G
Committee Membership

Robert H. Latiff, Chair, is vice president, chief engineer, and technology officer in SAIC’s Space and Geospatial Intelligence Business Unit. He recently retired from the U.S. Air Force as a major general, with his last assignments at the National Reconnaissance Office as the director for systems engineering and as the director of advanced systems and technology. General Latiff was a career acquisition officer, managing large, complex systems such as the Cheyenne Mountain Complex, the Air Force’s airspace management and landing systems, and the Joint Strategic Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS). Dr. Latiff holds a Ph.D. in materials science and a B.S. in physics from the University of Notre Dame.


Herman M. Reininga, Vice-Chair, retired as senior vice president of operations for Rockwell Collins. Mr. Reininga was responsible for overall management of Rockwell Collins’s global production and material operations, including manufacturing, material, quality, and facilities activities. He has served on the Defense Science Board (DSB) and testified in front of the Senate Armed Services Committee on defense technology, acquisition, and the industrial base. He chaired the DSB’s Production Technology Subgroup for Weapons Development and Production Technology Summer Studies Program that developed a manufacturing technology strategy for DoD. He is also called upon regularly to provide perspective for future manufacturing strategies. In June 2001, Mr. Reininga was inducted into the University of Iowa College of Engineering Distinguished Engineering Alumni Academy. In 1999, he received the prestigious Meritorious Public Service Citation from the Chief of Naval Research, Department of the Navy. In 1998 he was



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G Committee Membership Robert H. Latiff, Chair, is vice president, chief engineer, and technology officer in SAIC’s Space and Geospatial Intelligence Business Unit. He recently retired from the U.S. Air Force as a major general, with his last assignments at the National Reconnaissance Office as the director for systems engineering and as the director of advanced systems and technology. General Latiff was a career acquisition officer, managing large, complex systems such as the Cheyenne Mountain Complex, the Air Force’s airspace management and landing systems, and the Joint Strategic Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS). Dr. Latiff holds a Ph.D. in materials science and a B.S. in physics from the University of Notre Dame. Herman M. Reininga, Vice-Chair, retired as senior vice president of operations for Rockwell Collins. Mr. Reininga was responsible for overall management of Rockwell Collins’s global production and material operations, including manu- facturing, material, quality, and facilities activities. He has served on the Defense Science Board (DSB) and testified in front of the Senate Armed Services Committee on defense technology, acquisition, and the industrial base. He chaired the DSB’s Production Technology Subgroup for Weapons Development and Production Technology Summer Studies Program that developed a manufacturing technol- ogy strategy for DoD. He is also called upon regularly to provide perspective for future manufacturing strategies. In June 2001, Mr. Reininga was inducted into the University of Iowa College of Engineering Distinguished Engineering Alumni Academy. In 1999, he received the prestigious Meritorious Public Service Cita- tion from the Chief of Naval Research, Department of the Navy. In 1998 he was 

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aPPendix g  awarded the Defense Manufacturing Excellence award, endorsed by nine national trade associations and professional societies. Mr. Reininga is the current chair of the National Research Council’s Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. He holds a B.S. in industrial engineering from the University of Iowa and a master’s in industrial engineering from Iowa State University. Carol L. Jones Adkins has a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of New Mexico. She attended the California Institute of Technology and earned a Ph.D. in chemical engineering. At Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Dr. Adkins has performed research in chemical vapor deposition of ceramics and tungsten, aerosol processing, cleaning with supercritical CO2, and semiconductor wafer contamina- tion and cleaning. She was program leader for the wafer cleaning project under the SEMATECH CRADA. In particular, Dr. Adkins led a team of researchers inves- tigating the extension of standard wet cleaning techniques to the next generation of particle removal. She and her colleagues at Los Alamos National Laboratories were awarded the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies Commercialization Award for Supercritical CO2 in 1995. She has led SNL personnel performing research and process development in encapsulation, adhesion, and fracture mechanics of organics. During this time, Dr. Adkins was involved in negotiating several new CRADAs between SNL and Goodyear in manufacturing and engineered products. Between 1996 and 2004, she was a manager, the deputy director, and the direc- tor of the Manufacturing Science and Technology Center at SNL. The center is responsible for developing advanced manufacturing science and technology at the SNL, along with building the prototypes for various programs. She was a member of the NRC’s Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. Dr. Adkins’s cur- rent assignments are as deputy to SNL’s vice president of science and technology and partnerships and deputy to the director of the Nuclear Weapons Science and Technology program. Bruce E. Blue is the CEO of Freedom Metals, Inc., a company that specializes in processing all grades of ferrous and nonferrous scrap materials. He is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma, where he earned his bachelor’s in business admin- istration. Previous to his employment with Freedom Metals, Mr. Blue was vice president of the nonferrous division of Louisville Scrap Metal Company, Inc. He is a member of the DoD Advisory Committee on the U.S. National Stockpile and of the Deposit Legislative Taskforce for the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Mr. Blue is on the board of directors for the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (IRIS) and is chairperson of the national IRIS convention and a speaker for many IRIS educational programs. Additionally, he serves as president of the Kentucky Scrap Processors and Recyclers.

