Appendix G
Committee Biographies

Barbara J. McNeil, M.D., Ph.D., Chair, is the Ridley Watts Professor and founding Head of the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. She is also a professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. McNeil’s research activities focus on several areas related to quality of care and technology assessment. For several years she coordinated large-scale studies comparing the value of alternative imaging modalities for several cancers. Her most recent projects involve comparing the quality of care for veterans with cancer to the quality of care provided to Medicare beneficiaries seen in private settings. She is currently working with the national Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association to evaluate the effectiveness of various interventions that its plans have undertaken to increase quality and decrease cost. Dr. McNeil received an A.B. from Emmanuel College, an M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. McNeil is also a member of the Blue Cross Technology Evaluation Commission; the Medicare Evidence Development Coverage Advisory Committee, of which she is chair; and the Council for Performance Measurement for the Joint Commission. Previously, Dr. McNeil served as a member of the Prospective Payment Assessment Commission and the Publications Committee of the New England Journal of Medicine.


Harold C. Sox, M.D., M.A.C.P., Vice Chair, editor of the Annals of Internal Medicine, received an undergraduate degree from Stanford University in 1961 and a medical degree from Harvard Medical School in 1966. After



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Appendix G Committee Biographies Barbara J. McNeil, M.D., Ph.D., Chair, is the Ridley Watts Professor and founding Head of the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medi- cal School. She is also a professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. McNeil’s research activities focus on several areas related to quality of care and technology assessment. For several years she coordinated large-scale studies comparing the value of alternative imaging modalities for several cancers. Her most recent proj- ects involve comparing the quality of care for veterans with cancer to the quality of care provided to Medicare beneficiaries seen in private settings. She is currently working with the national Blue Cross and Blue Shield As- sociation to evaluate the effectiveness of various interventions that its plans have undertaken to increase quality and decrease cost. Dr. McNeil received an A.B. from Emmanuel College, an M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. McNeil is also a member of the Blue Cross Technology Evaluation Commission; the Medicare Evidence Development Coverage Advisory Committee, of which she is chair; and the Council for Performance Measurement for the Joint Commission. Previously, Dr. McNeil served as a member of the Prospective Payment Assessment Commission and the Publications Committee of the New England Journal of Medicine. Harold C. Sox, M.D., M.A.C.P., Vice Chair, editor of the Annals of Internal Medicine, received an undergraduate degree from Stanford University in 1961 and a medical degree from Harvard Medical School in 1966. After 7

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 KNOWING WHAT WORKS IN HEALTH CARE serving as a medical intern and resident at Massachusetts General Hospi- tal, he spent two years doing research at the National Institutes of Health and three years at Dartmouth Medical School where he began his studies of medical decision making. Dr. Sox then spent 15 years at the Stanford University School of Medicine as chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine and as a director of ambulatory care at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center. In 1988, he returned to Dartmouth Medi- cal School to chair the Department of Medicine as the Joseph M. Huber Professor of Medicine until 2001, when he became editor of the Annals of Internal Medicine. Dr. Sox has served as chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee, the Institute of Medicine Committee to Study HIV Transmission Through Blood Products, and the Institute of Medicine Committee on Health Effects of Exposures in the Persian Gulf War. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. A general internist, Dr. Sox has served as president of the American College of Physicians. Dr. Sox has also served on the editorial boards of several journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Sox was the principal author of Medical Decision Making (1988), the editor of Common Diagnostic Tests (1987), and the editor or author of eight other books. In his research and writing, Dr. Sox has explored issues such as technology assessment, medical decision making, disease prevention and health promotion, cost-effectiveness analysis, physicians’ and patients’ risk preferences, and medical education. Allen Daniels, LISW, Ed.D., is professor of clinical psychiatry in the De- partment of Psychiatry at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. He also is the chief executive officer of University Managed Care, which has two operational units: Alliance Behavioral Care, a regional managed behavioral health care organization, and UC HealthPartners, a medical disease management company. All of these organizations are affiliated with the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Daniels is active on a number of boards and professional organizations. In 2002 he chaired the American College of Mental Health Administration’s An- nual Summit on Translating the Institute of Medicine’s report Crossing the Quality Chasm for behavioral health care. He has participated in two Institute of Medicine committees, the committee on Crossing the Quality Chasm: Priority Areas for Health Care Improvement and the Committee on Crossing the Quality Chasm: Adaptation to Mental Health and Addic- tive Disorders. Dr. Daniels has published extensively in the areas of man- aged care and group practice operations, quality improvement and clinical outcomes, and academic health care. He has lectured and consulted both nationally and internationally on these subjects. He is a graduate of the

