Appendix B
Committee Biographical Sketches

Frank S. Barnes, Ph.D., NAE, is distinguished professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He received a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. His career has included research in a wide variety of applications in physics and electrical engineering, focusing on fundamental research on the biological effects of electromagnetic fields, surgical procedures, and telecommunications education. His research has included the effects of radio waves, fields from power lines, and ultrasonic fields on biological systems—trying to understand the mechanisms of interaction that might lead to identification of hazards, the setting of safety standards, and the establishment of minimum detectable fields. He has been an author of more than 150 papers. Dr. Barnes is an AAAS fellow, an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) fellow, and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2001. He received the Gordon Prize for Innovations in Engineering Education and is a past-president of the Bioelectromagnetics Society (BEMS). Dr. Barnes chaired a National Academies’ committee that assessed in four reports potential health effects from exposures to low-level radiofrequency energy produced by a phased-array radar.


Om P. Gandhi, Ph.D., has been a faculty member in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Utah since 1967, where he has been a professor since 1973. He also served as the department chairman from 1992 to 2000. Having worked in the field of bioeletromagnetics (safety assessment and medical applications of electromagnetic fields) since 1973, Dr. Gandhi has expertise regarding electromagnetic (EM) absorption



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Appendix B Committee Biographical Sketches Frank S. Barnes, Ph.D., NAE, is distinguished professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He received a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford Uni- versity. His career has included research in a wide variety of applications in physics and electrical engineering, focusing on fundamental research on the biological effects of electromagnetic fields, surgical procedures, and telecommunications education. His research has included the effects of radio waves, fields from power lines, and ultrasonic fields on biological systems—trying to understand the mechanisms of interaction that might lead to identification of hazards, the setting of safety standards, and the establishment of minimum detectable fields. He has been an author of more than 150 papers. Dr. Barnes is an AAAS fellow, an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) fellow, and was elected to the National Acad- emy of Engineering in 2001. He received the Gordon Prize for Innovations in Engineering Education and is a past-president of the Bioelectromagnetics Society (BEMS). Dr. Barnes chaired a National Academies’ committee that assessed in four reports potential health effects from exposures to low-level radiofrequency energy produced by a phased-array radar. Om P. Gandhi, Ph.D., has been a faculty member in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Utah since 1967, where he has been a professor since 1973. He also served as the department chairman from 1992 to 2000. Having worked in the field of bioeletromagnetics (safety assessment and medical applications of electromagnetic fields) since 1973, Dr. Gandhi has expertise regarding electromagnetic (EM) absorption 

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 APPENDIX B in humans for various public and personnel radio frequency EM exposure environments using anatomically based models of the human body and numerical electromagnetic techniques that are used to understand coupling of EM fields for far- and near-field exposures from power line to microwave frequencies. This expertise includes the use of numerical and experimental techniques for compliance testing of wireless communication devices and development of instrumentation for assessing personnel safety. From 1995 to 2003, Dr. Gandhi served as chairman of the National Council of Ra- diation Protection’s Scientific Committee 89-4 on “Biological Effects and Exposure Recommendations for Pulse-Modulated RF Fields.” Dr. Gandhi was elected a fellow of the IEEE in 1979 and received the distinguished research award from the University of Utah for 1979-1980. He received the Utah Governor’s Medal for Science and Technology in 2002 and the Microwave Pioneer Award of the IEEE-Microwave Theory and Techniques Society in 2001. He has been president of the Bioelectromagnetics Society (1992-1993), co-chairman of IEEE SCC 28.IV Subcommittee on the RF Safety Standards (1988-1997), and chairman of the IEEE Committee on Man and Radiation (1980-1982). Dr. Gandhi is author or co-author of several book chapters and over 250 peer-reviewed journal articles on elec- tromagnetic dosimetry, microwave tubes, and solid-state devices. When the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) testing of the cell phone industry was mandated by the FCC in 1993, his laboratory at the University of Utah provided a service to test cell phones during the years 1993-1999 from a number of manufacturers. Maila Hietanen, Ph.D., is head of the Non-Ionizing Radiation (NIR) Sec- tion at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) in Helsinki, Finland. She has a background in applied physics, and her research inter- ests focus on assessment and prevention of health risks related to human exposure to non-ionizing radiation. In recent years Dr. Hietanen with her research team has been doing research on the neurophysiological and cardio- physiological effects associated with the use of mobile phones. In addition, her research work includes a study on subjective symptoms of persons with perceived electrical hypersensitivity. Dr. Hietanen has been a board member (2001–2007) of the European Bioelectromagnetic Association (EBEA). She has also served on the board of the BEMS, and was an associate editor for the Bioelectromagnetics Journal during the years 2003-2005. She has been involved in research cooperation within the European Coordination Action (EMF-NET). She is also the vice-chair of the European COST 281 Action (“Potential Health Implications from Mobile Communication”), and a member of several European and international standards commit- tees (CENELEC, IEC). She was also nominated as the Finnish representa- tive at the International Advisory Committee of the WHO EMF Project.