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m a nag i n g m at e r i a l s twenty-first century military  for a Kenneth S. Flamm is the Dean Rusk Chair in International Affairs at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas in Austin. He received a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in economics. From 1993 to 1995, Dr. Flamm served as principal deputy assistant secretary of defense for economic security and special assistant to the deputy secretary of defense for dual use technology policy. He was awarded DoD’s Distinguished Public Service Medal in 1995 by Secretary Perry. Prior to his service at DoD, he spent 11 years as a senior fellow in the foreign policy studies program at the Brookings Institution. Dr. Flamm has been a professor of economics at the Instituto Tecnológico A. de México in Mexico City, the University of Massachusetts, and George Washington University. He has also been an adviser to the director general of income policy in the Mexican Ministry of Finance and a consultant to the Organisation for Economic Coopera- tion and Development, the World Bank, the Latin American economic system, DoD, the Department of Justice, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress. Dr. Flamm’s publi- cations include Mismanaged Trade: Strategic Policy and the Semiconductor Industry (1996), Changing the Rules: Technological Change, International Competition, and Regulation in Communications (editor, with Robert Crandell, 1989), Creating the Computer: Government, Industry, and High Technology (1988), and Targeting the Computer: Governmental Support and International Competition (1987). He is cur- rently working on an analytical study of the post-Cold War defense industrial base. Dr. Flamm has been a member of the NRC’s Board on Science, Technology and Economic Policy, and has served on a number of NRC committees on innovation and competitiveness. Katharine G. Frase is vice president, technical and business strategy, IBM Software Group. Her team is responsible for technical strategy, business strategy, business development, standards, competitive analysis, and the application of advanced technologies across SWG. Dr. Frase received an A.B. in chemistry from Bryn Mawr College and a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Before her current position at IBM, Dr. Frase was vice president of technology at IBM, in which role she was responsible for technical resources, recognition, assessment, and strategy across IBM. In 2006, in recognition of her distinguished contributions to engineering, she was elected as a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Earlier IBM responsibilities included management of process development, design/modeling methodology and pro- duction for chip carrier assembly, and final testing for IBM silicon products. Her research interests include mechanical properties/structural interactions in com- posites, high-temperature superconductors, solid electrolytes (fast ionic conduc- tors), ceramic powder synthetic methods, and ceramic packaging. She chaired an IBM/Academy workshop on lead solder reduction actions, and in 1998 served as