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9 APPENDIX G University of Chicago School of Social Services Administration and the University of Cincinnati. Kay Dickersin, M.A., Ph.D., is a professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and currently serves as the director of the Center for Clinical Trials and the director of the United States Cochrane Center (USCC), 1 of 12 regional centers in the interna- tional Cochrane Collaboration. The Collaboration aims to help people make well-informed decisions about health by preparing, maintaining, and promoting the accessibility of systematic reviews of available evidence on the benefits and risks of health care. From 1994 to 2005, the USCC coordinated development of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, which includes nearly 500,000 controlled trials, most of them pub- lished. Dr. Dickersin is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies and she has been a member of numerous IOM and Na- tional Research Council committees, including the Committee on Research in Education (2002-2004), the Committee on Reimbursement of Routine Patient Care Costs for Medicare Patients Enrolled in Clinical Trials (1998- 1999), the Committee on Defense Women’s Health Research (1996-1997), the Forum on Drug Development (1993-1995), and others. Dr. Dickersin received a B.A. and an M.A. in zoology from the University of California at Berkeley and a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in 1989. Robert S. Galvin, M.D., is the director of Global Health Care for General Electric (GE). He is in charge of the design and performance of GE’s health programs, totaling over $3 billion annually, and oversees the 1 million patient encounters that take place in GE’s 220 medical clinics in more than 20 countries. Drawing on his clinical expertise and training in Six Sigma, Dr. Galvin has been an advocate and leader in extending the benefits of this methodology to health care. Dr. Galvin has focused on issues of market-based health policy and financing, with a special interest in quality improvement, payment reform, and the assessment of medical innovations. He is a past member of the Strategic Framework Board of the National Quality Forum. He is currently on the board of the National Committee for Quality Assurance and is a member of the Task Force on the Future of Military Health Care. He is a cofounder of the Leapfrog Group and is the founder of Bridges to Excellence, one of the first pay-for-performance initiatives. Dr. Galvin is widely published on issues affecting the purchaser side of health care, and is professor adjunct of medicine at Yale University, where he directs the seminar series on the private sector for the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars fellowship. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians.

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0 KNOWING WHAT WORKS IN HEALTH CARE Dana P. Goldman, Ph.D., holds the RAND Chair in Health Economics and is director of the Peter Bing Center for Health Economics. He also is an adjunct professor of radiology and health services at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Dr. Goldman’s research combines ap- plied economics with health care delivery; and he has been published in the top medical, economic, statistics, and health policy journals. He is on the editorial boards of several research journals, including Health Affairs. The sponsors of his research include the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute on Aging, the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Depart- ment of Labor, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the National Science Foundation, and the California HealthCare Foundation. Dr. Goldman is a past recipient of the Alice S. Hersh New Investigator Award, which recognizes the contri- bution of young scholars to the field of health services research. He also received the National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation award for excellence in health policy. Dr. Goldman is a research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research and Director of the UCLA/RAND Postdoctoral Health Services Research Train- ing Program. He received a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University and a B.A. summa cum laude in economics from Cornell University. Richard A. Justman, M.D., is national medical director of UnitedHealth- care, a national health service delivery company. He works in the Clinical Advancement division. Dr. Justman is accountable for medical technology assessment, clinical support of pharmacy programs, and clinical support of benefit administration. He has been with UnitedHealthcare since 1993. Dr. Justman received a B.A. from Cornell University and an M.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He is board certified in pediatrics and received postgraduate training at The University of Chicago Hospitals and Clinics and the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dr. Justman practiced pediatrics in Minneapolis, Minnesota, for 15 years before joining UnitedHealthcare. Arthur A. Levin, M.P.H., is director of the Center for Medical Consumers, a New York City-based nonprofit organization committed to informed consumer and patient health care decision making, patient safety, evidence- based, high-quality medicine, and health care system transparency. Mr. Levin was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Qual- ity of Health Care that published the reports To Err Is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm. He also served on the Institute of Medicine committee that evaluated the federal quality effort in its report Leadership by Example. Mr. Levin serves as a consultant consumer expert on risk management for select Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Drug Advisory Committee

