Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

HELEN M. INGRAM (Chair) is research fellow at the Southwest Center at the University of Arizona and a professor emeritus at both the University of California at Irvine and the University of Arizona. She is on the advisory committee of the Rosenberg Forum on International Water Policy and also chairs the writing committee for a Climate Change Science Program on decision support experiments and evaluations using seasonal to interannual forecasts and observational data. Her published works include numerous books and articles on public policy, policy design, water policy, environmental policy, and the politics of water in the Southwestern United States and the U.S.-Mexico transboundary area. She holds a B.A. degree in government from Oberlin College and a Ph.D. degree in public law and government from Columbia University.


HOLLY GREENING is a senior scientist with the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP), with responsibility for coordinating bay research projects and overseeing the technical advisory committee. She has also supervised development of TBEP’s habitat restoration strategy and coordinated research linking seagrass light requirements and water clarity as the basis for setting nitrogen loading goals for Tampa Bay. Previously, she served as a scientist for several universities and consulting firms, conducting research in freshwater and estuarine ecology and acid rain and working on water quality and biological studies in South Carolina, Mississippi, and the Chesapeake Bay. She holds an M.S. degree in biology from Florida State University.



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Research and Networks for Decision Support: In the NOAA Sectoral Applications Research Program Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff HELEN M. INGRAM (Chair) is research fellow at the Southwest Center at the University of Arizona and a professor emeritus at both the University of California at Irvine and the University of Arizona. She is on the advisory committee of the Rosenberg Forum on International Water Policy and also chairs the writing committee for a Climate Change Science Program on decision support experiments and evaluations using seasonal to interannual forecasts and observational data. Her published works include numerous books and articles on public policy, policy design, water policy, environmental policy, and the politics of water in the Southwestern United States and the U.S.-Mexico transboundary area. She holds a B.A. degree in government from Oberlin College and a Ph.D. degree in public law and government from Columbia University. HOLLY GREENING is a senior scientist with the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP), with responsibility for coordinating bay research projects and overseeing the technical advisory committee. She has also supervised development of TBEP’s habitat restoration strategy and coordinated research linking seagrass light requirements and water clarity as the basis for setting nitrogen loading goals for Tampa Bay. Previously, she served as a scientist for several universities and consulting firms, conducting research in freshwater and estuarine ecology and acid rain and working on water quality and biological studies in South Carolina, Mississippi, and the Chesapeake Bay. She holds an M.S. degree in biology from Florida State University.

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Research and Networks for Decision Support: In the NOAA Sectoral Applications Research Program DENISE LACH is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Oregon State University. Her research interests include examination of changing roles and expectations for science and scientists in natural resource decision making, acceptability of bioremediation technology for cleanup of radionuclides and heavy metals, and institutional resistance to change, including the nonuse of climate forecasts by water managers. She holds a B.S. degree in English and education from the University of Minnesota and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Oregon. PHILIP MOTE is an affiliate professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences and a research scientist and public information officer for the Climate Impacts Group at the University of Washington. He also serves as a consultant at NorthWest Research Associates and as the state climatologist of the state of Washington. He conducts research on the connections between climate variability and natural resources, specializing in the dynamics of the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. He was a major participant and coauthor of several chapters in an integrated assessment of climate impacts on the Pacific Northwest. He holds a B.A. degree in physics from Harvard University and a Ph.D. degree in atmospheric sciences from the University of Washington. LAURENCE J. O’TOOLE, JR., is the Margaret Hughes and Robert T. Golembiewski professor of public administration and head of the Department of Public Administration and Policy at the University of Georgia. He is president of the Public Management Research Association and coeditor for public management of the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management. He is author, coauthor, or editor of numerous books and articles. His research interests focus on issues of policy implementation in complex institutional settings, including work on water policy; the impact of public management on government performance, policy implementation, intergovernmental, and interorganizational relations; and environmental and educational policy and management. He received a B.S. degree in chemistry from Clarkson University and M.P.A. and Ph.D. degrees in public administration from Syracuse University. PAMELA POGUE works for the Rhode Island Emergency Management Agency as the state national insurance floodplain program manager, the state earthquake program manager, and the state hurricane program manager. She also serves as chair of the board of directors of the Association of State Floodplain Managers. She previously served as president of Mitigation Planning & Consulting, LLC, a consulting company that assists companies, communities, and state and federal agencies in hazard mitigation

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Research and Networks for Decision Support: In the NOAA Sectoral Applications Research Program planning; as a marine research associate at the University of Rhode Island; and as a town planner in East Greenwich, Rhode Island. She has organized workshops on coastal zone management in Hawaii and Alabama. She holds a B.A. degree in government and economics from Georgetown University and an M.A. degree in oceanography and marine affairs from the University of Rhode Island. EUGENE A. ROSA is the Edward R. Meyer distinguished professor of natural resource and environmental policy in the Thomas S. Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service at Washington State University. He is also professor of sociology, affiliated professor of fine arts, affiliated professor of environmental science, and affiliated professor in the Center for Environmental Research, Education, and Outreach; faculty associate in the Social and Economic Sciences Research Center; and faculty associate in the Center for Integrated Biotechnology. His research has focused on technological risk and global environmental change. He has published many articles in scientific and social science journals and is coauthor of Risk, Uncertainty, and Rational Action, coeditor of Public Reactions to Nuclear Power: Are There Critical Masses? and Public Reactions to Nuclear Waste: Citizens’ Views of Repository Siting. He holds a B.S. degree from the Rochester Institute of Technology and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in social science from Syracuse University. PAUL C. STERN is a principal staff officer at the National Research Council and director of its standing Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. His research interests include the determinants of environmentally significant behavior, participatory processes for informing environmental decision making, and the governance of environmental resources and risks. He is coauthor of the textbook Environmental Problems and Human Behavior and coeditor of numerous National Research Council publications, including Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Priorities (2005), The Drama of the Commons (2002), Making Climate Forecasts Matter (1999), and Understanding Risk (1996). His coauthored Science article, “The Struggle to Govern the Commons,” won the 2005 Sustainability Science Award from the Ecological Society of America. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association. He holds a B.A. degree from Amherst College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Clark University, all in psychology.

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