B
Statement of Task

At the request of the U.S. Army, the National Academies will conduct a study that will address the use of measurement in the testing of aerosol detectors. The U.S. Army's current requirements for evaluating aerosol detectors are stated in ACPLA or Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air. However, there is not an adequate mechanism for determining if equipment meets the standard. The Army seeks a standard unit of measure that can be used for biological material independent of the state of the material (aerosol or aerosol resuspended in liquid) and independent of agent type (bacteria, viruses, or toxins).

The study will specifically address the following questions:

  • Is there a single unit of measure that is appropriate for use in the evaluation of aerosol detectors?

  • What are the possible alternatives to the use of ACPLA and what are the advantages and disadvantages of their use?

  • Are different measures appropriate in different circumstances?

  • Is there a robust way to convert between various units of measure?



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OCR for page 79
B Statement of Task At the request of the U.S. Army, the National Academies will conduct a study that will address the use of measurement in the testing of aerosol detectors. The U.S. Army's current requirements for evaluating aerosol detectors are stated in ACPLA or Agent Containing Particles per Liter of Air. However, there is not an adequate mechanism for determining if equipment meets the standard. The Army seeks a standard unit of measure that can be used for biological material independent of the state of the material (aerosol or aerosol resuspended in liquid) and independent of agent type (bacteria, viruses, or toxins). The study will specifically address the following questions: • Is there a single unit of measure that is appropriate for use in the evaluation of aerosol detectors? • What are the possible alternatives to the use of ACPLA and what are the advantages and disadvantages of their use? • Are different measures appropriate in different circumstances? • Is there a robust way to convert between various units of measure? 79

OCR for page 79