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Biographical Sketches of Contributors RALPH A. ALEXANDER is a professor of psychology at The University of Akron, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1973. He received his Ph. D. in industrial/ organizational psychology at the University of Rochester. His research interests include applied statistics, cognition, and personnel psychology with a particular emphasis on equal opportunity employment ant! the at- titudes, values, and perceptions of individ- uals in work settings. ROSLYN K. ANSTIE is a research fellow in the Center of Policy Studies at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. She pre- viously worked at the Australian National University, where she undertook research in applied labor economics. She received a B. Ec. from the Australian National Uni- versity. She is the coauthor of several papers on women's pay in Australia and the eco- nomics of immigration and child care. JAMES N. BARON is associate professor of organizational behavior in the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, and has a courtesy appointment in the De- partment of Sociology. During 1988-1989, 247 he is a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He holds a Ph. D. in sociology from the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research fo- cuses on the organization of work, the causes and consequences of inequality in organi- zations (particularly by sex), and changes in employment relations anal personnel poli- c~es. GERALD V. BARRETT has been professor and hea(l of the Department of Psychology at The University of Akron since 1973. He received his Ph. D. in industrial psychology from Case Western Reserve University and his I.D. from The University of Akron, School of Law. He was director of the Human Factors Laboratory for Goodyear Aerospace Corporation for five years and then became professor of psychology and management at the University of Rochester. His recent research is concerned with the interface between personnel psychology anal employment law. He is both a licensecl psychologist and an attorney in the state of Ohio. ANNE DALY is a Ph. D. candidate in eco-

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248 nomics at the Australian National Univer- sity. She received her M.A. in economics from Melbourne University. Her research focuses on the male-female wage differential and on labor procluctivity, particularly on cross-country comparisons and the effect of education. DENNIS DOVERSPIKE is an assistant pro- fessor of psychology at The University of Akron. He received his Ph. D. in industrial/ organizational psychology in 1983 from The University of Akron. His research interests include personnel psychology, job evalua- tion and comparable worth, and employ- ment problems of minority groups. RONALD G. EHRENBERG is Irving M. Ives Professor of Industrial and Labor Re- lations and Economics at Cornell University and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He holds a Ph.D. from Northwestern University. His research focuses on public sector labor mar- kets, wage determination in regulated in- dustries, the evaluation of labor market pro- grams and legislation, resource allocation issues in education, and analyses of com- pensation policies. He is the author of three studies on comparable worth. SARA M. EVANS is professor of history at the University of Minnesota and director of the Center for Advanced Feminist Studies. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the coauthor (with Barbara Nelson) of Wage Justice: Comparable Worth and the Paradox of Technocratic Reform. RANDALL K. FILER is an associate pro- fessor of economics at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He previously taught for eight years at Brandeis University. He received his Ph. D. in economics from Princeton Uni- versity. His research focuses on wages, em- BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS ployment, discrimination, and financial markets. BARRY A. GERHART is an assistant pro- fessor of inclustrial and labor relations at the Center for Advanced Human Resource Studies, New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, at Cornell University. He receiver] his Ph. D. in industrial relations (personnel and organizational behavior) from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research focuses on firms' compensation practices, job' design, and the application of computer technology to decision making. ROBERT G. GREGORY is professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Policy Research at the Research School of Social Sciences of the Australian National University. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the London School of Economics. He has written extensively on labor market issues, including comparable worth. HEIDI I. HARTMANN is director of the Washington-basecT Institute for Women's Policy Research. During 198~1987 she heal an American Statistical Association fellow- ship at the Census Bureau, and for eight years prior to that she was a staff member of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences, where she contrib- uted to many reports on women's employ- ment issues, inclu(ling the 1981 report on pay equity, Women, Work, and Wages: Equal Pay for~obs of Equal Value. She has a Ph. D. in economics from Yale University. VIVIAN HO is a Ph.D. candidate in eco- nomics at Stanford University. She received her B.A. in economics from Harvard Uni- versity, where she wrote her senior honors thesis on equal pay and comparable worth for women in the United States and Aus- tralia. She also holds a Graduate Diploma in economics from the Australian National

