2000, he was the chief statistician of the Bureau of Economic Analysis and associate director for national accounts and a member of the Statistics Canada National Accounts Ad- visory Committee. He is a member of the National Business Economics Issues Council and the Conference of Business Economists. He authors the “Focus on Statistics” articles in Business Economics, the quarterly journal of the National Association for Business Economics. He also serves as the association’s representative to the Council of Professional Associations for Federal Statistics.

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APPENDIX F 165 THOMAS J. PLEWES (Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. Previously he served as study director for the Panel to Review Research and Development Statistics at the National Science Foundation. Prior to joining the Committee on National Statistics staff, he was associate commissioner for employment and unemployment statistics of the Bureau of Labor Statistics and served as chief of the U.S. Army Reserve. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and was a member of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology. He has a B.A. in economics from Hope College and an M.A. in economics from the George Washington University. ROBERT P. STRAUSS is professor of economics and public policy at the J. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University. His general research interests include public economics, urban real estate assessment practices, and state and local taxation policy. He has served on the advisory boards of several federal statistical agencies, includ- ing the Statistics of Income Division of the Internal Revenue Service and the Governments Division of the Census Bureau. He served on the Revenue Estimating Advisory Committee of the Joint Committee on Taxation, U.S. Congress, and was assistant to the deputy secretary of the treasury. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin.

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