Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Millard F. (Frank) Rose, Chair, is vice president for research and chief technical officer, Radiance Technologies, Inc. Prior to joining Radiance Technologies, he was director of the Science Directorate at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Previous positions within the scientific community were the following: deputy director, Space Sciences Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; director, Space Power Institute, and professor, electrical engineering, Auburn University; and senior research scientist, Naval Surface Warfare Center. He has had a distinguished career involving progressively more responsible experience in performing and managing basic and applied research in the physical sciences and advanced technologies associated with space, shock wave physics, energy conversion, electronic warfare, directed energy technology, and space power technology. He has broad experience in planning, programming, coordinating, and implementing interdisciplinary R&D programs and received international recognition in the field of advanced power technology and space environmental effects. He is one of the few investigators who have published in the field of vector inversion generators. He is a fellow of the IEEE, an associate fellow of the AIAA, and a national associate of the National Academies. He was associate editor of the Journal of Propulsion and Power for 6 years and has been guest editor for several technical journals. He is the author/editor of five books, most dealing with high-power, high-speed phenomena; is the author of 160 technical papers in the open literature; and holds 12 patents, mostly in the area of advanced energy conversion. He is a past member of the NRC Board on Army Science and Technology and in that capacity participated in numerous BAST studies. He is a past member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Sandia National Laboratories. Dr. Rose holds a certificate in electrical engineering from the Clinch Valley



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 11
Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members millard F. (Frank) rose, Chair, is vice president for research and chief techni- cal officer, Radiance Technologies, Inc. Prior to joining Radiance Technologies, he was director of the Science Directorate at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Previous positions within the scientific community were the following: deputy director, Space Sciences Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; director, Space Power Institute, and professor, electrical engineering, Auburn University; and senior research scientist, Naval Surface Warfare Center. He has had a distinguished career involving progressively more responsible experience in performing and managing basic and applied research in the physical sciences and advanced technologies associated with space, shock wave physics, energy conversion, electronic warfare, directed energy technology, and space power technology. He has broad experience in planning, programming, coordinating, and implementing interdisciplinary R&D programs and received international recognition in the field of advanced power technology and space environmental effects. He is one of the few investigators who have published in the field of vector inversion generators. He is a fellow of the IEEE, an associate fellow of the AIAA, and a national associate of the National Academies. He was associate editor of the Journal of Propulsion and Power for 6 years and has been guest editor for several technical journals. He is the author/editor of five books, most dealing with high-power, high-speed phenomena; is the author of 160 technical papers in the open literature; and holds 12 patents, mostly in the area of advanced energy conversion. He is a past member of the NRC Board on Army Science and Technology and in that capacity participated in numerous BAST studies. He is a past member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Sandia National Laborato- ries. Dr. Rose holds a certificate in electrical engineering from the Clinch Valley 

OCR for page 11
 APPENDIX A College of the University of Virginia, a B.A. in physics from the University of Virginia, an M.Sc. in engineering physics, and a Ph.D. in engineering physics from Pennsylvania State University. rettig P. Benedict, Jr., is the current chairman of the Schafer Corporation board of directors. He is also the vice president for special programs and is responsible for business development and fulfillment in a wide range of programs relating to space capabilities and directed energy technologies with prime contractors and directly with the government. Dr. Benedict serves on several government advi- sory groups, including the ABL independent review team. Last year he was the study director for the AFRL Defensive Counterspace Study. He has also served on an NRC committee that studied directed energy testing. Dr. Benedict is on the board of directors of the Directed Energy Professional Society and serves as the treasurer. Prior to joining Schafer, Dr. Benedict was director, Space Defense and Surveillance, DCS Plans, Air Force Space Command in Colorado Springs, Colorado, from 1984 to 1988. In this capacity, Dr. Benedict was responsible for requirements development and advocacy, acquisition management, and imple- mentation of all aspects of space surveillance and space defense. He developed ASAT requirements and established the ASAT force mix concept. He managed the Space-Based Radar requirements development, Ballistic Missile Defense planning activities, and participated in TENCAP planning. He was responsible for Space Defense Operations Center (SPADOC) upgrades in Cheyenne Moun- tain. Dr. Benedict was a key participant in Strategic Defense Architecture 2000 and Project Forecast II and an advisor to the Air Force Science Advisory Board. From 1979 to 1984, Dr. Benedict was assigned to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) as program manager of the Short Wavelength Laser Program. Dr. Benedict managed and technically directed broad programs focused on developing laser and beam control technologies for three DOD missions: Sub- marine Laser Communications (blue-green lasers); Ground-Based Laser ASAT; and Ballistic Missile Defense. He managed the evolution of high-energy electron beam pumped excimer lasers; free electron lasers; long-life, high-repetition-rate discharge pumped excimer lasers; early diode pumped solid-state lasers; and advanced atmospheric compensation technologies. Many of these programs were transferred to SDIO in 1984, where the research continued. Dr. Benedict holds a Ph.D. in physics from the Air Force Institute of Technology. robert l. Byer, Nae and Nas, is currently a professor of applied physics at Stanford University and has conducted research and taught classes in lasers and nonlinear optics there since 1969. He has made numerous contributions to laser science and technology, including the demonstration of the first tunable visible parametric oscillator, the development of the Q-switched unstable resonator Nd:YAG laser, remote sensing using tunable infrared sources, and precision spectroscopy using coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS). His current

