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COMMITTEE AND STAFF BIOGRAPHIES

COMMITTEE

Mary (Missy) H. Feeley (Cochair) is chief geoscientist in the Technical Department with the ExxonMobil Exploration Company. She earned a PhD in oceanography from Texas A&M University in 1984. At ExxonMobil, she has been involved in many capacity-building activities in Africa, Asia, and Europe. Her responsibilities include advising senior ExxonMobil Upstream management on strategic geoscience matters and identifying global geoscience opportunities for ExxonMobil. She is also responsible for linking business-unit needs to the geophysical research program in ExxonMobil’s Upstream Research Company. Dr. Feeley is a member of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, the Society of Exploration Geophysicists, and the American Geophysical Union. She is also a member of the Ocean Studies Board.


Silvio Pantoja (Cochair) is a professor of oceanography at the University of Concepción in Chile, where he is responsible for a funded university program that aims to build capacity in the ocean sciences. He earned a PhD in oceanography from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He was a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and a Fulbright Visiting Scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research interests include biogeochemical cycling of organic matter in the marine environment, pathways of degradation and preservation of organic matter, organic biomarkers and stable isotopes as tracers of past and present oceanographic processes, and use of stable isotopes as tracers of sources and diagenetic alteration of organic molecules. He is the chair in oceanography



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a commIttee and staff BIograPhIes COMMITTEE Mary (Missy) H. Feeley (Cochair) is chief geoscientist in the Technical Department with the ExxonMobil Exploration Company. She earned a PhD in oceanography from Texas A&M University in 1984. At ExxonMobil, she has been involved in many capacity-build- ing activities in Africa, Asia, and Europe. Her responsibilities include advising senior ExxonMobil Upstream management on strategic geoscience matters and identifying global geoscience opportunities for ExxonMobil. She is also responsible for linking busi- ness-unit needs to the geophysical research program in ExxonMobil’s Upstream Research Company. Dr. Feeley is a member of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, the Society of Exploration Geophysicists, and the American Geophysical Union. She is also a member of the Ocean Studies Board. Silvio Pantoja (Cochair) is a professor of oceanography at the University of Concepción in Chile, where he is responsible for a funded university program that aims to build capac- ity in the ocean sciences. He earned a PhD in oceanography from the State University . of New York at Stony Brook. He was a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and a Fulbright Visiting Scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His research interests include biogeochemical cycling of organic matter in the marine environment, pathways of deg- radation and preservation of organic matter, organic biomarkers and stable isotopes as tracers of past and present oceanographic processes, and use of stable isotopes as tracers of sources and diagenetic alteration of organic molecules. He is the chair in oceanography 123

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124 APPENDIX A at the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization. Tundi Agardy is the founder and executive director of Sound Seas, which works to pro- mote effective marine conservation by using both science and sociology and works as the interface between public policy and community-based conservation. She earned a PhD in biological sciences from the University of Rhode Island in 1987. She has worked glob- ally, specializing in marine protected areas and coastal management, and was formerly employed as a senior scientist at the World Wildlife Fund and senior director of the Global Marine Program for Conservation International. Juan Carlos Castilla is a professor at the Center for Advanced Studies in Ecology and Biodiversity at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. He earned a PhD in marine biology from the University College of North Wales in 1970. His research interests include rocky intertidal community structure and dynamics, the ecological role of keystone spe- cies, coastal conservation, and comanagement of small-scale benthic resources in Chile and Latin America. He contributed to the establishment and development of the Marine Coastal Station in Las Cruces, Chile, and of marine protected areas along the coast of Chile. Dr. Castilla is a member of the Third World Academy of Sciences, the Chilean Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Stephen Farber is a professor of economics in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh and director of the Environmental Decision Support Program and the Public and Urban Affairs Program. Dr. Farber earned a PhD in economics from Vanderbilt University in 1973. His research focuses on the economics of ecosystems, particularly the economic valuation of ecosystems and their services. He has served as a consultant and advisory board member for coastal manage- ment, watershed management, regional sewer and waste treatment, and urban sustain- ability programs. Indumathie Hewawasam is a senior environmental specialist at the World Bank. She earned a law degree in Sri Lanka and practiced as an attorney at the official bar in Sri Lanka in the late 1970s and early 1980s. She earned an MA in international development and environmental management from American University, Washington, DC, and a PhD in marine policy from the University of Delaware. Her expertise is in coastal and marine resource management, community-based natural resources management, and poverty and sustainable development in Africa. Among her contributions to marine policy at the World