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS University, where she did research on labor issues. I. PETER MATTILA is professor of eco- nomics and acting director of the Industrial Relations Center at Iowa State University. He was previously a faculty member at The Ohio State University. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wis- consin, Madison. His research interests have includes] race and sex pay differentials, oc- cupational choice, school enrollment, min- imum wages, the GI bill, and labor market patterns of youths and low-wage workers. He is currently involved in research (with Peter Orazem) on measurement error in comparable worth and the impact of com- parable worth on employment and earnings. ROBERT T. MICHAEL is director of the National Opinion Research Center (NORC), a social science research center affiliated with the University of Chicago, and Eliakim Hastings Moore Distinguished Service Pro- fessor of Education, the College, and the Graduate School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago. An economist, his research interests are in the area of the family, demography, and the economics of consumption and labor. He has held faculty positions at UCLA and Stanford, and was the director of the Palo Alto Office of the National Bureau of Economic Research from 1978 to 1980. He holds a B.A. degree from Ohio Wesleyan and a Ph.D. degree from Columbia University. GEORGE T. MILKOVICH is professor of human resources at the Center for Acivance(1 Human Resource Studies, New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, at Cornell University. He holds a Ph. D. in industrial relations from the University of Minnesota. He has published extensively in the areas of compensation, pay discrim- ination, and other human resource policies and issues; he has also advised numerous corporations, government agencies, and consulting firms on matters related to com- 249 pensation and human resource manage- ment. BRIGID O'FARRELL is study director of the Committee on Women's Employment and Related Social Issues, the Pane] on Employer Policies and Working Families, and the Pane} on Pay Equity Research at the National Research Council. She holds an Ed. M. in social policy from Harvard University. Her research has focused on the implementation of child care, eclucational equity, an(l equal employment opportunity policy, particularly for women in blue-collar and clerical occupations. ALICE NAKAMURA is a professor of busi- ness at the University of Alberta. She re- ceived her Ph.D. in economics from The [ohns Hopkins University. Her research focuses on the work behavior of women. She is the coauthor (with Masao Nakamura) of The Second Paycheck, an econometric analysis of employment, hours of work, and wage experience of women. MASAO NAKAMURA is a professor of busi- ness at the University of Alberta. He hoIcis a Ph.D. in operations research from The Johns Hopkins University. His research fo- cuses on the work behavior of women. He is the coauthor (with Alice Nakamura) of The Second Paycheck, an econometric anal- ysis of employment, hours of work, and wage experience of women. BARBARA I. NELSON is a professor of public affairs and planning at the University of Minnesota an(l codirector of the Center on Women and Public Policy. She received her Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. She is the coauthor (with Sara Evans) of Wage Justice: Comparable Worth and the Paradox of Technocratic Reform. ANDREW E. NEWMAN is a Ph.D. can- didate in sociology at Stanford University. Prior to pursuing his graduate (legrees, he

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250 worked in corporate human resources and labor relations management, including af- firmative action and equal employment ad- ministration. His other research interests include the political economy of government bureaucracy and the evolution and insti- tutionalization of state-society relations. PETER F. ORAZEM is an associate pro- fessor of economics at Iowa State University. He hoists a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University. His research interests include work on occupational choice, measurement of wage discrimination, demancl for school- ing, market impacts of measurement error in government forecasts, and various topics in agricultural economics. TOBY L. PARCEL is associate professor of sociology at The Ohio State University. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Washington. Her research fo- cuses on economic segmentation, especially studies of labor market/segment structures and their effects on the economic outcomes of individuals. Her current research is on the effects of technology ant] technological change on work organization and workers' outcomes, and on the effects of maternal working conditions and child-care arrange- ments on child development. JEAN ROSS is assistant director of research for the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), AFL-CIO, where she co- ordinates the union's research and policy efforts in the area of pay equity. She holds a master's in city planning from the Uni- versity of California, Berkeley. Her research concentrates on issues relating to public and service sector employees, including the role of state and local government in the pro- vision of public services, funding for public services, and women's employment issues. As SEIU's representative on the Board of Directors of the National Committee on Pay Equity, she chairs the committee's Research Task Force. BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF CONTRIBUTORS JAMES P. SMITH is an economist, holds the Rand Corporation Chair in Labor Mar- kets and Demographic Studies, and is di- rector of Rand's Labor and Population Stud- ies Program. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He has published extensively on a range of topics, including the determinants of women's wages and their labor supply. He has recently com- pleted a major project that investigate(1 the determinants of the growth in the female work force and the apparent stability in women s wages. ELAINE SORENSEN is an assistant pro- fessor of economics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a research as- sociate at The Urban Institute. She received her Ph. D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. She has consi(ler- able expertise in the fields of women in the labor force, wage determination, cliscrimi- nation theory, and occupational segregation. LINDA MEZYDLO SUBICH is an associate professor of psychology at The University of Akron. She receive(1 her Ph.D. in coun- seling psychology from The Ohio State Uni- versity. Her research and teaching interests have centered on occupational behavior, especially women's occupational behavior. CHRISTOPHER WINSHIP is chair of the Department of Sociology at Northwestern University, where he is also a professor in the (lepartments of Statistics and Econom- ics. He is a research associate at the Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research at Northwestern University and at the Eco- nomics Research Center-National Opinion Research Center (NORC), University of Chicago. He hoIcls a Ph. D. in sociology from Harvard University. His current re- search is on the effects of black male and female employment on black marriage rates an(1 the effect of black female employment on out-of-wecllock fertility.