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Contributors

Carina Maria Alles leads Engineering Evaluations and Sustainability at DuPont Engineering Research and Technology in Wilmington, Delaware. Her team of corporate technical consultants evaluates novel products and processes with regard to technical feasibility, economic merit, environmental footprint, and societal benefit in support of DuPont’s strategic technology, research, and business decisions. Previously, she was a research fellow at the Universität Karlsruhe in Germany and a visiting scientist at the University of Houston and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Dr. Alles holds a doctorate in chemical engineering from the Universität Karlsruhe, with graduate-level training in process engineering, environmental engineering, and biotechnology in Germany, France, Switzerland, and the United States.


Jess C. Brown is manager of the Carollo Engineers Research Group, where he leads Carollo Engineers’ biological drinking water treatment program. He specializes in drinking water processes and applied research and has extensive experience with analytical chemistry, water-quality testing methods, and process selection. He has performed bench-, pilot-, and full-scale studies covering conventional treatment to advanced processes. Dr. Brown is a member of the American Water Works Association (AWWA) for which he chairs the Inorganic Contaminants Research Committee. He is also a member of the Florida section of the AWWA Biological Contaminants Committee, the International Water Association, and the Water Environment Federation. He received a B.A. in environmental science



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Contributors Carina Maria Alles leads Engineering Evaluations and Sustainability at DuPont Engineering Research and Technology in Wilmington, Delaware. Her team of corporate technical consultants evaluates novel products and processes with regard to technical feasibility, economic merit, environmental footprint, and soci- etal benefit in support of DuPont’s strategic technology, research, and business decisions. Previously, she was a research fellow at the Universität Karlsruhe in Germany and a visiting scientist at the University of Houston and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Dr. Alles holds a doctorate in chemical engineering from the Universität Karlsruhe, with graduate-level training in process engineering, environmental engineering, and biotechnology in Germany, France, Switzerland, and the United States. Jess C. Brown is manager of the Carollo Engineers Research Group, where he leads Carollo Engineers’ biological drinking water treatment program. He special- izes in drinking water processes and applied research and has extensive experience with analytical chemistry, water-quality testing methods, and process selection. He has performed bench-, pilot-, and full-scale studies covering conventional treatment to advanced processes. Dr. Brown is a member of the American Water Works Association (AWWA) for which he chairs the Inorganic Contaminants Research Committee. He is also a member of the Florida section of the AWWA Biological Contaminants Committee, the International Water Association, and the Water Environment Federation. He received a B.A. in environmental science 175

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176 FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING and public policy from Harvard University, and a B.S. in civil engineering and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Amy E. Childress is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Envi- ronmental Engineering and director of the Environmental Engineering Program at the University of Nevada, Reno. In 2004, she was a visiting associate professor at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. Dr. Childress teaches an undergraduate introductory course in environmental engineering and graduate courses in physical and chemical processes in water and wastewater treatment and colloidal and interfacial processes. Her research focuses on membrane con- tactor processes, pressure-driven membrane processes, and membrane bioreactor technology. Dr. Childress is president-elect of the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors and serves on the advisory board of Desali- nation. She is also a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Chemical Society, the American Water Works Association, and the North American Membrane Society. She was recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER Award in 2001. She received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1993 and 1997, respectively. Bruce S. Dien is a biochemical engineer with the U.S. Department of Agricul- ture’s National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research in Peoria, Illinois. In this position, he conducts process development for conversion of corn fibrous streams from the corn milling industry into ethanol. He has served on several multi-instructional research projects in this regard with other federal laborato- ries, as well as with industrial and academic partners. Dr. Dien is also part of an interdisciplinary team that developed microorganisms for converting sugars mixtures to ethanol or lactic acid at yields greater than 90 percent of theoretical. He received a B.S. in food process engineering and in biochemistry from Purdue University (1988) and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Minnesota (1994). Edward W. Felten is a professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University and is the founding director of Princeton’s Center for Infor- mation Technology Policy. His research interests include computer security and privacy, especially relating to media and consumer products, and technology law and policy. He has published about 80 papers in the research literature and two books. His research on topics such as web security, copyright and copy protec- tion, and electronic voting has been covered extensively in the popular press. Dr. Felten’s weblog at is widely read for its commentary on technology, law, and policy. He was the lead computer science expert witness for the U.S. Department of Justice in the Microsoft antitrust case,