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125 APPENDIX A Bank are the publications Managing the Marine and Coastal Environment of Sub-Saharan Africa: Strategic Directions and Blueprint 2050: Sustaining the Marine Environment in Mainland Tanzania and Zanzibar. The last decade of her work at the World Bank has focused on assisting developing nations with policy and institutional development toward sound management of their exclusive economic zones, territorial waters, coastal zones, sustainable livelihoods, and poverty reduction through sound natural resources manage- ment. She also advises on the World Bank’s Tsunami Rehabilitation Program in South India. Outside the World Bank, Dr. Hewawasam serves on the Steering Committee of the Global Forum on Oceans, Coasts, and Islands and on the Advisory Committee of the Pew Fellows in Marine Conservation. Joanna Ibrahim is a lecturer in coastal engineering and coastal zone management at the University of the West Indies, where she is establishing an active coastal research unit in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department. She earned a PhD from the University of Plymouth (UK) in 1998. Her research interests include coastal zone manage- ment and process issues, such as sediment transport, beach morphodynamics, and natural hazards vulnerability. Jane Lubchenco is a Distinguished Professor of Zoology and Wayne and Gladys Valley Professor of Marine Biology at Oregon State University. She earned a PhD in ecology from Harvard University in 1975. Her research interests include public understanding of science, marine conservation, ecosystem services, ecological consequences of global change, biodiversity, and sustainable ecological systems. Dr. Lubchenco is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Bonnie McCay is a Board of Governors Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Human Ecology at Cook College of Rutgers University. She earned a PhD in anthropol- ogy from Columbia University in 1976. Her research interests include the socioeconomic, cultural, and political dimensions of marine fisheries and fisheries management and com- munity responses to industrialization related to offshore wind energy. She is vice chair of the Federal Advisory Committee on Marine Protected Areas. Nyawira Muthiga is a conservation scientist at the Wildlife Conservation Society and coordinates its marine programs in the Western Indian Ocean, including projects in Kenya, Tanzania, Mauritius, the Seychelles, and Madagascar. She earned a PhD in zool- ogy from the University of Nairobi in 1996. Dr. Muthiga’s research focuses on monitoring coral reefs in protected and unprotected areas along the Kenyan coast, socioeconomic

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126 APPENDIX A perspectives of coastal resource use, and the process of integrated coastal management. Her work involves direction of management planning, research and monitoring, and train- ing programs in the management and use of coastal and marine wetlands, awareness of the value of wetlands, and conservation geared to the sustainable management of these ecosystems. She received the National Geographic/Buffett Award for achievements in con- servation and the Kenyan resident’s award, the Order of the Grand Warrior. Dr. Muthiga is also president of the Western Indian Ocean Marine Science Association. Stephen Olsen is director of the Coastal Resources Center at the University of Rhode Island. He earned an MS in biological oceanography from the University of Rhode Island in 1970. His research focuses on capacity-building to address anthropogenic changes in coastal ecosystems, governance of coastal ecosystems, and formulation, application, and refinement of coastal management initiatives in developed and developing nations. He has worked on developing a learning-based, issue-driven approach to the manage- ment of coastal ecosystems through long-term programs in Latin America, East Africa, and Southeast Asia. Mr. Olsen has worked with the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, the United Nations Development Programme, and the U.S. Agency for International Development on their coastal management initiatives in a growing num- ber of countries. He has also been working to formulate a common method for learning from coastal management experience. Shubha Sathyendranath is the executive director of the Partnership for Observation of the Global Oceans (POGO) at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada. Her work at POGO focuses on implementation issues, such as technical compatibility among observing networks, shared use of infrastructure, and public out- reach and capacity-building; and she has been a participant in international forums on capacity-building. She earned a PhD in optical oceanography from the Université Pierre & Marie Curie in Paris, France, in 1981. Her research interests include marine optics, remote sensing, and international coordination, cooperation, and research. Michael Sissenwine is an independent marine-science consultant and Visiting Scholar of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He served as director of scientific programs and chief science adviser for the National Marine Fisheries Service for three years, until June 2005, and previously as director of the Northeast Fisheries Science Center for six years. Dr. Sissenwine has been active in capacity-building projects on several continents; his research interests include ecosystem dynamics, fisheries oceanography, resource assessments, and fishery management theory and case studies. He has served as president