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 APPENDIX G meetings and for four years served as the consumer representative on the FDA’s Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee. Mr. Levin is a member of the Committee on Performance Measures of the National Committee for Quality Assurance and the National Quality Forum Consen- sus Standards Approval Committee. Mr. Levin has also served on numerous New York State Department of Health committees and work groups, most recently one that authored successful legislation to provide oversight of office-based surgery. He earned an M.P.H. from the Columbia University School of Public Health and a B.A. in philosophy from Reed College. Richard E. Marshall, M.D., is the former chief medical officer and a practic- ing pediatrician at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates, a multispecialty medical group of 500 physicians serving 300,000 patients at 16 offices in the Boston, Massachusetts, area. He currently leads the group’s research efforts. Dr. Marshall is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Stanford University. After earning a medical degree from the University of California-San Diego School of Medicine in 1973, he went on to earn an M.S. in nutritional bio- chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Marshall was board certified in pediatrics in 1980. He currently serves on the boards of directors of the following community-based organizations: Fenway Com- munity Health, a community health center and research organization in Boston known for its work on HIV care and prevention, and Massachusetts Health Quality Partners, an organization currently focused on the public release of quality and patient care experience data. He is also a member of the Massachusetts Commission on Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth. Wilhelmine Miller, M.S., Ph.D., is an associate research professor at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, where her research focuses on value-based coverage policy and interven- tions to address social and economic disparities in health. Previously she was a senior program officer at the Institute of Medicine, serving as staff director for the committee that authored Valuing Health for Regulatory Cost-Effectieness Analysis and as co-director of a four-year study on the consequences of uninsurance. Dr. Miller has taught political philosophy, ethics, and public policy in the Departments of Philosophy at Georgetown University and Trinity College, Washington, D.C. She received a doctorate in philosophy from Georgetown in 1997. From 1976 to 1989, Dr. Miller served as a policy analyst and social scientist in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She received an M.S. in health policy and management from Harvard University in 1976.

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 KNOWING WHAT WORKS IN HEALTH CARE Sally C. Morton, Ph.D., joined RTI in 2005 as vice president for statis- tics and epidemiology, and leads a unit of 220 statisticians, epidemiolo- gists, psychometricians, and associated scientists and staff. Previously, Dr. Morton was head of the RAND Corporation Statistics Group from 1995 to 2002 and held the RAND Endowed Chair in Statistics from 2000 to 2005. From 1997 to 2005 she was co-director of the Southern Califor- nia Evidence-based Practice Center funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). At the RAND Corporation, she was also principal investigator of the Medicare Stop Smoking Program, co-principal investigator of the AHRQ Patient Safety Program Evaluation Center, and the data and analysis task leader on the HIV Costs and Services Utilization Study. She held a variety of leadership and statistical roles on numerous other health services projects. Her methodological interests include the use of meta-analysis in evidence-based medicine, the sampling of vulnerable populations, and statistical methods for health services research. Dr. Mor- ton was a member of the faculty of the Pardee RAND Graduate School, taught at the University of California-Los Angeles School of Public Health, and was an adjunct professor at the University of Southern California Mar- shall School of Business. She is an editor of Statistical Science and served as an associate editor for the Journal of the American Statistical Association and the Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics. She serves on the National Institute of Statistical Sciences Executive Committee and is a member of the Educational Testing Service’s Data Advisory Committee for the National Assessment of Educational Progress. She was a member of the National Academy of Sciences panel on small-area estimation of school-age children in poverty. Dr. Morton is president-elect of the American Statistical Association (ASA). She is a fellow of the ASA and of the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science. She received a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. Samuel R. Nussbaum, M.D., is executive vice president and chief medical officer for WellPoint, Inc. He oversees corporate medical policy, clinical pharmacy programs, health improvement and quality resources, programs for clinical excellence, disease and care management, and health informa- tion technology to optimize care for members. His principal responsibilities include serving as the chief spokesperson on medical issues, guiding the corporate vision regarding quality of care and its measurements, leading efforts to assess cost of care performance and developing a strategy to fos- ter further collaboration with physicians and hospitals to strengthen and improve patient care. Dr. Nussbaum also has responsibility for the Health Management Corporation and HealthCore subsidiaries. Dr. Nussbaum has served as president of the Disease Management Association of America, chairman of the National Committee for Quality Health Care, chair of

