For further research, the workshop attendees noted the following important considerations:

  • appropriate exposure regimes,

  • multi-center collaborations using identical research protocols,

  • large sample sizes, and

  • reliable EEG analysis techniques.

In addition, most human studies have examined healthy young adults, a group not necessarily representing the most susceptible part of the population. Therefore, future research needs to include children, the elderly, and people with underlying diseases. While the basic thermoregulatory physiology of healthy people in relation to external heat stress and internal heat load generated by RF radiation is well known, elderly people may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of heat stress (coronary and cerebral thrombosis); therefore, a gap exists in the study of this population.

Current research gaps include little existing information about neurophysiological changes duringheavy (occupational) use of cellular phones for several years. A second gap is that no studies using elderly volunteersare available, but could be performed. Finally, there is a continuing need for experiments focusing on possible adverse RF effects identified by changes in cognitive performance functions.

Research Needs

There are some considerable research needs for human laboratory studies. Due to the paucity of data from identically replicated experiments,

  1. There is a need for experiments focusing on possible adverse RF effects identified by changes in EEG activity, as well as a need to include a larger number of subjects.

Research Gaps

Research Ongoing

  1. Little or no information is available on possible neurophysiologic effects developing during long-term exposure to RF fields.

  2. Risks of exposure to RF fields in elderly volunteers arenot well explored.

  3. There is a continuing need for experiments focusing on possible adverse RF effects identified by changes in cognitive performance functions.



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