C
Committee Member Biographies

J. Patrick Fitch (CHAIR), National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center

Dr. Fitch is laboratory director of NBACC and president of the Battelle National Biodefense Institute, LLC (BNBI). NBACC is managed and operated by BNBI as a federally funded research and development center for the Department of Homeland Security. Dr. Fitch has a background in genomics, bioengineering, and electrical engineering. He has also served as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) program leader for chemical and biological national security; division leader for engineering research, bioengineering, and genomics; and LLNL director of the Center for Healthcare Technologies. Dr. Fitch holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Purdue University and B.S. degrees in physics and engineering sciences from Loyola College. He chaired the National Research Council Committee on Review of Testing and Evaluation Methodology for Biological Point Detectors and served on the Committee for an Assessment of Naval Forces’ Defense Capabilities Against Chemical and Biological Warfare Threats and is a member of the Institute of Medicine Forum on Microbial Threats.


Mike Bray, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Dr. Bray is currently a medical officer in the Biodefense Clinical Research Branch, Division of Clinical Research, NIAID. He is a physician and virologist, and is board-certified in anatomic and forensic pathology, specializing in the control of hazardous viruses and defense against biological weapons. His expertise is in the area of virus research under BSL-2, -3, and -4 containment, and he is the author or coauthor of some 100 research papers and review articles in pathology, virology and biodefense. Dr. Bray received a bachelor of science degree from the University of Oregon, an M.D. degree with honors from Dartmouth Medical School, and an M.P.H. degree from Johns Hopkins University.


Yung-Sung Cheng, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute

Dr. Cheng is the director of the Aerosol and Respiratory Dosimetry Program and Inhalation Drug Delivery Center at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. Dr. Cheng is particularly interested in characteristics of airborne material that will influence its transport, collection, deposition, and retention in humans and environments. He has been heavily involved in the design and operation of high-quality systems for animal inhalation exposure studies. More recently he has been involved in design and evaluation of air sampling instruments for radioactive aerosol and biological agents and wind tunnel testing of air sampling instruments. He has published over 200 papers in the aerosol-related research areas. Dr. Cheng received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Syracuse University.



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C Committee Member Biographies J. Patrick Fitch (CHAIR), National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center Dr. Fitch is laboratory director of NBACC and president of the Battelle National Biodefense Institute, LLC (BNBI). NBACC is managed and operated by BNBI as a federally funded research and development center for the Department of Homeland Security. Dr. Fitch has a background in genomics, bioengineering, and electrical engineering. He has also served as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) program leader for chemical and biological national security; division leader for engineering research, bioengineering, and genomics; and LLNL director of the Center for Healthcare Technologies. Dr. Fitch holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Purdue University and B.S. degrees in physics and engineering sciences from Loyola College. He chaired the National Research Council Committee on Review of Testing and Evaluation Methodology for Biological Point Detectors and served on the Committee for an Assessment of Naval Forces’ Defense Capabilities Against Chemical and Biological Warfare Threats and is a member of the Institute of Medicine Forum on Microbial Threats. Mike Bray, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health Dr. Bray is currently a medical officer in the Biodefense Clinical Research Branch, Division of Clinical Research, NIAID. He is a physician and virologist, and is board-certified in anatomic and forensic pathology, specializing in the control of hazardous viruses and defense against biological weapons. His expertise is in the area of virus research under BSL-2, -3, and -4 containment, and he is the author or coauthor of some 100 research papers and review articles in pathology, virology and biodefense. Dr. Bray received a bachelor of science degree from the University of Oregon, an M.D. degree with honors from Dartmouth Medical School, and an M.P.H. degree from Johns Hopkins University. Yung-Sung Cheng, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Dr. Cheng is the director of the Aerosol and Respiratory Dosimetry Program and Inhalation Drug Delivery Center at Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. Dr. Cheng is particularly interested in characteristics of airborne material that will influence its transport, collection, deposition, and retention in humans and environments. He has been heavily involved in the design and operation of high-quality systems for animal inhalation exposure studies. More recently he has been involved in design and evaluation of air sampling instruments for radioactive aerosol and biological agents and wind tunnel testing of air sampling instruments. He has published over 200 papers in the aerosol-related research areas. Dr. Cheng received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Syracuse University. 81