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aPPendix g  the packaging assurance manager for IBM worldwide. Dr. Frase has served as a member of the NRC’s Board on Assessment of National Institute of Standards and Technology Programs and is currently the chair of the Panel on Materials Science and Engineering. Dr. Frase is the chair of the National Materials Advisory Board. Donald E. Gessaman is a consultant to the EOP Group, a Washington, D.C., con- sulting firm specializing in environmental, energy, and other government-related issues, and to the EOP Foundation, a policy research and training activity. He has been the principal author of 11 editions of Understanding the Budget of the United States Government, a book addressing all aspects of the federal budget process, pub- lished annually by the EOP Foundation. In addition, Mr. Gessaman is a frequent lecturer on federal budget policy and processes at the Management Development Centers of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and at federal agency training programs. In 1995, when Mr. Gessaman retired from the federal government, he was the deputy associate director for national security at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in the Executive Office of the President. During his 28 years at the OMB, he also served as a budget examiner, the Navy branch chief, and deputy chief of the National Security Division, which provides analyses and options on defense and intelligence resource issues, including the national defense materials stockpile, for the OMB director and the President. During his federal career, Mr. Gessaman received the OMB Professional Achievement award, the Presidential rank awards of Meritorious Executive and Distinguished Executive, and the Dis- tinguished Public Service Medal from the Secretary of Defense. Mr. Gessaman’s education includes an undergraduate degree in industrial management from the University of Cincinnati and a master’s degree in industrial engineering from Stanford University. In addition, Mr. Gessaman completed the Program for Senior Executives in National and International Security at the Kennedy School of Govern- ment at Harvard University. Stephen T. Gonczy is the founder of Gateway Materials Technology, Inc. (GMT), a scientific research and materials engineering consulting firm with a special focus on advanced ceramics and ceramic composites. Dr. Gonczy received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Marquette University and his Ph.D in materials sci- ence and engineering from Northwestern University. He has over 25 years of indus- trial research and development experience in advanced materials for aerospace, automotive, and industrial power applications. Dr. Gonczy has been the principal investigator in many projects, including standardized tests for ceramic coatings and porous ceramics; processing and application of polymer-derived ceramics; import-export regulations for ceramic composites; materials database develop- ment for ceramic composites and cast metals; low-cost coatings for ceramic fibers; processing, properties, and stability of ceramic composites; and material design

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m a nag i n g m at e r i a l s twenty-first century military 0 for a studies for Web publication. Dr. Gonczy currently holds leadership positions on two national ceramic technology committees. He is the chairman of ASTM C28 Advanced Ceramics and has over 20 years of technical author effort and leadership responsibilities for the committee. He is also the current chairman of the ceramic matrix composites working group for ASTM’s Composites Materials Handbook  (CMH-17) and has been an active member since 1996. Prior to founding GMT, Dr. Gonczy worked as a research scientist and a research group leader in advanced ceramics at Honeywell (then Allied Signal) Research Center. Dr. Gonczy was a member of the U.S. Army Reserve, serving in logistics and acquisition positions for over 25 years and retiring as a brigadier general in 2004. Ralph L. Keeney is a research professor at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. He has a B.S. in engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles, an M.S. in electrical engineering from MIT, and a Ph.D. in operations research from MIT. Prior to joining the Duke faculty, Dr. Keeney was a faculty member in management and in engineering at MIT and at the University of South- ern California, a research scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria, and the founder of the decision and risk analysis group of a large geotechnical and environmental consulting firm. Dr. Keeney is the author of many books and articles, including (with Howard Raiffa) Decisions with Multiple Objectives (reprinted by Cambridge University Press, 1993), which won the ORSA Lanchester Prize, and Value-Focused Thinking: A Path to Creative Decision- making (Harvard University Press, 1992), which received the Decision Analysis Society’s Best Publication award. His latest book, Smart Choices: A Practical Guide to Making Better Decisions (Harvard Business School Press, 1999), written with John S. Hammond and Howard Raiffa, also received the Decision Analysis Society’s Best Publication award. It has been translated into 16 languages. Dr. Keeney was awarded the Ramsey Medal for Distinguished Contributions in Decision Analysis by the Decision Analysis Society and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Edward R. Kielty is president of the Hall Chemical Company. He has a B.S. from Long Island University and an M.A. from New York University. Mr. Kielty has spent almost 35 years in the metals industry, starting with African Metals Corporation in 1972 and spending the next 22 years involved in the UM / Sogem Group. In 1992, he was named president of the joint venture company between Gecamines and Sogem, African Metals Corporation. From 1994 through 1998, Mr. Kielty worked at the Hall Chemical Company, where he spent the most of his tenure as the vice president of operations. In 1999, he became a consultant for Anglovaal Mining and was involved in the emerging cobalt project in Zambia at Chambishi Metals PLC. In January 2000, Mr. Kielty became the vice president for marketing

