C
Committee and Staff Biographies

Mary Anne Carroll (Chair) is director of the Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emissions and Transport (PROPHET), executive director of the Biosphere-Atmosphere Research and Training Program (BART), and a professor of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences,Chemistry, and Geological Sciences at the University of Michigan. Her areas of interest include oxidant photochemistry, distribution, and trends; atmosphere-forest exchange of reactive nitrogen (a factor in carbon storage); and the impacts of air pollutants on ecosystem function and emissions. She served as editor for the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres from 1997 to 2000, is a past member of the NRC's Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data, the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry, and the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. Dr. Carroll received her Sc.D. in atmospheric chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Raymond W. Arritt is a Professor at Iowa State University’s Department of Agronomy. His research emphasis is on regional-scale atmospheric processes, focusing on regional climate modeling and atmospheric processes affecting warm-season precipitation. Dr. Arritt is a member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS). He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Hydrometeorology, and has served on the AMS’s Committee on Mountain Meteorology and the AGU’s Committee on Clouds and Precipitation. He served as a Contributing Author to the Third and Fourth Assessment Reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He received his PhD from Colorado State University and his MS and BA from the University of Virginia.


James A. Edmonds is a Senior Staff Scientist and Technical Leader of Economic Programs at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration with the University of Maryland on the College Park campus. Dr. Edmonds heads an international global change research program at PNNL with active collaborations in more than a dozen institutions and countries around the world. He is the principal investigator for the Global Energy Technology Strategy Program to Address Climate Change, an international public-private research collaboration. Dr. Edmonds is well known for his contributions to the field of the integrated assessment of climate change and the examination of interactions between energy, technology, policy and the environment. He has expounded extensively on the



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Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program’s Synthesis and Assessment Product 3.2, “Climate Projections Based on Emission Scenarios for Long-lived and Short-lived Radiatively Active Gases and Aerosols” C Committee and Staff Biographies Mary Anne Carroll (Chair) is director of the Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emissions and Transport (PROPHET), executive director of the Biosphere-Atmosphere Research and Training Program (BART), and a professor of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences,Chemistry, and Geological Sciences at the University of Michigan. Her areas of interest include oxidant photochemistry, distribution, and trends; atmosphere-forest exchange of reactive nitrogen (a factor in carbon storage); and the impacts of air pollutants on ecosystem function and emissions. She served as editor for the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres from 1997 to 2000, is a past member of the NRC's Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data, the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry, and the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. Dr. Carroll received her Sc.D. in atmospheric chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Raymond W. Arritt is a Professor at Iowa State University’s Department of Agronomy. His research emphasis is on regional-scale atmospheric processes, focusing on regional climate modeling and atmospheric processes affecting warm-season precipitation. Dr. Arritt is a member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS). He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Hydrometeorology, and has served on the AMS’s Committee on Mountain Meteorology and the AGU’s Committee on Clouds and Precipitation. He served as a Contributing Author to the Third and Fourth Assessment Reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He received his PhD from Colorado State University and his MS and BA from the University of Virginia. James A. Edmonds is a Senior Staff Scientist and Technical Leader of Economic Programs at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration with the University of Maryland on the College Park campus. Dr. Edmonds heads an international global change research program at PNNL with active collaborations in more than a dozen institutions and countries around the world. He is the principal investigator for the Global Energy Technology Strategy Program to Address Climate Change, an international public-private research collaboration. Dr. Edmonds is well known for his contributions to the field of the integrated assessment of climate change and the examination of interactions between energy, technology, policy and the environment. He has expounded extensively on the

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Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program’s Synthesis and Assessment Product 3.2, “Climate Projections Based on Emission Scenarios for Long-lived and Short-lived Radiatively Active Gases and Aerosols” subject of global change including books, papers, and presentations. His publications include Global Energy: Assessing the Future, with John Reilly (Oxford University Press) and A Primer on Greenhouse Gases (Lewis Publishing and scientific book of the year at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory). He has served as a Lead Author for all three major assessments of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and numerous interim assessment reports. He has frequently testified before Congress and briefed the Executive Branch of the United States Government, and has prepared and conducted numerous briefings and lectures to a wide range of audiences. His received his Ph.D. and M.A. in economics from Duke University and his B.A. in economics from Kalamazoo College. Loretta J. Mickley is a research associate in the Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. She primarily investigates the complex relationship between climate change and tropospheric ozone and aerosols. Dr. Mickley’s work addresses an array of chemistry-climate questions such as: how human activity has changed the composition of the atmosphere, the effect of tropospheric ozone on climate change, causes of pollution episodes, the influence of future climate change on air quality. Dr. Mickley received her master’s degree in chemistry from the University of Illinois at Chicago and her Ph.D. in geophysical sciences from the University of Chicago. Phillip Rasch is a Senior Scientist in the NCAR Climate and Global Dynamics Division’s (CGD) Climate Modeling Section. His main focus has been on understanding the connections between clouds, chemistry and climate of the Earth system. Work in this broad area has required basic contributions in numerical methods for atmospheric models, as well as contributions in the representation of cloud processes, and processes that control the transport, production, and loss of trace constituents in the atmosphere. He is a member of the development team for the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), and the Community Climate System Modeling (CCSM) project, and has contributed in the above mentioned areas to that model. He was the principal architect of MATCH (Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry) at transport model used by researchers worldwide. Rasch is the co-Chair of the Atmospheric Model Working Group within the CCSM project, facilitating research within a group of scientists numbering in the hundreds around the country. He oversees the day to day activitives of the group’s model development and helps in coordinating the planning of future versions. He is a chair of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry project (IGAC), and an organizer of the IGBP/WCRP activity called Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate (AC&C). He has served in various editorial positions for international journals, served on advisory panels for NSF, DOE, and NASA, and is a member of numerous science teams on NASA projects. He has been a contributing author to NASA,World Meteorological Organization, and International Panel on Climate Change assessment documents. He has served and/or chaired organizing committees for NATO Advanced Study Institutes and World Climate Research Programme workshops. He was a member of the NSF Science and Technology Center for Clouds, Chemistry and Climate (C4), and was chair of the modeling activity within that center.

