Cover Image

PAPERBACK
$46.00



View/Hide Left Panel

Introduction

ANA I. ANTÓN

North Carolina State University

Raleigh, North Carolina


JOHN DUNAGAN

Microsoft Research

Redmond, Washington


Improving the trustworthiness of computer systems is a very broad research challenge in computer science. The negative consequences of our current computing infrastructure are sufficiently severe that they are discussed in the popular press, in academic forums, and in the legislative arena. While identity theft is perhaps the most widespread negative consequence today, we also face threats ranging from vote fraud to failure to protect consumer privacy.

Two of the presentations in this session cover two public concerns that remain mostly unaddressed in practice: vote fraud and consumer privacy. The other two presentations in this session cover infrastructural approaches to improving computer trustworthiness: software engineering tools and new security technologies. In total, we hope these convey the breadth of effort being expended in the research community to develop computing technologies that merit the trust society wants to place in them.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 3
Introduction Ana I. Antón North Carolina State University Raleigh, North Carolina John Dunagan Microsoft Research Redmond, Washington Improving the trustworthiness of computer systems is a very broad research challenge in computer science. The negative consequences of our current com- puting infrastructure are sufficiently severe that they are discussed in the popular press, in academic forums, and in the legislative arena. While identity theft is perhaps the most widespread negative consequence today, we also face threats ranging from vote fraud to failure to protect consumer privacy. Two of the presentations in this session cover two public concerns that remain mostly unaddressed in practice: vote fraud and consumer privacy. The other two presentations in this session cover infrastructural approaches to improving com- puter trustworthiness: software engineering tools and new security technologies. In total, we hope these convey the breadth of effort being expended in the research community to develop computing technologies that merit the trust society wants to place in them. 

OCR for page 3