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aPPendix g  and sales at Chambishi Metals PLC. His past and present memberships include the American Society for Metals, the American Powder Metal Institute (past director), the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Cobalt Development Institute (past director and member of the statistics committee), the Refractory Metals Association (past president and director), and the U.S. National Defense Stockpile Advisory Committee (chair of the sales and methodology sector). J. Patrick Looney is the assistant laboratory director for policy and strategic plan- ning at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where he oversees the lab business plan, which determines the direction of its scientific programs, and oversees the Directed Research and Development Program, a competitive program for Brookhaven scien- tists in which the laboratory awards funding for highly innovative and exploratory research that fits into the mission of the laboratory. Dr. Looney is also responsible for the laboratory’s technology transfer functions, including collaborations with industry and work for others and for increasing funding from sources other than DOE. After earning a B.S. in physics from the University of Delaware, Dr. Looney went on to Pennsylvania State University, where he earned an M.S. and a Ph.D. in physics. From 1987 to 2002, Dr. Looney held several research positions at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), eventually becoming a program analyst responsible for developing policy and program plans for NIST research. In March 2002, Dr. Looney became the assistant director of physical sciences and engineering in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, where he worked closely with other White House offices, including the Office of Management and Budget, to coordinate policy development and set budget priorities. Dr. Looney is a fellow of AVS, the American Science and Technology Society. Graham R. Mitchell is a professor of practice and director of the program in entrepreneurship at Lehigh University, where he is responsible for developing and teaching the university’s minor program in entrepreneurship. He received B.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Westminster, London. From 1998 to 2003 Dr. Mitchell was the Bladstrom visiting professor (entrepreneurship) at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Wharton program in technological innovation. Between 1993 and 1997 he was appointed as U.S. assistant secretary of commerce for technology policy, where his responsibilities included the development and implementation of policies to increase the role of technology in enhancing the competitiveness and economic growth of the United States. From 1980 to 1993, he was the direc- tor of planning and forecasting for GTE (now Verizon), where he developed and operated corporate technology planning systems covering GTE’s main businesses in telecommunications, lighting, and materials. From 1968 to 1980 he worked at

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m a nag i n g m at e r i a l s twenty-first century military  for a General Electric as manager of research, engineering, and business development in operations and with the Corporate Research and Development Center. He is an author of or collaborator on 50 papers and studies in technology, business manage- ment, and policy and holds seven U.S. patents. Major honors include the Industrial Research Institute’s Maurice Holland award and an award from the International Association for the Management of Technology. Peter C. Mory completed a B.A. and an M.S. in geology at Case Western Reserve University, following his decorated service in the U.S. Army, including service in Vietnam. In 1973, Mr. Mory joined the U.S. Bureau of Mines (BM), where he con- ducted fieldwork, evaluated mineral resources, and prepared reports for over 30 forest service areas in the United States. These areas were highly varied in geology and contained energy resources (coal) and metallic and nonmetallic minerals. At that time, Mr. Mory authored or coauthored 20 mineral resource publications of the U.S. Geological Survey. In 1983 he joined the BM Division of Mineral Land Assessment office in Washington, D.C. He served as bureau manager for all mineral resource studies of the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Indian Affairs lands. He coordinated the activities of over 90 mineral professionals at three field centers with a budget of over $12 million and developed technical knowledge and in-depth experience of minerals and materials, economics, engineering, geology, industry, and supply and demand for a wide range of metallic and nonmetallic materials and energy resources. In 1992 he became a senior industrial specialist as well as serving as deputy to the chief staff officer at the U.S. Bureau of Mines. At this time he served as emergency preparedness coordinator on the Bureau director’s senior advisory staff. His responsibilities there included policy in the domestic and foreign commodities industry, materials, facilities, production processes, and supply and imports of all strategic and critical materials in the Defense National Stockpile. He coordinated and was responsible for the accuracy of all commodi- ties data and information going to the Market Impact Committee and the DNS and was responsible for emergency preparedness planning and actions relating to bureau commodity supply and demand activities (a classified position). Mr. Mory participated as a strategic mineral/materials expert for the Department of the Interior in the annual global war games at the Naval War College at Newport, Rhode Island. When the BM closed in 1996, Mr. Mory joined the Defense National Stockpile Center as a senior industrial specialist and rose to become director of the stockpile’s Directorate of Market Research and Planning. There he was responsible for all mineral data and information from the Market Impact Committee mem- bers (U.S. Geological Survey and Department of Commerce) to the stockpile. He supervised the development of the Annual Materials Plan detailing the sales level for all materials in the stockpile, which was annually submitted to Congress, and directed research into domestic and international marketing factors such as changes