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82 Kathryn L. Creek, Los Alamos National Laboratory Ms. Creek is currently program manager for L-3 Communications, Applied Technologies Division, where she focuses on the commercial development of decontamination technologies. Previously she was project leader and program manager of the Los Alamos National Security Applied Modern Physics Group. The goal of one of her current projects is to enhance and complement development of detection and analysis protocols by providing essential information on the background microbial populations in public settings. Over the period of a week environmental conditions were monitored, employing fluorescence based bioaerosol triggers, particle counters and sizers, and other standard sampling methods commonly used in environmental analysis of air quality. In addition to these standard methods of analysis, methods were used to provide for a more in-depth understanding of the biotriggers’ response to typical air contaminants present in public facilities. Ms. Creek has over 15 years of experience as an aerosol scientist and industrial hygienist. She received her M.S. in industrial hygiene from the University of Oklahoma. Jay Eversole, Naval Research Laboratory Dr. Eversole is currently a research physicist at the Optical Sciences Division of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Washington, DC, where he is head of the aerosol physics section primarily aimed at bioaerosol detection development. Dr. Eversole received his doctorate in physics in 1975 from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Following two years as a National Research Council postdoctoral fellow, he worked for the University of Dayton Research Institute as an on-site research scientist at the Astrophysics Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA, in the area of optical combustion diagnostic measurements, especially for aerosol-laden exhaust gasses. Dr. Eversole joined NRL in 1985, has co-authored over 50 refereed research journal articles on various aspects of the optical properties of particulate materials, and single liquid droplets. Richard C. Flagan, California Institute of Technology Dr. Flagan is the Irma and Ross McCollum/William H. Corcoran Professor of Chemical Engineering and Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. He also serves as the executive officer for the Department of Chemical Engineering. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1969, and his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from M.I.T. in 1973. He joined the Caltech faculty of Environmental Engineering Science in 1975. Since joining the faculty at Caltech, his research has focused on aerosols, beginning with the study of nanoparticle formation during pulverized coal combustion, and gradually migrating toward atmospheric aerosols and applications of methods of aerosol science to the development of new materials and nanoparticle-based microelectronic and photonic devices. To better accommodate the increasing chemical process component of his research, Dr. Flagan moved to the Department of Chemical Engineering in 1990. He continues research in both atmospheric aerosols and aerosol nanotechnology. Dr. Flagan has received a number of awards in honor of his work in these areas. He is an active member of the American Association for Aerosol Research, having served as its treasurer, president, and presently, as the editor in chief of its journal, Aerosol Science and Technology.

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83 Michael R. Kuhlman, Battelle National Biodefense Institute Dr. Kuhlman is director of the National Biological Threat Characterization Center of the Department of Homeland Security, National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center. Formerly he was manager of Battelle’s Aerosol and Process Technologies (APT) product line, a multidisciplinary technical expertise focused on problems associated with airborne hazards: their production, propagation, detection, and mitigation. In this position he manages over 100 research staff members, and is responsible for state-of-the-art aerosol research laboratories. Throughout most of his 25-year career with Battelle, Dr. Kuhlman has been responsible for the performance and technical oversight of research programs involving various aspects of aerosol science, ranging from the dynamics of aerosol particles to the generation, collection, and detection of biological aerosols. The applications of this work have ranged from nuclear safety to atmospheric chemistry to the technical assessment of various respirable hazards. Dr. Kulman received his Ph.D. in environmental science and engineering from the University of North Carolina. Stanley Maloy, San Diego State University Dr. Maloy is the dean of the College of Sciences and the director of the Center for Microbial Sciences at San Diego State University. He has extensive experience in the area of bacteria pathogenesis, particularly salmonella. Dr. Maloy obtained his Ph.D. in molecular biology and biochemistry from the University of California, Irvine. Gary Resnick, Los Alamos National Laboratory Dr. Resnick is the Bioscience Division leader at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is an internationally recognized scientist in the area of chemical and biological defense, with extensive leadership and management experience. His scientific and technical accomplishments encompass all aspects of research, development, and testing of chemical warfare agents and chemical and biological defense systems. In addition, he has been an active member of the interagency and international chemical and biological arms control communities. Previous positions held include: associate center director for chemical and biological (CB) defense, Center for Homeland Security at Los Alamos National Laboratory; director of CB Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency; director of research and technology, Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center; technical director, U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground, and staff scientist at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He holds a B.S. degree from Cornell University, an M.S. degree from Long Island University, and a Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Rhode Island.

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