OCR for page 11
 APPENDIX A research includes the development of nonlinear optical materials and laser diode pumped solid-state laser sources for applications to gravitational wave detection and to laser particle acceleration. Dr. Byer is a fellow of the Optical Society of America, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Laser Institute of America. In 1985, Dr. Byer served as president of the IEEE Lasers and Electro-optics Society. He was elected president of the Optical Society of America and served in 1994. He is a founding member of the California Council on Science and Technology and served as chair from 1995 to 1999. He has served on the Engineering Advisory Board of the National Science Foundation. At Stanford University, he was chair of the Applied Physics Depart- ment from 1981 to 1984 and from 1999 to 2002; associate dean of humanities and sciences from 1985 to 1987; vice provost and dean of research from 1987 through 1992; and director of the Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory from 1993 to 2006. He is currently the co-director of the Stanford Photonics Research Center and the director of the Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory at Stanford. He served on the AFSAB from 2002 to 2004. He is a member of the National Igni- tion Facility advisory committee at LLNL, a member of the scientific advisory committee for the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC, and a past chair of the external advisory board for the Center for Adaptive Optics, Santa Cruz. Dr. Byer was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1987 and to the National Academy of Sciences in 2000. Gregory h. canavan is a senior fellow and scientific adviser at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is also a fellow of the American Physical Society. His current research includes stochastic processes, data mining, and missile defense. Dr. Canavan is a member of the Missile Defense Agency advisory committee and the Army Science Board and has participated on several science boards and groups, including the USNORTHCOM Independent Strategic Assessment Group (ISAG), the U.S. Air Force Space Command Independent Strategic Assessment Group, the Defense Science Board Task Force on Missile Defense, the New York City Mayor’s Commission on Counter Terrorism, the International Space Station Independent Cost and Management Evaluation Commission, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Canavan has consulted on a number of panels, including these: the DARPA Directed Energy Panel, the De- fense Threat Reduction Agency Graybeard Panel, the Missile Defense Agency Se- nior Advisory Group, the Defense Policy Board, the NASA Earth Systems Science and Applications Advisory Committee, the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Global Climate Research, and the White House Science Council Military Panel. He has held previous positions as director, Office of Inertial Fusion, Department of Energy; special assistant to the Chief of Staff, U.S. Air Force; White House Fellow; Office of Energy Policy and Planning program manager; and is a retired colonel in the U.S. Air Force.

OCR for page 11
4 APPENDIX A Dr. Canavan holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in applied science from the University of California, Davis; an M.B.A. from Auburn University; and a B.S. in mathematics from the U.S. Air Force Academy. alan h. epstein, Nae, is currently the R.C. Maclaurin Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the director of the Gas Turbine Laboratory at the Massachu- setts Institute of Technology. His responsibilities include teaching and research in propulsion, power production, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, flow diagnostics, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). He has been an active consultant to industry and government for more than 30 years, during which his activities included gas turbine design, system testing and advanced instrumentation, power systems, military infrared systems, and vehicle observable technology. He has won several international awards for heat transfer, turbomachinery, instrumenta- tion and controls, and gas turbine technology. He is a member of the NRC Board on Army Science and Technology and the NRC Standing Committee on Technol- ogy Insight-Gauge, Evaluate and Review (TIGER). He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in aeronautics and astronautics. alec d. Gallimore is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Michigan, where he directs the Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory. Professor Gallimore is also an associate dean of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, where he oversees the graduate portfolio of 30 departments in engineering, the physical sciences, and mathe- matics. Professor Gallimore is also on the faculty of the applied physics program at the University of Michigan, is the director of the NASA-funded Michigan Space Grant Consortium, and is project director of the NSF-funded Michigan AGEP Alliance. He received his B.S. in aeronautical engineering from Rensselaer Poly- technic Institute and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering from Princeton University. His primary research interests include electric propulsion, plasma diagnostics, space/reentry plasma simulation, and nanoparticle physics. He has experience with a wide array of electric propulsion technologies, includ- ing Hall thrusters, ion engines, arcjets, and MPD thrusters, and has implemented a variety of probe, microwave, and optical/laser plasma diagnostics. The author of nearly 200 journal and conference papers on electric propulsion and plasma physics, Professor Gallimore has been the recipient of a number of University of Michigan prizes, including the Trudy Huebner Service Excellence Award in 2005, the Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award in 2005, and the Outstand- ing Accomplishment Award in Aerospace Engineering in 2002. He received the Best Paper in Electric Propulsion Award for work presented at the 1998 Joint Propulsion Conference and the Outstanding Achievement in Academia Award from the National GEM Consortium in 2004. Professor Gallimore has graduated