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aPPendix g  in supply/demand, production, consumption, imports/exports, prices, and stock levels and their impact on markets for stockpile materials. David C. Mowery is William A. and Betty H. Hasler Professor of New Enter- prise Development at the Walter A. Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received his undergraduate and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Stanford University and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Business School. Dr. Mowery taught at Carnegie Mellon University, served as the staff officer for the Panel on Technology and Employment of the National Academy of Sciences, and served in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative as part of the International Affairs Fellowship program of the Council on Foreign Relations. He has been a member of a number of National Research Council committees, including those on the Competitive Status of the U.S. Civil Aviation Industry, on the Causes and Con- sequences of the Internationalization of U.S. Manufacturing, on the Federal Role in Civilian Technology Development, on U.S. Strategies for the Children’s Vaccine Initiative, on Applications of Biotechnology to Contraceptive Research and Devel- opment, and on New Approaches to Breast Cancer Detection and Diagnosis. He is currently vice chair of the Committee on Competitiveness and Workforce Needs of United States Industry and he was recently a member of the NRC’s National Mate- rial Advisory Board’s review of the nanotechnology initiative. He was principal edi- tor of the report U.S. Industry in 000: Studies in Competitive Performance (1999), a compilation of STEP studies. His research deals with the economics of technologi- cal innovation and with the effects of public policies on innovation; he has testified before congressional committees and served as an adviser for the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, federal agencies, private companies, and industrial firms. Dr. Mowery has published numerous academic papers and has written or edited a number of books, including “Ivory Tower” and Industrial Innovation: University-Industry Technology Transfer Before and After the Bayh-Dole Act, Paths of Innovation: Technological Change in 0th-Century America, and The International Computer Software Industry: A Comparative Study of Industry Evolu- tion and Structure. His academic awards include the Raymond Vernon Prize from the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, the Economic History Association’s Fritz Redlich Prize, the Business History Review’s Newcomen Prize, and the Cheit Outstanding Teaching Award. Daniel B. Mueller is an associate research scientist in industrial ecology at Yale University, where his research is focused on modeling and scenario building for a wide variety of metals and biomass, as well as characterizing the cycles of dif- ferent metals throughout their life cycles, in all significant world countries and regions. Dr. Mueller works in close collaboration with various governmental and

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m a nag i n g m at e r i a l s twenty-first century military  for a nongovernmental organizations, which in the case of the United States include the U.S. Geological Survey, the Census Bureau, the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the United Nations’ Statistics Divi- sion (international trade). He also works with a variety of industries and indus- try organizations, such as the Raw Materials Group, the International Iron and Steel Institute, the International Stainless Steel Forum, the Nickel Institute, the Chromium Development Association, the International Molybdenum Associa- tion, the Copper Development Association, the International Lead and Zinc Study Group, the International Aluminum Institute, and the International Platinum Association, Earlier, Dr. Mueller was a postdoctoral fellow at Delft University of Technology and a doctoral student at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. Dr. Mueller also served as a scientific collaborator at the Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technology. He received an M.S. in rural engineering and a Ph.D. in technical sciences from the Swiss Federal Institute for Technology in Zurich. He is a member of the International Society for Industrial Ecology and the International Society for Ecological Economics and serves as a consultant for Organe Consultatif sur les Changements Climatiques (OcCC), in Bern, for its program on the secondary benefits of greenhouse gas reduction measures, and as a reviewer for the journal Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Forstwesen, the Journal for Industrial Ecology, Systems Research and Behavioral Sciences, Ecological Economics, and Waste Management and Research. Madan M. Singh is the director of the Department of Mines and Mineral Resources, state of Arizona. He has a Ph.D. in mining engineering and is a registered profes- sional engineer in Arizona. His research interests and areas of expertise encompass aspects of mining, geotechnical engineering, tunneling, subsidence, environmental studies, and other related fields. In 1975, Dr. Singh founded Engineers International and developed it from a one-man operation to a company with a staff of over 50. He has authored over 100 technical papers in addition to serving as associate editor and chapter author on mine subsidence in the SME Mining Engineering Handbook and the Mining Environmental Handbook. He has chaired several symposia and lectured extensively. Dr. Singh has been involved with a variety of professional organizations, including as national director of the American Consulting Engineers Council, president of the Consulting Engineers Council of Illinois, member of the board of directors of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration, Inc. (SME), chair of the SME Coal Division, and chair of the American Society for Test- ing and Materials subcommittee on rock strength. In 1996, Dr. Singh was named a Centennial Fellow by the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences at Penn State and was honored with the Robert Stefanko Distinguished Achievement Award by the Department of Energy and Geoenvironmental Engineering in 1999. He won the Howard N. Eavenson Award of SME in 2000 and was selected as a Distinguished