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CONTRIBUTORS 177 and he has testified in other important lawsuits. He has testified before the Senate Commerce Committee on digital television technology and regulation and before the House Administration Committee on electronic voting. In 2004, Scientific American magazine named him to its list of 50 worldwide science and technology leaders. He received a B.S. in physics from the California Institute of Technology (1985), and an M.S. (1991) and a Ph.D. (1993) in computer science and engineer- ing from the University of Washington. Kevin A. Gluck is a senior research psychologist at the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Mesa (Arizona) Research Site, where he is the team lead for the Performance and Learning Models (PALM) research team. The team’s mission is to improve scientific understanding of human perceptual, cognitive, and motor processes by conducting empirical research and creating computational and mathematical models of results and phenomena of interest. Current research areas include spatial competence, the effects of fatigue on cognition, language-enabled synthetic entities, the micro-dynamics of learning and forgetting, and the develop- ment of large-scale computational infrastructures that enable faster scientific prog- ress in cognitive science. Applications of interest include synthetic teammates, pedagogical agents, and analysis tools for performance optimization. Dr. Gluck is also the conference officer for the Cognitive Science Society. He received a B.A. in psychology from Trinity University (1993) and an M.S. (1997) and a Ph.D. (1999) in cognitive psychology from Carnegie Mellon University. Laurent Itti is an associate professor of computer science, psychology, and neuroscience in the Computer Science Department at the University of Southern California. Dr. Itti’s research interests are in biologically inspired computational vision, particularly in the domains of visual attention, scene understanding, control of eye movements, and surprise. This basic research has technological applications to areas including video compression, target detection, homeland security, and robotics. He has co-authored over 75 publications in peer-reviewed journals, books, and conferences; holds two patents; and developed an open- source neuromorphic vision software toolkit used by more than 1,750 research groups and individuals worldwide. He also led the development of the first ency- clopedia of attention research. Dr. Itti received an M.S. in image processing from the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Télécommunications in Paris, France (1994) and a Ph.D. in computation and neural systems from the California Institute of Technology (2000). Matthew J. Lang is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and bio- logical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are in molecular biophysics and functional measurement of molecular and cellular machinery. He was the Jane Coffin Childs Postdoctoral Fellow in the Departments of Biological Sciences and Applied Physics at Stanford University,

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178 FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Molecular Biology and the Princ- eton Materials Institute at Princeton University, and a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Chemistry and the Physical Biosciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Lang received a B.S. from the University of Rochester and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. Karl G. Linden is a professor and Liebman Faculty Fellow in the Depart- ment of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He teaches classes on fundamentals of environmental engineering, physical and chemical treatment processes, and fundamentals and applications of ultraviolet (UV) processes in environmental systems. Dr. Linden’s research has focused on the efficacy of UV irradiation for inactivation of micro- bial pathogens, the use of UV and oxidation technologies for the degradation of environmental pollutants in water, and innovative technologies for water reuse. In 2004, he received the Klein/Stansell Family Distinguished Research Award and was a Switzer Environmental Foundation Leadership Fellow from 2001-2003. Dr. Linden’s current research is funded by the American Water Works Associa- tion Research Foundation, the Water Reuse Foundation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and various utility and industrial sponsors. He is the author of over 70 peer-reviewed publications, serves as an associate editor of the ASCE Journal of Environmental Engineering, and is a founding board member and an international vice president of the International Ultraviolet Association. Dr. Linden received a B.S. from Cornell University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis. Sanjay V. Malhotra is head of the Laboratory of Synthetic Chemistry at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Maryland. He is also a visiting scientist at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and at Brookhaven National Lab. Previously, he was an assistant professor in chemistry and environmental science at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Since 2000, he has served on the editorial board of Catalysis in Organic Reactions. In 2006, he received the American Chemical Society-New Jersey Chapter Pro Bono Award. Dr. Malhotra received M.S. (1993) and Ph.D. (1995) degrees in chemistry from Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey. Greg Morrisett is associate dean of Computer Science and Engineering and Allen B. Cutting Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University. Previ- ously, he spent 7 years on the faculty of the Computer Science Department at Cornell University. In 2002-2003, he took a sabbatical at Microsoft’s Cambridge Research Laboratory. He is serving on the editorial board for Information Pro- cessing Letters, on DARPA’s Information Science and Technology Board, and