OCR for page 11
5 APPENDIX A 17 Ph.D. students and 11 M.S. students. He serves on the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Electric Propulsion Technical Committee and is an associate fellow of AIAA. Professor Gallimore is an associate editor for the Journal of Propulsion and Power and has served on a number of advisory boards for NASA and the Department of Defense, including the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (AFSAB). He was awarded the Decoration for Meritorious Civilian Service in 2005 for his work on the AFSAB. He is cofounder and CEO of ElectroDynamic Applications, Inc., a small, high-tech aerospace firm in Ann Arbor, Michigan, that specializes in electric propulsion. Narain G. hingorani, Nae, is an independent consultant who retired from EPRI following a 20-year career, including the last 5 years as vice president of electrical systems. Prior to joining EPRI, Dr. Hingorani spent 6 years at Bonneville Power Administration; his responsibilities included the commissioning of the Pacific HVDC Intertie and Series Capacitor compensation. He has helped many utilities in the specifying, purchasing, and commissioning of HVDC and the application of power electronics. At present, Dr. Hingorani provides consulting services to ONR, DARPA, and utilities in the area of development and application of power electronics and devices for transmission, distribution, industrial power, and marine power systems. Dr. Hingorani is credited with originating the concepts of flex- ible AC transmission system (FACTS) and custom power, which are expected to revolutionize future AC power transmission and distribution systems, respectively. He has authored over 150 papers and articles on HVDC and AC transmission and co-authored two books, one on HVDC power transmission (1960) and the other on flexible AC power transmission (1999). Dr. Hingorani received a B.Sc. degree in electrical engineering from Baroda University in India and M.Sc., Ph.D., and Doc- tor of Science degrees from the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology in England. In 1985, Dr. Hingorani received the Uno Lamm Award of the IEEE Power Engineering Society for outstanding contributions in high- voltage, direct current technology; in 1995, he received the 1995 IEEE Lamme Gold Medal for leadership and pioneering contributions to the transmission and distribution of electric power, and in 2005 received the Benjamin Franklin Insti- tute Bower award and prize for achievement in science. In 2004, the IEEE Power Engineering Society decided to name its FACTS and Custom Power Awards the Nari Hingorani FACTS Award and the Nari Hingorani Custom Power Award, in recognition of Dr. Hingorani’s pioneering work in these technologies. He is a life fellow of IEEE. In 1988, Dr. Hingorani was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. From 1988 to 1996, he was chairman of CIGRE Study Committee 14: DC Links and Power Electronics. From 1998 to 2004, he was a member of the IEEE Foundation Board. From 2002 to 2006 he served on the NRC Panel on Sensors and Electron Devices, which reviewed the Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate (SEDD) of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL).

OCR for page 11
 APPENDIX A carol livermore is currently the SMA Assistant Professor of Manufacturing in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology. Prior to joining that department, she was a research scientist in the Micro- systems Technology Laboratories at MIT. Her present activities include teaching and research in the areas of mechanics, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and manufacturing techniques for micro- and nanoscale systems. Dr. Livermore’s past and present research areas include high-power MEMS for portable power applications, high-efficiency chemical lasers based on MEMS components, self- assembly technologies for micro- and nanoscale systems, and quantum devices. Dr. Livermore was the technical program co-chair for ARL’s 2003 Annual Sym- posium of the Collaborative Technology Alliances Power and Energy Program and served on the Technical Program Committee for PowerMEMS 2006. Professor Livermore received an NSF Career Award in 2007 and has over 25 publications in the fields of nanoelectronics, self-assembly, and the design and fabrication of MEMS. She holds an A.M. and a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University and a B.S. in physics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. madeleine l. Naudeau is a senior member of the technical staff at Sandia Na- tional Laboratories, where she is part of the Directed Energy Laser Applications group. Her current work includes investigations into the nonlinear interactions of high-intensity lasers with a variety of materials (solids and air) for several programs of national interest. Dr. Naudeau received a Ph.D. in physics in 2002 from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, where she worked at the Center for Ultrafast Optical Science. For her thesis work she studied wavepacket behavior in atomic and excitonic systems using ultrashort-pulse laser (USPL) systems. Upon graduation, she joined the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Crane, Indiana, and was instrumental in initiating a program to develop new technology using novel lasers for countermeasures against MANPADS and similar threats. George W. sutton, Nae, graduated from the California Institute of Technol- ogy with a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and physics. He currently works for SPARTA, Inc., where he has been instrumental in providing guidance for and reviews of new concepts for ballistic missile defense and the initiation of advanced systems for advanced sensors and weapons for ballistic missile defense. He is also a member of the laser technology team. Prior to joining SPARTA, Inc., Dr. Sutton was a principal engineer with ANSER (a not-for-profit corporation), where he was a member of the SETA team for BMDO for interceptor technol- ogy and high-energy lasers. He performed and published original analyses of aero-optical performance of externally cooled windows, uncooled optical dome and window thermal radiance, stresses, and optical aberrations; discrimination capability of one-, two-, and three-color passive optical and laser measurements; interceptor testbed flight test planning; testing techniques for image-motion com- pensation for strap-down seekers; performance of various infrared imagers for