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aPPendix g  Member in 2004. Dr. Singh has served on two NRC committees related to coal and on the U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics and the U.S. National Com- mittee on Tunneling Technology. Kathleen Walsh is assistant professor of national security affairs in the National Security Decision Making Department of the Naval War College where she teaches a master’s-level seminar on how to analyze the U.S. policy-making process (PMP) to U.S. Navy personnel and select officers from other military services, domestic and international. She is also involved in curriculum development for the PMP course and conducts ongoing research and writing on issues where she has established expertise, including U.S.-China relations, China’s evolving science and technology strategy, issues of technology transfer and proliferation of arms and weapons of mass destruction, as well as U.S. and multilateral export control policy. She has also worked as a consultant with the Henry L. Stimson Center on Post-Conflict Border Security and Trade Controls. Prior to joining the faculty of the Naval War College, she was an independent consultant to the U.S. government, research enterprises, and Washington-area think tanks. From 2000 to 2004, Ms. Walsh was senior associ- ate at the Henry L. Stimson Center, where her research focused on Asia, primarily China, and related issues of technology transfer, proliferation, and security. From 1997 to 2000, she was senior associate at DFI International, a private defense con- sulting firm. Ms. Walsh’s extensive experience in Washington, D.C., includes work for several departments in the executive branch, Congress, and both public- and private-sector research institutions and think tanks. She is the author of several publications and numerous articles, reports, briefings, and congressional testimo- nies. She holds an M.A. in international security policy from Columbia University and a B.A. in international affairs from George Washington University. Jim Williams is professor of materials science and engineering and Honda Chair at the Ohio State University (OSU). From 2001 until 2004 he was dean of engi- neering and Honda Chair, also at OSU. Until 1999 he was general manager of the Materials and Process Engineering Department at GE Aircraft Engines. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of TMS/AIME, and a fellow of ASM International. He is the recipient of the 1992 ASM Gold Medal, the 1993 TMS/AIME Leadership Award, the 2002 TMS/AIME Application to Practice Award, and the International Titanium Association’s 2003 Achievement Award and was inducted into the GE Aircraft Engines Propulsion Hall of Fame in 2003. He was chairman of NRC’s National Materials Advisory Board from 1989 to 1995. He was a member of the Oversight Committee of the NRC’s Division of Engineering and Physical Sciences from 2000 to 2005. He was a member of the MST Division Review Committee from 1993 to 1999 and the ESA Division Review Committee at Los Alamos National Laboratory from 2000 to 2006. He served on the U.S. Air

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m a nag i n g m at e r i a l s twenty-first century military  for a Force Scientific Advisory Board from 1994 to 2000. Prior to joining GE in 1988, he spent 13 years at Carnegie Mellon University as professor, president of the Mellon Institute, and dean of engineering. Before joining Carnegie Mellon he held research and engineering positions with Rockwell and Boeing. He has consulted extensively for government and industry. He has published more than 200 papers based on his research. His professional interests include structure-property relations of high-strength materials, the performance of materials in extreme environments (temperature, stress and strain rate), materials processing, and technology policy, particularly as it pertains to materials and the management of high technology organizations. In much of his work he specialized in titanium alloys. In 2003 he and G. Lütjering wrote the book Titanium, published by Springer-Verlag, which released a second edition in the spring of 2007. Dr. Williams received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in metallurgical engineering from the University of Washington.