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 APPENDIX G America’s Health Insurance Plan’s (AHIP’s) Chief Medical Officer Lead- ership Council, and a member of the AHIP board. He received the 2004 Physician Executive Award of Excellence from the American College of Physician’s Executies and Modern Physician magazine. Dr. Nussbaum is a professor of clinical medicine at the Washington University School of Medicine and serves as adjunct professor at the Olin School of Business, Washington University. Dr. Nussbaum served as executive vice president, Medical Affairs and System Integration, of the BJC Health System and is president of its medical group. Dr. Nussbaum earned a medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He trained in internal medicine at Stanford University and the Massachusetts General Hospital and in endo- crinology and metabolism at Harvard University and the Massachusetts General Hospital, where he directed the Endocrine Clinical Group. His clinical and basic research has led to new therapies for the treatment of skeletal disorders and new technologies for the measurement of hormone levels in blood. Diana B. Petitti, M.D., M.P.H., is adjunct professor of the Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. She is also the vice chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Dr. Petitti served on the National Cancer Policy Board (1997- 2003), including as co-chair, the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice (1995-1997), and has co-chaired three Institute of Medicine committees (Committee on New Approaches to Early Detection of Breast Cancer: Accelerating the Flow from Concept to Clinic; Committee on Large-Scale Science and Cancer Research; and the Committee on Cancer Survivorship: Improving Care and Quality of Life After Treatment). Dr. Petitti earned an M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1975. After an internship, she spent two years as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Of- ficer with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She received an M.P.H. from the University of California-Berkeley School of Public Health in 1981 and was board certified in preventive medicine in that year. Dr. Petitti was a member of the Technology Assessment study section of the National Center for Health Services Research from 1983 through 1987. She has authored more than 200 scientific publications. Her book, Meta- analysis, Decision Analysis, and Cost-effectieness Analysis: Methods for Quantitatie Synthesis in Medicine is widely used to teach the methods for evidence synthesis in schools of medicine and public health. From 1993 to 2006, while at Kaiser Permanente Southern California, she participated in this organization’s activities in technology assessment, performance mea- surement and quality assessment and improvement while simultaneously holding positions as the director of research and evaluation (1993-2003) and senior advisor on health policy and medicine (2004-2006).