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127 APPENDIX A of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, as U.S. delegate to the Pacific Science Association, as a member of the Commission on Fisheries Resources of the World Humanity Action Trust in the UK, as chair of the Advisory Committee on Fishery Research for the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, and as a member of the Ocean Studies Board of the National Research Council. Daniel Suman is a professor in the Division of Marine Affairs and Policy in the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami and is an adjunct professor in the School of Law. He earned a PhD in chemical oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and an MEd in international education, an MA in comparative education, and a certificate in Latin American studies from Columbia University. In addition, Dr. Suman has a JD and a certificate in environmental law from the University of California, Berkeley. His main research interests are the adaptability of the fishing sectors in Chile, Perú, and Ecuador to El Niño-Southern Oscillation climate vari- ability, including the response of industrial fishing companies and labor unions, artisanal fishing unions, and government regulators to environmental uncertainty; mangrove man- agement in Latin American and Caribbean countries; coastal area management and plan- ning; and conflict resolution in marine protected areas. Much of his research focuses on Central and South America, particularly Panamá. He was a member of the Ocean Studies Board and is a member of the World Conservation Union’s Commission on Environmental Law, and the Federal Advisory Committee on Marine Protected Areas. Giselle Tamayo is a professor of natural products and organic synthesis at the University of Costa Rica. She earned a PhD from the Technical University of Berlin in 1989. She also leads a group in genetic and genomic research and is involved in international efforts to develop appropriate ways for developed and developing countries to work together to sample and study genetic resources. She is a scientific adviser to Costa Rica’s diplomatic teams that develop access and benefit treaties, such as the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. STAFF Susan Roberts became the director of the Ocean Studies Board in April 2004. She received her PhD in marine biology from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Dr. Roberts’s research experience has included fish muscle physiology and biochemistry, marine bacte- rial symbioses, and developmental cell biology. She has directed a number of studies for the Ocean Studies Board, including those which led to the reports A Review of the Ocean

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128 APPENDIX A Research Priorities Plan and Implementation Strategy (2007); Mitigating Shore Erosion Along Sheltered Coasts (2007); Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay (2004); Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters: Untangling Food Webs and Fishing Nets (2003); Effects of Trawling and Dredging on Seafloor Habitat (2002); Marine Protected Areas: Tools for Sustaining Ocean Ecosystems (2001); Under the Weather: Climate, Ecosystems, and Infectious Disease (2001); Bridging Boundaries Through Regional Marine Research (2000); and From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean’s Role in Human Health (1999). Dr. Roberts specializes in the science and management of living marine resources. Frank R. Hall joined the Ocean Studies Board as a program officer in January 2006 and served as the study director for the committee through July 2007. He received his PhD in oceanography from the University of Rhode Island in 1991. His dissertation research involved quaternary paleoceanographic reconstructions of the high-latitude Atlantic and Arctic Oceans. In 1994, he was awarded a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship to study at the Institute for Arctic and Alpine Research. In 1998, Dr. Hall joined the faculty at the University of New Orleans as a geoscience educator, focusing on the preparation of preservice and inservice grades K–12 science teachers. Before joining the Ocean Studies Board, he served as a program officer in the Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education at the National Science Foundation. Jodi Bostrom is a research associate with the Ocean Studies Board. She earned an MS in environmental science from American University in 2006 and a BS in zoology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1998. Since starting with the board in May 1999, Ms. Bostrom has worked on several studies pertaining to coastal restoration, fisheries, marine mammals, nutrient overenrichment, ocean exploration, and capacity-building.