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 APPENDIX B Dr. Hietanen was invited as a member of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) in 1996, and elected as the ICNIRP vice-chair for 2004-2008. Currently she is involved in a national research program, which receives funding from the Finnish Technological Agency, which in turn receives some funding from industry in addition to the governmental budget. Leeka Kheifets, Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology in UCLA’s School of Public Health. Most recently she was head of the Radiation Studies Program at the World Health Organization. Previously she was a techni- cal executive at the Electric Power Research Institute, where she directed a multidisciplinary electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) research program. She taught at the Stanford University School of Medicine in the Depart- ment of Health Research and Policy and is widely known for her work in environmental and occupational epidemiology. Dr. Kheifets serves on international and national committees that provide advice to governments on environmental policy. She is a member of the International Committee of the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). She has served on com- mittees for the National Research Council, IEEE, and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Dr. Kheifets was also a member of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the International Agency for Research on Cancer Working Groups, and WHO EHC Task Groups charged with evaluating potential health effects from EMF expo- sure. Her research interests include epidemiology of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, as well as a methodologic research in risk assessment and policy development. Dr. Kheifets has been a member of the standing committee on epidemiology of the ICNIRP since March 2002. A portion of Dr. Kheifets’s funding comes from the nonprofit Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to study effects of power-frequency fields (60 Hz). EPRI in turn receives funding from the electrical power industry. She has also consulted for electric utilities. Rüdiger Matthes received his M.E. degree in electronic engineering from the Technical University in Munich. Since 1989 he has served as head of the group “Non-Ionizing Radiation (Dosimetry)” at the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection. The interests of this group cover all aspects of nonionizing radiation protection with the main focus on dosimetry. He has been the scientific secretary of the ICNIRP since 1993. Mr. Matthes is currently coordinating a €17 million German research program on pos- sible health effects from mobile communication technologies. Mr. Matthes himself is a civil servant and thus completely independent from external funding. In addition, the Federal Office for Radiation Protection has a close liaison to the International EMF Project of the World Health Organization.

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 APPENDIX B Mr. Matthes is the German expert in this program that currently reviews scientific evidence in the radio frequency area. ICNIRP is also reviewing the scientific literature in that field. At that organization, Mr. Matthes is chairing the standing committee on physics and technology. David L. McCormick, Ph.D., D.A.B.T., is senior vice-president and director of IIT Research Institute (IITRI). At IITRI, Dr. McCormick leads the research activities of approximately 150 scientists, technicians, and support staff working in the fields of toxicology, carcinogenesis and cancer prevention, microbiology, molecular biology, and biodefense. He also serves as chair- man of Technology Research, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of IITRI. Dr. McCormick is the IITRI professor of biology at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in physiology and toxicology. He joined the IITRI staff in 1979 and the IIT faculty in 1982. Dr. McCormick received his A.B. degree from Middlebury College (Middlebury, VT) with a joint major in chemistry and biology. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental medicine/biology from New York University (New York, NY). He is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. Dr. McCormick’s primary research activi- ties are in the areas of carcinogenesis and cancer prevention, preclinical and environmental toxicology, and the biological effects of magnetic fields. He has published more than 225 research papers, abstracts, and reviews in these areas. He currently serves as principal investigator on four multi- year research programs supported by the National Cancer Institute, and is principal investigator on the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Toxicology Program project entitled “Studies to Evalu- ate the Toxic and Carcinogenic Potential of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Radiation.” Dr. McCormick serves on the editorial boards of three scientific journals (Toxicology, Nutrition and Cancer, and The International Journal of Cancer Prevention) and regularly reviews manuscripts submitted for publication in Cancer Research; Clinical Cancer Research; Carcinogenesis; Molecular Cancer Therapeutics; Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention; Radiation Research; and Bioelectromagnetics; among other journals. He has served on several dozen grant and contract review com- mittees for the National Cancer Institute and other funding agencies. Dr. McCormick is a member of the American Association for Cancer Re- search, the Society of Toxicology, and the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Bernard Veyret, Ph.D., belongs to the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) as “Directeur de Recherche” (senior scientist) at the “Laboratoire de l’Intégration du Matériau au Sytème,” within the College of Chemistry and Physics at the University of Bordeaux 1, France. Trained

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 APPENDIX B as an engineer in physics and chemistry at the Industrial Physics and Chem- istry Higher Educational Institution (ESPCI) in Paris, he joined the CNRS in 1979 and did research on the physical chemistry of the troposphere. Since 1984, Dr. Veyret has turned towards the new field of research on biologi- cal effects of electromagnetic fields (bioelectromagnetics). He is now head of the Bioelectromagnetics Laboratory of the école Pratique des Hautes études. His research team in Bordeaux is composed of about 15 scientists, biologists, and physicists. He was one of the founders of the European Bioelectromagnetics Association (EBEA) in 1989. He belongs to the main commission of ICNIRP and is a member of the International Committee of the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). Dr. Veyret has authored more than 75 papers in peer-reviewed journals and co-authored several na- tional and international expert-group reports on EMF and health. He was the chairman of the French expert group on “Extremely Low Frequency Fields and Health” and is a consultant for the French Agency for Envi- ronmental and Occupational Health Safety (AFSSET) on the same topic. He is currently a consultant with the World Health Organization (WHO), developing a Web-based EMF course for young scientists working in bio- electromagnetics, and has served as the chairman of the RF research recom- mendation committee of WHO. He was the coordinator of the European program Perform-B and was an external reviewer for the RAMP 2001 and TeraHertz-Bridge European programs. Dr. Veyret was awarded the 2007 Medal of the French International Union of Radio Science. Dr. Veyret is a member of the scientific council (consulting board) of Bouygues Telecom, which is one of the three French mobile phone providers. His laboratory has contracts with Alcatel and some of the mobile telephone providers to write scientific reports and conduct research.