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 KNOWING WHAT WORKS IN HEALTH CARE Steven Shak, M.D., is chief medical officer of Genomic Health, Inc., which focuses on improving the quality of treatment decisions for cancer patients. He and his colleagues have worked together with leading oncology clini- cal research groups in the United States to use new molecular diagnostic methods and rigorous clinical studies to develop the Oncotype DXTM breast cancer assay. Dr. Shak has previously served as senior director and staff clinical scientist at Genentech, Inc. where he led the clinical team that gained approval for trastuzumab (Herceptin®), a targeted biological treat- ment for metastatic breast cancer. He also initiated the cancer clinical trials of the anti-angiogenesis agent bevacizumab (Avastin®). In addition, Dr. Shak discovered dornase alfa (Pulmozyme®), a mucus-dissolving enzyme that is approved worldwide for the treatment of the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Dr. Shak also held faculty positions at the New York University School of Medicine and Bellevue Hospital from 1978 to 1986. Throughout his career in academia and industry he has focused not only on the science and medicine of drug, device, and diagnostic development but also on the public health issues of access, cost, and appropriate use of expensive new technologies. Dr. Shak served on the board of an independent, non- profit endowment dedicated to expanding access to Pulmozyme therapy to qualifying uninsured and underinsured cystic fibrosis patients. He also par- ticipated in establishing a multicenter epidemiological study of the natural history of cystic fibrosis to describe the practice patterns of cystic fibrosis caregivers and to identify prognostic factors for morbidity and mortality. Dr. Shak has collaborated in drug development with many patient advocacy organizations. He is currently on the board of directors of the Children’s Cause for Cancer Advocacy, a pediatric cancer advocacy organization, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Dr. Shak has received numerous awards and honors for his contributions to medicine and patient care. Dr. Shak has an undergraduate degree from Amherst College, an M.D. from the New York University School of Medicine, and postgraduate training in medicine and research at Bellevue Hospital in New York City and the University of California, San Francisco. Lisa Simpson, M.B., B.Ch., M.P.H., F.A.A.P., is professor and director of the Child Policy Research Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medi- cal Center and the University of Cincinnati Department of Pediatrics. The Center provides evidence-based information to inform policy and program decisions at the local, state, and national levels with an emphasis on strate- gies to improve the quality of health care, the effectiveness of public pro- grams, and child well-being. Dr. Simpson, a board-certified pediatrician, is the national director for Child Health Policy at the National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare Quality, an education and research organiza-

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 APPENDIX G tion dedicated solely to improving the quality of health care provided to children, and serves as an elected member on the board of directors of two national professional associations, AcademyHealth and the Ambulatory Pediatric Association. She was formerly the All Children’s Hospital Guild Endowed Chair in Child Health Policy and professor of pediatrics, nursing, and public health at the University of South Florida, deputy director of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Maternal and Child Health director in Hawaii. Dr. Simpson earned her undergraduate and medical degrees at Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland) and a master of public health at the University of Hawaii. She has received numerous awards in- cluding the Excellence in Public Service Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Senior Executive Service Meritorious Presidential Rank Award, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary’s Distinguished Service Award. Glenn D. Steele, Jr., M.D., Ph.D., became president and chief executive officer of the Geisinger Health System in 2001. In this capacity, he serves as a member of the Geisinger Health System Foundation board of direc- tors, an ex-officio member of all standing committees of the board and chairman of the subsidiary boards. Dr. Steele joined Geisinger from the University of Chicago, where he served as the Richard T. Crane Professor in the Department of Surgery, vice president for medical affairs and dean of the Division of Biological Sciences and the Pritzker School of Medicine. Prior to that he was the William V. McDermott Professor of Surgery at the Harvard University Medical School, chair of the Department of Surgery of New England Deaconess Hospital, and president and chief executive officer of Deaconess Professional Practice Group. Dr. Steele is widely recognized for his investigations into the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer and colorectal cancer surgery. He is a past chair of the American Board of Surgery and serves on the editorial boards of numerous promi- nent medical journals. His laboratory investigations have focused on the cell biology of gastrointestinal cancer and pre-cancer. A prolific writer, he is the author or co-author of more than 450 scientific and professional articles. Dr. Steele is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences and the New England Surgical Society and is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, the American Surgical Association, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Society of Surgical Oncolo- gists, the Commonwealth Fund, Healthcare Executive Network, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Advisory Committee on Rural Health, and the Center of Corporate Innovation. He serves on the American Hospital Association (AHA) Health Care Systems Governing Council and the AHA Strategic Policy Planning and Hospital/Medical Staff

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6 KNOWING WHAT WORKS IN HEALTH CARE Committees. Dr. Steele received a B.A. in history from Harvard College and an M.D. from the New York University School of Medicine. He completed an internship and a residency in surgery at the University of Colorado, where he was also a fellow of the American Cancer Society. He earned a Ph.D. degree in microbiology at Lund University in Sweden.