OCR for page 11
 APPENDIX A target acquisition; and supported the space-based laser project. From 1992 to 1996, he was director of the Washington office and chief scientist for Aero Thermo Technology, Inc. Dr. Sutton was a member of the SETA team for BMDO theater ballistic missile interceptor technology, concentrating on aerothermochemistry, aero-optics, and structures for BMDO hit-to-kill ballistic missile interceptors. He wrote original interceptor flyout computer programs for window heating, window emission noise, and target signal-to-noise ratio. He also wrote original computer program for end-game guidance and control to determine seeker resolution and accuracy effect on miss distance. Before that he worked at the Avco-Everett Research Laboratory on gasdynamic lasers (a name he coined), electric carbon dioxide lasers, and excimer lasers. Dr. Sutton modeled laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence with molecular absorption and fog/clouds. He also modeled the distortion of laser mirrors due to absorbed irradiance and mod- eled and performed experiments on material damage. He performed laser systems studies and wavelength optimization, including propagation and threat lethality using statistics on atmospheric turbulence, absorption, and fog. Prior to that, he worked at Helionetics on excimer and blue-green lasers for communications. In addition to the Ph.D., Dr. Sutton holds a B.M.E. in mechanical and administra- tive engineering from Cornell University. He also completed postdoctoral courses in supersonic aerodynamics, boundary layers, turbulence, plasma physics, and program management. carson W. Taylor, Nae, is retired from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), which he joined in 1969 after earning degrees from the University of Wisconsin and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. His interests include power system control and protection, system dynamic performance, ac/dc interactions, and power system operations and planning. He retired from BPA in January 2006 as a principal engineer in transmission operations and planning. He consults and has instructed and led many industry short courses. Mr. Taylor is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is a fellow of the IEEE and past chairman of the IEEE Power System Stability Controls Subcommittee. He is a convenor of three CIGRÉ task forces on power system voltage and angle stability. He is the author of the book Power System Voltage Stability (McGraw-Hill). The book is translated into Chinese. Mr. Taylor has authored or co-authored many IEEE and CIGRÉ papers. michael d. Williams is an associate professor in the Department of Physics and director of the Center of Excellence in Microelectronics and Photonics at Clark Atlanta University. He received his Ph.D. degree in physics from Stanford University in 1987. His research interest is the effects of growth morphology and interfacial strain on the electronic band structure and stoichiometry of epitaxially grown, compound semiconductors using surface-sensitive techniques such as UPS and SIMS. In particular, he has explored the mechanisms responsible for

OCR for page 11
8 APPENDIX A the segregation of indium in indium-based alloys and their subsequent effect on the performance of integrated optoelectronic device structures. He has exploited advances in microfabrication techniques to design and fabricate novel micro- electronic and photonic device structures such as the negative electron affinity vacuum transistor and the freestanding quantum well. The latter structure consists of a quantum well confined on both sides by air or vacuum. It is ideal for prob- ing the local properties of solids, e.g., the interaction of quantum confined states with surface or interface states. Dr. Williams is a former member of the technical staff in the Optoelectronics Research Department at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, New Jersey. He joined AT&T in 1987 after completing an appointment as a visiting scientist at IBM’s Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California. Dr. Williams joined the faculty of Clark Atlanta University in 1994. He has pub- lished more than 65 papers and has four patents. He is an active life member of the American Physical Society. He has chaired the APS Committee on Minorities, organized and chaired a special session for the Committee on Minorities, and served on the Nominating Committee for DMP. Dr. Williams is also a member of the AVS (formerly the American Vacuum Society) and the National Society of Black Physicists.