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Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program’s Synthesis and Assessment Product 3.2, “Climate Projections Based on Emission Scenarios for Long-lived and Short-lived Radiatively Active Gases and Aerosols” Armistead G. Russell is the Georgia Power Distinguished Professor and Coordinator of Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Professor Russell has expertise in air quality engineering, with particular emphasis in air quality modeling, air quality monitoring and analysis. He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology in 1980 and 1985, conducting his research at Caltech’s Environmental Quality Laboratory. His B.S. is from Washington State University (1979). Dr. Russell has been a member of a number of the National Research Council’s committees, including chairing the Committee to Review EPA’s Mobile Model and chairing the committee on Carbon Monoxide Episodes in Meteorological and Topographical Problem Areas, and serving on the committee on Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement, the committee on ozone forming potential of reformulated fuels and the committee on Risk Assessment of Hazardous Air Pollutants. Recently, he served on two EPA SAB subcommittees: the CASAC subcommittee on the National Ambient Air Monitoring Strategy and the subcommittee on Air Quality Modelling Subcommittee of the Advisory Council on Clean Air Compliance Analysis. He was also a member of the EPA FACA Subcommittee on Ozone, Particulate Matter and Regional Haze, the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone and California’s Reactivity Science Advisory Committee. Previously he was on the Office of Science, Technology and Policy’s Oxygenated Fuels Program Review and various National Research Council program reviews, and a committee to review a Canadian NRC program. Joellen L. Russell is an assistant professor of geosciences at the University of Arizona and previously worked as a research scientist at Princeton University’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Her primary research focus is on the role of Southern Ocean intermediate and mode waters in the global carbon cycle, ocean circulation, and heat budget. Dr. Russell received her Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of California, San Diego and her BA in Environmental Geoscience from Harvard University. Lisa C. Sloan is Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Her research interests focus on understanding the processes that have controlled past climates, environments, and surficial processes in Earth history. Her research has concentrated primarily on Cenozoic events and processes, with primary emphasis on the warm and transitional intervals of that era of Earth history. Dr. Sloan's research involves examining marine and terrestrial geologic records of climatic and environmental change and investigating the driving forces behind such changes. Dr. Sloan was elected Associate Fellow of Canadian Institute for Advanced Research in 1999 and has served as National Secretary of the American Geophysical Union’s Ocean Sciences Section (Marine Geology and Geophysics). She received her Ph.D. in Geosciences from Pennsylvania State University, her M.S. in Geology from Kent State University, and her B.S. in Geology from Allegheny College. Maria Uhle has been a Program Officer with the Polar Research Board at the National Research Council since April of 2005. Prior to joining the NRC, she was the Jones Assistant Professor of Environmental Organic Geochemistry in the Department of Earth

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Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program’s Synthesis and Assessment Product 3.2, “Climate Projections Based on Emission Scenarios for Long-lived and Short-lived Radiatively Active Gases and Aerosols” and Planetary Sciences at the University of Tennessee. At UT, Dr. Uhle mentored several graduate students in various scientific disciplines including Quaternary climate studies, salt marsh ecology, reconstruction of biomass burning events throughout geologic history, organic contaminate remediation and Antarctic biogeochemistry. Dr Uhle received her B.S. from Bates College, M.S. from the University of Massachusetts and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. At the NRC, she has directed several studies including Assessment of the U.S. Coast Guard Polar Icebreakers Roles and Future Needs, Exploration of Antarctic Subglacial Aquatic Environments: Environmental and Scientific Stewardship. She continues to work with the U.S. National Committee on the International Polar Year developing interagency communications and public outreach and education projects. Rob Greenway is a Senior Program Assistant at the National Academies Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. He has worked on NRC studies that produced the reports Assessment of the Benefits of Extending the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission: A Perspective from the Research and Operations Communities, Review of NOAA’s Plan for the Scientific Stewardship Program, Where the Weather Meets the Road: A Research Agenda for Improving Road Weather Services, and Completing the Forecast: Characterizing and Communicating Uncertainty for Better Decisions Using Weather and Climate Forecasts, among others. He received his A.B. in English and his M.Ed. in English education from the University of Georgia.