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CONTRIBUTORS 179 on Fortify Software’s technical advisory board. He also serves on numerous Association for Computing Machinery steering and program committees. Dr. Morrisett received a B.S. in mathematics and computer science from the Univer- sity of Richmond (1989) and a Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University (1995). Rama Ranganathan is an associate professor of pharmacology in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and director of the Green Center for Systems Biology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. He is also affiliated with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The goal of his lab is to understand the process of information flow in cell signaling systems at the atomic level. Dr. Ranganathan did post-doctoral research in neurobiology at Harvard Medical School and in structural biology at the Salk Institute. He received a B.S. in bioengineering from the University of California, Berkeley (1985) and a Ph.D. in biology and an M.D. from the University of California, San Diego (1994). Diana K. Smetters is a senior member of the research staff at the Palo Alto Research Center (formerly Xerox PARC). Her research focuses on usability of security, and in particular how to design new cryptographic and security technolo- gies that make it easier to build secure systems that are easy to use. Other areas of interest include approaches to key distribution and key management, as well as security for mobile and wireless devices. Before joining PARC in 1999, she worked at CertCo, Inc., designing and building commercial systems to support high-security public key infrastructures. Dr. Smetters received a B.A. in cognitive science from Ohio State University and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in computational and experimental neuroscience. She did post- doctoral work at the Salk Institute and Columbia University. Vanessa L. Speight is an associate with Malcolm Pirnie, Inc. in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she has performed research on water-quality sampling plans, disinfection byproduct occurrence and prediction, and disinfectant decay on projects funded by the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and individual water utilities. Her expertise is regularly sought as a member of project advisory committees for the American Water Works Associa- tion (AWWA), AwwaRF, and the WateReuse Foundation; on technical review pan- els for EPA; and as a peer reviewer for professional journals. She is a member of AWWA’s Technical Advisory Workgroup on revisions to the Total Coliform Rule, chair of the AWWA Distribution Research Committee, and a member of planning committees for several leading industry conferences. Dr. Speight received a B.S. in civil engineering from McGill University (1993) and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1995 and 2003, respectively.

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180 FRONTIERS OF ENGINEERING Michael van Lent is the associate director for games research and a research assistant professor at the Institute for Creative Technologies (ICT) at the Uni- versity of Southern California. Since joining ICT in 2001, he has been the lead researcher for a number of game-based training tools including Full Spectrum Warrior and Full Spectrum Command. His research interests include adaptive intelligence for games, social and cultural simulation, and the use of game tech- nology for learning and training. Dr. van Lent has also been active in building a link between artificial intelligence (AI) researchers and game developers as the first editor-in-chief of the Journal of Game Development, as an organizer of the AI and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, and as a frequent presenter at the Game Developers’ Conference. He received a B.A. in computer science from Williams College, an M.S. in computer science from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Rebecca N. Wright is an associate professor of computer science at Rutgers University. She is also deputy director of the DIMACS Center for Discrete Math- ematics and Theoretical Computer Science. Previously, she was a professor of computer science at Stevens Institute of Technology and a researcher in the Secure Systems Research Department at AT&T Labs and AT&T Bell Labs. Her research is in the area of information security, including cryptography, privacy, foundations of computer security, and fault-tolerant distributed computing. Dr. Wright serves as an editor of the Journal of Computer Security and the International Journal of Information and Computer Security, and she was a member of the board of direc- tors of the International Association for Cryptologic Research from 2001 to 2005. She is currently serving on the National Academies’ Committee on State Voter Registration Databases. She received a B.A. from Columbia University (1988) and a Ph.D. in computer science from Yale University (1994). DINNER SPEAKER Henrique (Rico) Malvar is a Distinguished Engineer at Microsoft and the man- aging director of Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington. He received a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in electrical engineering and computer science. Before joining Microsoft in 1997, he was vice president of research and advanced development at PictureTel Corporation, and prior to that he was with the faculty of the University of Brasilia for 14 years. As the manag- ing director at Microsoft Research, he oversees the activities of over 25 research groups in many areas related to computer science. His technical interests include multimedia signal compression and enhancement, fast algorithms, multi-rate filter banks, and wavelet transforms. He has over 140 publications and over 70 patents in those areas. Dr. Malvar is a fellow of the IEEE, a member of the editorial board of the journal Applied and Computational Harmonic Analysis, and a former asso-

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CONTRIBUTORS 181 ciate editor of the journal IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing. He received the Young Scientist Award from the Marconi International Fellowship in 1981, the Best Paper Award in Image Processing from the IEEE Signal Processing Society in 1992, the 2002 Technical Achievement Award from the IEEE Signal Processing Society, and the Wavelet Pioneer Award from the SPIE in 2004.

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