APPENDIX D
AEGL Values for Selected Metal Phosphides
Aluminum Phosphide (AlP)
Potassium Phosphide (K3P)
Sodium Phosphide (Na3P)
Zinc Phosphide (Zn3P2)
Calcium Phosphide (Ca3P2)
Magnesium Phosphide (Mg3P2)
Strontium Phosphide (Sr3P2)
Magnesium Aluminum Phosphide (Mg3AlP3)

SUMMARY

Metal phosphides are solids and are typically used as fumigants against insects and rodents in stored grain. The metal phosphides react rapidly with water and moisture in the air or stored grain to produce phosphine gas. It is the phosphine gas that is responsible for acute toxicity, and the rate of phosphine generation is dependent on ambient temperature and humidity and the chemical structure of the phosphide (Anger et al. 2000).

In the absence of appropriate chemical-specific data for the metal phosphides considered in this appendix, the AEGL-2 and AEGL-3 values for phosphine were used to obtain AEGL-2 and AEGL-3 values, respectively, for the metal phosphides. The use of phosphine as a surrogate for the metal phosphides is deemed appropriate because qualitative (clinical signs) and quantitative (phosphine blood level) data suggest that the phosphine hydrolysis product is responsible for acute toxicity from metal phosphides. The phosphine AEGL-2 and AEGL-3 values were used as target values for calculating the concentrations of metal phosphide needed to generate the phosphine AEGL values.

Because AEGL-1 values for phosphine are not recommended (due to insufficient data), AEGL-1 values for the metal phosphides considered in this appendix are also not recommended. The calculated values are listed in Table D-1 below.

D.I.
INTRODUCTION

Metal phosphides are solids and are typically used as fumigants against insects and rodents in stored grain. The metal phosphides react rapidly with water and moisture in the air or stored grain to produce phosphine gas. It is the phosphine gas which is responsible for acute toxicity, and the rate of phosphine generation is dependent on ambient temperature and humidity and the chemical structure of the phosphide (Anger et al. 2000).



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